Welcome to the new version of European Tribune. It's just a new layout, so everything should work as before - please report bugs here.
Display:
A simple test:

People travelling (transporting their bodies) tend to transport their minds and become unaware of their immediate surroundings. That is why it is possible to travel several miles on a motorway with no memory of that part of the journey. A lack of novelty disconnects us. This is the normal humdrum state of many people.

But if you place the word 'Blue' in travelling people's minds, they will see blue everywhere they look. Or red. It will appear as if blue (or red) has some significance.

The world is unsurprisingly full of random coincidences. If you are in humdrum state, you won't be aware of most of them. But if you are, in the zen sense, fully aware, you will notice many of them.

And, if you are 'tuned in', or sensitised, you may impose significance on these random events. But there is no significance, except internally.

There is no statistical evidence that Friday 13th is more dangerous than any other, or that walking under ladders, or seeing black cats have any significance other than heightening sensitivity to other events that occur in association.

My position is that all these are internally significant (ie in the mind), but externally (as a descritpion of reality) insignificant. Such things as the I-Ching or the Tarot are interesting to study for the internal effects.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Tue Oct 17th, 2006 at 05:20:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Nothing wrong with Tarot as a storytelling aid. Instead of calling the reader "diviner" they should be called "storyteller".

Those whom the Gods wish to destroy They first make mad. -- Euripides
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Oct 17th, 2006 at 05:52:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Most of everyday life is taken up with the exchange of parables and metaphors between close people. Even narratives about sport (!) usually contain 'meaning', with the 'meaning' never explained or made overt, but implicit in the narrative.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Tue Oct 17th, 2006 at 06:15:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The world is unsurprisingly full of random coincidences. If you are in humdrum state, you won't be aware of most of them. But if you are, in the zen sense, fully aware, you will notice many of them.

Not quite. If you're truly in the Zen state, more coincidences will happen.

And they will be outrageous coincidences that have no business happening, and simply don't happen at all when you're not in the Zen state.

Selective attention only goes so far as an explanation. (Based on my experience, anyway.)

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue Oct 17th, 2006 at 08:53:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
To be truly in the zen state allows for no coincidences at all! You are in the moment, the moment is eternal. There is no time differentiation for coincidence to happen. There is no meaning in anything because everything is the meaning.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Tue Oct 17th, 2006 at 09:09:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Possibly.

But that doesn't explain the outrageous coincidences.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue Oct 17th, 2006 at 09:13:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
A truly zen argument gentlemen.  Very enjoyable.

Here's a koan for ye.

JOSHU, an old monk, was making a pot of tea in the main hall when he spotted a monk he'd never seen before.  He called the monk over.

"I'm old and forgetful," said Joshu.  "Have I met you before?"

The monk answered, "No sir, you have not."

"Well then, sit down and have a cup of tea with me," said Joshu.

Another monk came up to ask Joshu a question.

"I'm old and forgetful," said Joshu.  "Have I met you before?"

"Yes sir, of course you have," said the second monk.

"Well then, sit down and have a cup of tea with me," said Joshu.

Later, when the others were gone, the managing monk of the monastery came over to Joshu, who was making another pot of tea.

"How is it," said the manager, "that you make the same offer of tea whatever the reply to your
question?"

At this Joshu stood up.

"Manager!" he shouted.  "Are you still here?"

"Of course I am!" the manager answered.

"Well then, sit down and have a cup of tea with me," said Joshu.

(Stolen and modified from here.)



Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.

by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Tue Oct 17th, 2006 at 10:41:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Mu.

(Or as we call it in the UK - Mornington Crescent.)

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue Oct 17th, 2006 at 11:25:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Funny coincidence: I was just about to not say that ;-)

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Tue Oct 17th, 2006 at 11:12:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]

Display:

Top Diaries

Occasional Series