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Yes of course you are correct. But for a number of reasons the competitivness of Swedish process industry must not decrease. It's just a big no-no.

Anyway, using wood fuel is not an option. It is already used for heating all our cities in combined heat and power plants, and in the very important paper industry, not to mention the big plans for cellulosic ethanol or black liquor for DME.

There is just not enough wood.

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.

by Starvid on Thu Apr 20th, 2006 at 09:59:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
CIA World Fact Book:
Timber, hydropower, and iron ore constitute the resource base of an economy heavily oriented toward foreign trade. Privately owned firms account for about 90% of industrial output, of which the engineering sector accounts for 50% of output and exports.

GDP - composition by sector:

  • agriculture: 1.8%
  • industry: 28.6%
  • services: 69.7% (2005 est.)

Industries:
iron and steel, precision equipment (bearings, radio and telephone parts, armaments), wood pulp and paper products, processed foods, motor vehicles
It does seem you may have hit "the limits of growth" unless you use nuclear power (even at an increasing rate). Not good.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Apr 20th, 2006 at 10:11:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Not really. The amount of hydro and timber resources have been finite (albeit renewable) and exploited almost to max for several decades, and during the latest 30 years our energy consumption has remained constant. The only change has been a switch from oil to biofuels and nuclear power.

As a matter of fact, biofuels is larger than nuclear energy in Sweden. The energy balance is something like:

  • Nuclear 13 %

  • Hydro 13 %

  • Biofuels 17 %

  • Oil 40 %

  • Other and calculation error 17 %

By the way, I have been looking more closely at Swedish uranium reserves. They fall mainly into two kinds. Some newly discovered pretty small high grade reserves and the awesome giant very low grade reserves.

The world's total conventional (ie very low grade excluded) uranium reserves are 2 million metric tonnes. The unconventional reserves at Mount Billingen alone are 300.000 to 1 million tonnes. Total Swedish reserves are 4-32 million metric tonnes.

The big spread is due to no one looking for uranium since 1980 when we had our negative nuclear referendum. All funds for uranium prospecting were cut.

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.

by Starvid on Fri Apr 21st, 2006 at 03:04:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]

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