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The present alarm on climate change is an instrument of social control, a pretext for major businesses and political rattle.

First of all, I think there's a typo in the last word, which should be "battle" (or "combat", combate politico).

Then I don't get what he's saying. Social control? How?  What freedom is he suggesting is being infringed? By or on behalf of whom?

Major businesses? What's their interest? If this notion is true, why is the country that has the biggest businesses and in which big business has perhaps the longest arm, fighting against the alarm on climate change?

Political combat? Does he mean one side of the political spectrum is using climate change fear against the other? That would be the left against the right? Or, or...?

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Jan 24th, 2008 at 08:58:55 AM EST
Hi afew, combate evolved from the latin combatuere as did tits english conterpart combat. The literal translation would have been political combat which has a slightly different semantics than the original meaning. I chose rattle which might hoave not been a fortunate choice, political fight might be more correct.

I can't answer for the social control, I also don't know exactly what it meant. Maybe social conditioning could have been a more fortunate choice of words - there are some veins of thought that behind the climate change issue is a global governance project. I doubt prof. Delgado Domingos was referencing that.

As for your last two questions, Anthropogenic Global Warming became a political issue when the then Senator Al Gore tried to descredit Richard Lindzen at Congress. From then on it became a political option between Conservatism and Liberalism. As in Europe about 80% of the voters support Liberal politics this division was never apparent, but it is quite so in the US.

As for business, Al Gore spoke at Lisbon last year, charging more than a monthly minimum wage to every attendee. Check how his fortune has been growing since he left office and follow from there.

You might find me At The Edge Of Time.

by Luis de Sousa (luis[dot]a[dot]de[dot]sousa[at]gmail[dot]com) on Mon Jan 28th, 2008 at 09:46:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Luis de Sousa:
As for your last two questions, Anthropogenic Global Warming became a political issue when the then Senator Al Gore tried to descredit Richard Lindzen at Congress. From then on it became a political option between Conservatism and Liberalism. As in Europe about 80% of the voters support Liberal politics this division was never apparent, but it is quite so in the US.
Oh, it is apparent. The European People's Party is increasingly adopting a sceptic position. The foremost example of this is Vaclav Klaus, but in Spain the PP has clearly adopted denialist messages.

We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Jan 28th, 2008 at 09:51:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
denialist

I love that word.

I didn't know that about the PP. The issue is that the People's party is undermined by Liberals. Take for instance the case of Barroso, when he joined the portuguese liberal party (PSD) it belong to the European Liberal group; somewhere during the turning of the century they simply left and joined the conservatives, in so doing gaining practical grip on the Parliament.

And before you know it, a man that started his carer in the Communist Workers party is head of the Commission backed by Conservative Europe :-)

The debate on Anthropogenic Global Warming shouldn't be a plitical option, like every scientific issue.

You might find me At The Edge Of Time.

by Luis de Sousa (luis[dot]a[dot]de[dot]sousa[at]gmail[dot]com) on Mon Jan 28th, 2008 at 10:09:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It shouldn't, but it is.

We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Jan 28th, 2008 at 10:17:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]

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