Welcome to the new version of European Tribune. It's just a new layout, so everything should work as before - please report bugs here.
Display:
In the 1950's. Really, right after the war.

It is a dirty secret that we did a bad job integrating those waves. Jerome will deeply disagree with this, I think, but really, the '80's and especially '90's were really pivotal in locking that failed integration in. We had a period of really sustained unemployment for so-called unskilled workers, first from the reaction to socialist reforms in the 1980's (unfortunately the rest of Europe wasn't ready for socialism) and then from Germany's re-unification that we all paid for via a really nasty recession.

We spent more than a generation under full employment. that's a recipe, in my view, for regression, and this is not an exception for France in the 1990's.

Adding to this,as regards what is happening in Ireland, I always thought that Ireland would somehow escape the downside of the inevitable neo-liberal hangover. After all, in Ireland you have perhaps the smartest people in all of Europe, an ability to deal favorably with the Americans, and the English language which accentuates the first two things. On top of this, Ireland chose to excel, in terms of finance, in back office automation instead of the speculative bullshit which is going to kill the uk.

I know the rest of us were supposed to watch the celtic tiger whose "reforms" we the rest of us were supposed to imitate, starting with the corporate tax cuts. But I think they made a mistake on this in Dublin, and more than a few Haugheys could have done with ten-dollar american shirts instead of hundred punt french hand-tailored ones, for which working irish, like working english, pay the price.

at least here there's a (more or less) progressive tax to pay for the corruption...

The Hun is always either at your throat or at your feet. Winston Churchill

by r------ on Tue Jan 20th, 2009 at 05:34:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Others have rated this comment as follows:

melo 4

Display:

Occasional Series