Welcome to the new version of European Tribune. It's just a new layout, so everything should work as before - please report bugs here.
Display:
I have found that this is generally a rule within an organization that has an informal pecking order that contrasts to the formal order: It is always undemocratic and evil for those on the bottom of the pecking order to meet and discuss stuff in advance, while those on the top always does. This goes double if they discuss why the organization is not how it is formally presented.

Nice to see Sarko confirm it in EU.

My interpretation of the attack is that their is a rather strict informal pecking order within the Council with France high up an the Visegrád countries close to the bottom. Sarkozy also feels his position slipping or at least fears it, thus prompting an attack on a weak target to shore up his position. So the Visegrád group is not attacked because it is strong, but because it is weak.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Thu Nov 5th, 2009 at 06:20:22 AM EST
A swedish kind of death:
Sarkozy also feels his position slipping or at least fears it, thus prompting an attack on a weak target to shore up his position. So the Visegrád group is not attacked because it is strong, but because it is weak.
In other words, Sarkozy is acting as a classic playground bully.

Must be his short-man complex.

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 5th, 2009 at 06:25:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The little guy who palls with the big guys and attacks the other little ones to ensure they don't get in with the big guys...

notes from no w here
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Thu Nov 5th, 2009 at 11:17:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Sarkozy's "the mouth is quicker than the brain" has already gotten him in trouble in the first years of his presidency.

On the domestic front, at last, he has now learned his lesson and is controlling the message thanks to:

  • Friendly media owned by BFF like Bouygues, Lagardère or Bolloré...
  • Police officers who are removed from the street to provide "protection" to the numerous presidential outings by filtering all mere mortals who get within half a mile from the prez, letting only UMP card holders (and short-sized factory workers for photo ops - I kid you not). So no more "Casse toi pauvre con" incidents that marred his beginning in office.
  • The disarray in the left wing parties, especially the Socialists, carefully helped with luring some opportunists to power -- effectively neutering them.

However, it doesn't scale so nicely at the EU level, and the king doesn't appear as fully clothed as he'd like himself to be seen.
by Bernard on Fri Nov 27th, 2009 at 08:47:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]

Display:

Occasional Series