Welcome to the new version of European Tribune. It's just a new layout, so everything should work as before - please report bugs here.
Display:
I am increasingly convinced that the low "productivity" (defined as euros of output per euro of wages or hour of work) is the result of chronic underinvestment in physical plant. German wages are higher than peripheral wages, so the high productivity is obtained with an even higher value of output.

The point is that a worker working with their bare hands is going to produce less output than a worker working with proper tools. So underinvestment in physical capital results in low labour productivity.

But all the Serious People think the problem is the workers.

Economics is politics by other means

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed May 18th, 2011 at 10:41:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
This is an important point. I'd rate it equally with the failure to provide educational opportunity and also to provide the motivation for education (which of course is a complex issue).

And tools includes IT.

I note in a recent world survey (citation needed) that 41% of English workers thought their immediate bosses to be totally incompetent. The figure was less in France - maybe 19% as I recall).

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Wed May 18th, 2011 at 11:00:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The "peripherals" are well educated. A whole generation of Greeks has studied abroad and is comfortable with new technologies. The Spanish problem is what to do with a "best-educated generation ever" which appears condemned to a combination of unemployment, menial work and mileurism with the IMF recently warning of the risk of a "lost generation".

No, the problem is the bosses.

Economics is politics by other means

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed May 18th, 2011 at 11:07:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Exactly.

Spain has educated workers. The real problem is that Spanish businesses often seek to compete on low wages instead of good management and investment strategies.

The Basque Country has been a notable, if partial, exception.

There this is more competition based on quality and specialization, with the attendant investment in plant and vocational skills.  The uncoordinated use of universities to provide workers marketable skills ends badly.  Student leave with a general education and little of actual use in getting a job.

And I'll give my consent to any government that does not deny a man a living wage-Billy Bragg

by ManfromMiddletown (manfrommiddletown at lycos dot com) on Wed May 18th, 2011 at 11:16:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Spain has educated workers. The real problem is that Spanish businesses often seek to compete on low wages instead of good management and investment strategies.

That's not the story that the Spanish serious people are telling in serious publications such as this one.

Economics is politics by other means

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed May 18th, 2011 at 11:42:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Might that be because they are neo-liberal pieces of puta mierda?

Seriously. This is around the area of my dissertation.  Spain, varieties of capitalism, etc.

Part of my argument is that at least one part of Spain, e.g. the Basque Country, has been moving closer to the German model, and away from the more liberal UK model. And if you look at the numbers, the Basque country have fared much better in this recession than the rest of Spain.  It's one of, if not the only, part of the industrialized world in which industry as a % of GDP is on the rise.

And I'll give my consent to any government that does not deny a man a living wage-Billy Bragg

by ManfromMiddletown (manfrommiddletown at lycos dot com) on Wed May 18th, 2011 at 12:07:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
When are you next visiting for field work?

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed May 18th, 2011 at 12:15:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't really know if I'm going to be able to do field work.  No money, no time.  The university has decided that they aren't going to honor their agreement to 6 years of funding.  So I have a year, and then I have to find a job. I will have to find work then, but I'm not sure if I will have the dissertation done. I've thought about trying to find work in Spain, but academic pay there is ridiculously low.  As I'm certain you know.  I had a friend offered a full time position in Barcelona for 1500 euro a month. With rents being what they are that's an issue.

And I'll give my consent to any government that does not deny a man a living wage-Billy Bragg
by ManfromMiddletown (manfrommiddletown at lycos dot com) on Wed May 18th, 2011 at 12:29:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Gotta love the apuntes liberales de un chico de derechas blog.

I need a shower.

Economics is politics by other means

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed May 18th, 2011 at 12:16:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I was in no way impugning Spanish education - merely pointing out that in a Just Society various priorities have to be straight.

Education and tools are two priorities. The others are: health and welfare support, low salary differentials, a justice system that treats all equally, regardless of income, and free speech and the right to congregate.

These are the MINIMUM conditions. There's lots more.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Wed May 18th, 2011 at 12:08:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Nah, profits and the real value of net worths need to be protected. That's the only priority at play here.

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed May 18th, 2011 at 12:10:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Migreu:
No, the problem is the bosses.

The problem is also those who select the bosses and the financial and business paradigms under which they labor. The problem is "capital", which is, at its basis, political in nature -- the ability to order and reorder the structure of society in the interests of the ruling elite. Those interests in The WestTM, (the former First World), seem now to be wealth extraction and not wealth creation. And the even larger problem is the evil spell of wealth serving economic theory that has been cast over most of the population of The WestTM so as, as Frank S. noted, to enchant them to become the instruments of their own oppression through the Democratic selection of their leaders.  

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed May 18th, 2011 at 12:14:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It is ironic to note that this ongoing process is strongly supporting the emergence of China as the dominant power in the 21 Century and certainly hastening the relative rise of the BRICs. This is almost entirely because we privilege our elites to put the profit to themselves and their international firms far above the interests of the societies and nations in which they operate.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed May 18th, 2011 at 12:18:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Can we take a moment to remind ourselves that the rise in power of states containing, what, half of humanity is a good thing?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed May 18th, 2011 at 12:22:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's a good thing in that the Chinese seem - so far - to be more pragmatic and less ideological about their economics.

(Ironically.)

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed May 18th, 2011 at 12:29:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]

  And the "so far" is all-important.

"In such an environment it is not surprising that the ills of technology should seem curable only through the application of more technology..." John W Aldridge
by proximity1 on Wed May 18th, 2011 at 02:36:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Coleman, I agree that the rise of ALL of the BRICs is a good thing, the most positive thing to come out of this debacle. But accelerating that process by looting and tanking the economies of the former First World is not a good thing -- especially for the residents of those societies, the vast majority of which did not benefit from the process.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed May 18th, 2011 at 05:25:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
To ask another question - how much productivity is enough?

At what point will the serious people accept that workers in any country are pulling their weight?

It may be true that undercapitalisation leads to poor productivity, but it's also true that as long as workers elsewhere are being "more productive", comparisons can be used as a stick with which to beat those lower down the hierarchy.

I'm beginning to suspect the only way to stop this nonsense isn't direct action or protest - that's not working so well in Greece - but a persistent and lasting mass international blogger campaign of calling the serious people on their bullshit in every single online and offline forum that's available.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed May 18th, 2011 at 11:03:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Bingo!

I am increasingly convinced that the low "productivity" (defined as euros of output per euro of wages or hour of work) is the result of chronic underinvestment in physical plant.

Low wages are an inefficient subsidy to management because they discourage investment needed to make best use of employee's working hours. Think of a fast food restaurant.  If wages are high, things become automated.  For example instead of having a fryer manned by a low wage worker, you have machines that only need to be loaded and unloaded. Same thing with filling drinks. But these things cost money. Labor saving devices only make business sense if their purchase and upkeep costs less than paying someone to do it manually.  

And I'll give my consent to any government that does not deny a man a living wage-Billy Bragg

by ManfromMiddletown (manfrommiddletown at lycos dot com) on Wed May 18th, 2011 at 11:10:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I read the following the other day from a surprising source:

Allianz CEO warns against Greece default - paper

BERLIN, May 23 (Reuters) - The chief executive of Europe's largest insurer, Allianz, warned governments not to push Athens toward insolvency by blocking further aid to Greece.

...'Greece cannot save itself alone through a debt restructuring. The country must not decouple itself from capital markets,' Diekmann said. 'We need an industrialisation plan for Greece, a type of Marshall Plan. European labour and production need to be shifted to the country.'

A translation of the more detailed original, without linking to the Axel Springer source:

Mit einer Umschuldung allein ist Griechenland nicht zu retten. Das Land darf nicht vom Kapitalmarkt abgekoppelt werden, die Wirtschaft muss in der Lage sein zu gesunden und zu wachsen. Mit Geld allein ist das griechische Problem nicht zu lösen. Wir brauchen einen Industrialisierungsplan für Griechenland, eine Art Marshall-Plan. Es müsste Arbeit und Produktion aus ganz Europa in das Land verlagert werden. Was spricht dagegen, Fabriken nach Griechenland statt nach Osteuropa oder Asien auszulagern. Das würde den Griechen enorm helfen, um wieder auf die Beine zu kommen.Greece can not be saved with a debt rescheduling only. The country should not be decoupled from the capital market, the economy must be able to recuperate and grow. With money only, the Greek problem cannot be solved. We need an industrialization plan for Greece, a kind of Marshall Plan. Labour and production from all across Europe should be relocated to the country. What argument is there against outsourcing factories to Greece rather than Eastern Europe or Asia? This would greatly help the Greeks to get back on their feet.

(The same guy is advocating retirement at 69 in Germany, so he didn't suddenly became a leftie.)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Mon May 23rd, 2011 at 10:47:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Diekmann must actually believe in the EU, unlike Merkel.

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon May 23rd, 2011 at 10:48:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]

Display:

Occasional Series