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Shipping is so flush and bust that this alone might explain the different numbers from different sources. Their revenues are not a mystery either since many Greek shippers are public companies. Shipping could be 7% GDP recently, but again, right now business is a bust. It's easy to imagine revenues quadrupling (if not more) in a good economy, and then it becomes a higher % of GDP.

I'd really like to know about the Greek banks and the fact they were started by shipping magnates. What's the relationship between these banks and the shippers who started them. What kind of impact does this have on Greece? It seems to me, should the world economy get going again, the shippers themselves can recapitalize banks in a similar fashion if the old ones collapse, as long as their wealth isn't too closely tied to the banks they created.

by Upstate NY on Mon Jun 20th, 2011 at 09:36:34 AM EST
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Shipping revenue might increase but I don't remember seeing trustworthy figures over 12% GDP, ever. Do not forget all those patriotic Greek shipowners who have their vessels under many flags of opportunity and the number of their hqs in London...

But see this (p.6) and you realize that as far as shipping is concerned Greece is an international tax haven...

The road of excess leads to the palace of wisdom - William Blake

by talos (mihalis at gmail dot com) on Mon Jun 20th, 2011 at 06:57:46 PM EST
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So, not only do the shareholders pay no tax, but those working in the offices of these companies pay no tax either!
by Upstate NY on Mon Jun 20th, 2011 at 08:50:14 PM EST
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and of course the officers can pay the employees less, because they won't be taxed on it of course.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Jun 20th, 2011 at 08:56:31 PM EST
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I am fairly confident that a not insignificant percentage of higher paid members of staff are family or sons/daughters/etc of serious people / potential allies / partners. They would not be that poorly remunerated, I assume...

The road of excess leads to the palace of wisdom - William Blake
by talos (mihalis at gmail dot com) on Tue Jun 21st, 2011 at 10:04:45 AM EST
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Indeed, some of the public companies spread out pay to family members so it doesn't look like the CEO is taking a huge salary. This is the kind of stock that Wall Street loves because there's enough suspicion behind the company officers' motives to draw a lot of short interest. Plus, the fact the company is run by Greeks also attracts short interest. Then the mo-mo guys jump on board, pump the story when revenues in oil drilling and shipping come in, and they squeeze the shorts blind.

Wall Street loves stocks with big revenues and muddy stories. Pump and dump.

by Upstate NY on Tue Jun 21st, 2011 at 10:45:04 AM EST
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