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IMO, it won't help much.

When Complex societies collapse - as ours appears to be doing - they simplify.  Areas that supported hundreds of thousands or millions pre-collapse only support hundreds or thousands post-collapse.

Or none, as in the case of Chaco Canyon.

This is based on non-industrialized societies and we've only seen one system cascade collapse of an industrial society: The Great Depression.  

But we've never seen a cascade collapse with systematic multi-feedback loops, e.g., such as a collapse of global food production causing a collapse of raw resource extraction in Africa, etc., causing a collapse of First World manufacturing.  

The nearest I can come to it, others may be able to shed more light than I, was the collapse of the Celtic oppida in the Second and First BC.  In that time a relatively high degree of urbanization across Europe quickly collapsed, wrecking large scale manufacture (of fibulae, among other things), causing a localization of manufacturing and other economic activity.  They didn't lose their technology, per se, but they did lose the mass-market and other economic networks that made widespread, large scale, urbanization possible.  Towns still existed but they reverted to a lower scale of influence and depopulated.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Tue Aug 2nd, 2011 at 07:02:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
But we've never seen a cascade collapse with systematic multi-feedback loops, e.g., such as a collapse of global food production causing a collapse of raw resource extraction in Africa, etc., causing a collapse of First World manufacturing.  

 The nearest I can come to it, others may be able to shed more light than I, was the collapse of the Celtic oppida in the Second and First BC.

The collapse of British hegemony in the first two decades of the previous century, and the resulting rollback of international trade in the Interbellum.

While industrial society as a whole did survive that experience (albeit a couple of hundred million of its inhabitants and half the global capital plant poorer), it was entirely too close a shave for me to feel sanguine about its repetition.

- Jake

Austerity can only be implemented in the shadow of a concentration camp.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Thu Aug 4th, 2011 at 04:15:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
it was entirely too close a shave for me to feel sanguine about its repetition.

Mr Understatement has spoken. :p

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.

by Starvid on Thu Aug 4th, 2011 at 04:33:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
While we're recreating the 1930's, let's have a rerun of political violence on the streets of Spain in the run-up to the Civil War: The Madrid PP is considering to call out their 90 thousand members to confront the indignants
In statements to Europa Press, the Madrid PP Secretary General has denounced that "300 indignants are affecting the life of over 3 million inhabitants" of a city like Madrid. And, against that number of demonstrators, he pointed out that in this region only the PP has over 90 thousant members. "I hope the Government delevate, Dolores Carrión, doesn't object to us demonstrating, because then it would be a clear comparative grievance", he added.


Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Aug 4th, 2011 at 06:12:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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