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A Fistful of Euros: Could There Really Be A Recession Risk In Germany? (August 4, 2011)
It is the monthly manufacturing PMI chart, and note the sharp smooth downward line, which stretches from February's high point of 62.7, down to July's 52. Yes, German manufacturing industry is still expanding, but only just, and it is the pace of the slowdown which is remarkable.

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In Germany movements in GDP follow movements in the rate of expansion of exports. Let's not get into why that is for the moment (think Germany's particular demography), and just consider the possibility, despite all the talk over the years of Germany finally "decoupling", that it can't. Export dependence could well be the key explantaion for why the performance of the German economy is so "extreme" and so volatile, with quarters of record growth being witnessed just before the onset of substantial recessions, recessions which often register record falls in output only to be followed by massive recoveries. The reality is not that Germany is either a growth or a contraction champion, but that export dependency simply makes the German economy more volatile and more susceptible to sudden changes than those of some of its neighbours (like France).

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But why do you insist that this won't simply be a slow patch, or a soft spot? Even the bundesbank is saying that German growth in the second half of the year won't be as strong as in the first half. Well, here comes exhibit B. The slowdown is global, and for an economy which needs growing exports to grow, then a global slowdown is a real problem.



Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Aug 11th, 2011 at 03:56:12 AM EST
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