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President Giorgio Napolitano says whatever happens, reforms will continue

Why have elections if they won't change policy?

by oliver on Fri Dec 7th, 2012 at 04:36:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The fact that the policies seem to have made Mario Monti of all people less popular than Beppe Grillo or Burlesqueoni is obviously not enough to give Europe's 'leaders' pause.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Dec 7th, 2012 at 04:38:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
... Bersani warns about a possible Italian government collapse ...

Pier Luigi Bersani admits that Monti's government is on the verge of a breakup after Berlusconi's actions, which he called completely irresponsible, as L'Unità reports. The PD's Senate whip, Anna Finocchiaro, said that if the government no longer has a majority, Monti should go to the Quirinale for consultations with Giorgio Napolitano. If early elections come, they would take place in February instead of May.

... and Napolitano says Italy will avoid the worst case

In Italy, all powers rest with the president during times of political crises. Napolitano yesterday tried to bring back some calm by saying yesterday that there will be no change in economic policies, La Repubblica reports. He said he was ready to talk with Berlusconi, Bersani and Monti to guarantee the viability of the current government. But he ruled out early elections.



I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Dec 7th, 2012 at 04:40:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
In effect Alfano pulled the support of PDL for the Monti government. However Monti replied immediately that if he's going, he'll go only through a vote in parliament-- and he still has the numbers to go ahead with his government. So it's going to be backroom jockeying the next days so everyone can take off for Christmas recess earlier.

Three things may have provoked B to act. On one account he has trials gnawing away his empire.  His companies are doing very badly now that he's out of power. Two, there is a remote possibility that his electoral law will be changed. By withdrawing support, any electoral reform would be out the window. Italians would be called once again to vote in a national farce in which they really have no sovereignty. Further, he feels that all the other reforms are against his interests and has successfully rendered most reforms toothless by remaining in the coalition. Now that everyone has been bled by Monti, he can come back and reap whatever marginal benefits this may bring. Three, Alfano and his ragged army of conservatives intended to hold primaries in a week. It too would have been a farce for a personal political entity to choose a successor to the guy who owns the party. Primaries for the right would have had next to nothing turnout for a straggling bunch of wannabe's. A fourth reason is that seeing how Monti's popularity is at an all time low and the Democratic Party's approval rating is at an all time high, B's instinct is to tip over the table and be the center of attention, the wanker ready to save Italy from Monti's austerity and the usual bullshit about commies.

It is highly unlikely that he would win the upcoming elections but he would be in a position to make it difficult for any future left-center government to govern.

by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Fri Dec 7th, 2012 at 10:54:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
"It is highly unlikely that he would win the upcoming elections but he would be in a position to make it difficult for any future left-center government to govern."

How so? With the PD getting 15%, perhaps 20%?

by IM on Fri Dec 7th, 2012 at 01:01:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think you mean the PDL getting 20%. With the present electoral law, it's the coalition that is formed before the election that matters. The PDL- Berlusconi's personal political entity- would still have the majority within the coalition he will put together. So he'll be the boss of a mob of senile pirates. With all this pre-formed coalition crap, coupled with blocked lists that can only be tinkered with by party bosses, not the voters, there will be three or four groups in parliament made up of several dozen "parties" created ad hoc to have post-electoral leverage. The ruling coalition, which will be center-left, will have a thin majority.

It will be Prodi all over again with a Berlusconi who will simply buy up deputies and senators. After all, none will elected to their respective seats, nothing is due the electorate. An MP's loyality is only to whoever up high chose him to be MP and with that sort of mentality money talks.

The present electoral law makes for governance under blackmail.

by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Fri Dec 7th, 2012 at 01:32:38 PM EST
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