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Fascinating article about the neural and emotional  processes of building habits and how companies, specifically Target, uses these habits to influence buying decisions.  

How Companies Learn Your Secrets

by ElaineinNM on Mon Feb 20th, 2012 at 05:18:25 PM EST
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Wow. That is truly a fascinating article. I hope it will help me in changing/building certain habits and routines.  It went beyond what I expected from the title.  Thanks, Elaine

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Tue Feb 21st, 2012 at 03:09:09 AM EST
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Yes, I was thinking the same thing.  Now what is the cue to stop sitting on the internet???  

I think people manipulation is fascinating: sales and marketing, and especially politics. I had no idea how much I was being manipulated by stores, though.  I get a Staples coupon for poster printing just before I'm due to have a bunch printed for the concert series that I chair.  How do they know my schedule!!!  Now of course I wait for the coupon before I order.  

by ElaineinNM on Tue Feb 21st, 2012 at 12:42:46 PM EST
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Skinner is long gone, but cues > habitual response > bio-reward > neural hardwiring lives on.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Tue Feb 21st, 2012 at 04:17:26 AM EST
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Just a bit of trivia..  my Mom got a master's degree from Harvard in the early 1940's and took a couple of classes from Skinner.  His daughter of the Skinner's Box fame talked to the class and said that she didn't resent being isolated, or feel that she had any lasting psychological problems from the treatment.  My Mom said that Skinner was a "thoroughly disagreeable professor"...which probably meant that she didn't get an A.  
by ElaineinNM on Tue Feb 21st, 2012 at 12:23:40 PM EST
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(I was forced to use the ungrammatical apostrophe)

Oh, I lurv trivia. With me, you can shovel it on.

Skinner, not unlike many other scientists, but in a lower percentage than among corporate executives, was a sociopath - though the sociopathy of scientists emerges from different behaviours.

IMHO being a sociopath does not exclude you from having interesting insights - it may even be an advantage to have a distorted view of the questions that are worth asking.

Genius (when not self-described) has one of two sources: a physiological abnormality or a perceived physiological abnormality. The nutter and the compensating nutter.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Tue Feb 21st, 2012 at 02:02:20 PM EST
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???

tens of millions of people stand to see their lives ruined because the bureaucrats at the ECB don't understand introductory economics -- Dean Baker
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Feb 21st, 2012 at 02:10:31 PM EST
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I'm banned from using smileys, so you'll just have to Rorschach it.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Tue Feb 21st, 2012 at 03:04:46 PM EST
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Aren't you conflating asocial and antisocial, not to speak of sociopathic?

tens of millions of people stand to see their lives ruined because the bureaucrats at the ECB don't understand introductory economics -- Dean Baker
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Feb 21st, 2012 at 03:34:14 PM EST
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The Guardian: I was not a lab rat (by Deborah Skinner Buzan, 12 March 2004)
I loved my father dearly. He was fantastically devoted and affectionate. But perhaps the stories about me would never have started if he had done a better job with his public image. He believed that, although our genes determine who we are, it is mostly our environment that shapes our personality. A Time Magazine cover story ran the headline "BF Skinner says we can't afford freedom". All he had said was that controls are an everyday reality - traffic lights and a police force, for instance - and that we need to organise our social structures in ways that create more positive controls and fewer aversive ones. As is clear from his utopian novel, Walden Two, the furthest thing from his mind was a totalitarian or fascist state.

His careless descriptions of the aircrib might have contributed to the public's common misconception as well. He was too much the scientist and too little the self-publicist - especially hazardous when you are already a controversial figure. He used the word "apparatus" to describe the aircrib, the same word he used to refer to his experimental "Skinner" boxes for rats and pigeons.

The effect on me? Who knows? I was a remarkably healthy child, and after the first few months of life only cried when injured or inoculated. I didn't have a cold until I was six. I've enjoyed good health since then, too, though that may be my genes. Frankly, I'm surprised the contraption never took off. A few aircribs were built during the late 50s and 60s, and somebody also produced plans for DIY versions, but the traditional cot was always going to be a smaller and cheaper option. My sister used one for her two daughters, as did hundreds of other couples, mostly with some connection to psychology.



tens of millions of people stand to see their lives ruined because the bureaucrats at the ECB don't understand introductory economics -- Dean Baker
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Feb 21st, 2012 at 06:05:28 PM EST
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