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...for all of it?
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 11:56:47 AM EST
or even any of it ?

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 12:48:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Basically, we are tubes with a hole at either end. Energy is absorbed at one end and waste emitted from the other. Everything else is detail to the basic concept.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 03:14:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Happy now?

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 03:14:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You described an animal. For humans, you have to account for the soul.

I wonder if the Vatican has repeated any of those experiments where they weighed dying people to find out how much the soul weighs. One would think with modern instrumentation it would be pretty easy to detect...

by asdf on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 03:29:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The soul has no weight. If you weigh a person a little before he died and then immediately after death, you will see that we have the same weight. But the soul has left the body at the same time to expire. Then the soul has no weight. Q.E.D.
by PerCLupi on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 04:07:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The soul could well be like Phlogiston and have a negative weight.

If you are not convinced, try it on someone who has not been entirely debauched by economics. — Piero Sraffa
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 04:10:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
http://www.snopes.com/religion/soulweight.asp

science is the study of the natural world, not the supernatural...

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 05:16:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Right, my point exactly. So a handful of clearly unsatisfactory experiments 100 years ago don't prove anything one way or the other. The Vatican should be pursuing this with some vigor!

For example: Does a Pope's soul weigh more than a mortal's soul? How about a Cardinal's? How about one where the Cardinal was a child molester?

So many unanswered questions...

by asdf on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 06:16:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
certainly the Vat-of-Godde should get involved... after all, that laughable 'research' suggests they are right about dogs not having souls.

idjits

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 06:31:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yeah, or it could be like dark energy, and make things expand. Why didn't the church think up that one, eh?

Seriously, you could explain all sorts of stuff if you had decent soul-detecting instrumentation. Useful in future witch trials, for one thing: "Well, when we poisoned her for being a witch, she didn't lose the weight of her soul, so she must not have had one, so she was a witch." Modern technology in witch-hunting.

Just another example of how Krauss is right about religion...

by asdf on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 06:25:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't think this, from March, has been posted here:

The (Many) Things Macroeconomists Don't Know - Justin Fox - Harvard Business Review

Jean-Claude Trichet, now a few months into retirement, has no regrets about his eight-year tenure as president of the European Central Bank. At least, that's what he said at Harvard's Kennedy School Thursday night when a student asked him point blank. "I don't regret anything," was the response.

But listening to the full talk (when there's video, it will be available here), it was clear that Trichet did regret something about the last few years. He regrets that economists didn't give him better advice.

What Trichet said was that state-of-the-art macroeconomic theory was almost entirely useless in dealing with the crisis that began in 2007. Yeah, he tried to be polite about it: "This doesn't mean we have to abandon DSGE," he said, referring to the dynamic-stochastic general equilibrium models -- in which an economy of rational, far-seeing actors struggles with the occasional friction or shock, but generally gets along okay -- that dominated the work of economists at central banks. Buuut "atomistic rational agents [the figures that populate DSGE models] don't capture behavior during a crisis." Another quote: "Rational expectations theory has brought macroeconomics a long way ... but there is a clear case to reexamine the assumptions." And neither of these approaches leaves room for the possibility that financial market fluctuations could be the source of problems for the real economy.

Trichet finally reached for the last refuge of the frustrated economic policymaker: John Maynard Keynes. He quoted (at length) a famous story from Keynes' General Theory. It describes a beauty contest in a newspaper where the goal is to pick the face that the most readers will vote for.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 11:58:43 AM EST
DSGE is a perfectly good theory.

Too bad it's worthless.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 12:25:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And I've followed it impeccably. Impeccably!

If you are not convinced, try it on someone who has not been entirely debauched by economics. — Piero Sraffa
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 12:30:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
What future awaits you, if you follow impeccably something that is worthless?
by PerCLupi on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 02:46:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
He will shortly be appointed to the Board of Governors of the ECB, of course.

Or the Vatican.

Watch this space.

The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman

by dvx (dvx.clt ät gmail dotcom) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 03:24:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Pope, the better. He has relatives in the fullest sense, and His relatives should not live badly. I go to bed calm and hopeful.
by PerCLupi on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 04:26:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You may not be familiar with this video: Here's The Angry Trichet Moment That Everyone's Talking About (Sep. 8, 2011)

What Trichet got for sticking impeccably to something worthless is a Charlemagne Prize.

If you are not convinced, try it on someone who has not been entirely debauched by economics. — Piero Sraffa

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 03:32:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Your father should have done with you, what David Cameron has done with his daughter.
by PerCLupi on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 03:05:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
is that even Alan Greenspan had (albeit briefly) greater awareness.

If you are not convinced, try it on someone who has not been entirely debauched by economics. — Piero Sraffa
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 12:38:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"This doesn't mean we have to abandon DSGE,"

I guess we could keep DSGE around for those rare times when the economy seems to be in equilibrium, with caveats from Minsky, but, if we want an economic theory and a models that actually possess analytic and predictive power they must incorporate money, credit, debt, time and multiple actors in a dynamic format. DSGE was stillborn with massive congenital defects. Isn't it enough that we have spent decades worshiping a deceased fetus?

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 03:09:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 12:31:57 PM EST
What do you think about Swipe now that you've been using it for awhile?

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 12:37:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thank you for asking.

I Like Swipe.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 02:22:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Y lyke swype?

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Tue Jun 12th, 2012 at 02:16:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Swipe?

Dunno. Do you mean Swype? In which case, I don't use it.

If it's some other Swipe, then I have no knowledge of that about which you speak.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 04:23:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Swipe.

Has been threatening to eliminate all other cleaning products for fifty years.

Was (possibly still is) "direct sold" in a pyramid system.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 04:39:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I mis-remembered the name of the Product too.  (Also.)

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 05:10:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I mis-remembered who was touting it.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 05:09:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's not the heat, it's the humidity.

Evan though the temp is barely 20 C (70F) the humidity outside is over 80%.  And I'm toasting. How can it simulatneously be so humid, and still we're in a drought?  Arghhh!

And I'll give my consent to any government that does not deny a man a living wage-Billy Bragg

by ManfromMiddletown (manfrommiddletown at lycos dot com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 12:43:39 PM EST

Or not.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 12:53:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
England 1 France 1

Although from scorers  it's Man city 1 Man City 1

England have had their moments, but by and large I think that Frane are the side with the extra gear, but they're having problems making it count.

Milner should be told not to cross the halfway line cos he looks hopeless once he's expected to run with the ball.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 12:55:18 PM EST
Well, it all fizzled out quite tamely in the end.

I think the ref will need to look at himself cos he was showing a teensy bit of partiality to the French who seemed to be able to commit professional blocking fouls with impunity but would book any england player who tackled. The UK commentators were getting quite sarcastic about it towards the end

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 01:57:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm firmly on the position of not listening to comentators on any game where the home side is involved

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 03:34:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
altho technically during this competition theyre the away side, but you know what I mean

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 09:32:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
European Parliament press release: EP hits out over tactic to exclude MEPs from Schengen decision (08-06-2012)

EP president Martin Schulz said: "In a Union of states and citizens, it is disturbing to see that national governments seek to exclude the citizens' representatives on matters relating to individual rights. Free movement within an area without internal borders is a pillar of the European Union - one of its most tangible benefits - and the European Parliament will fight to strengthen it."

What happened

EU justice and home affairs  ministers decided on 7 June to change the legal base for the rules governing the evaluation of Schengen from article 77 from the Treaty on the Functioning of the EU to article 70. This changes the Parliament's role from co-decision to information. Instead of the Parliament and the Commission being able to exercise their supervisory role on behalf of citizens on something that will affect everyone, member states will now be able to ignore the concerns and improvements they brings up.  The decision was taken while negotiations with the other institutions were still ongoing.

...

The Parliament  has invited the Danish Presidency to the plenary session in Strasbourg next week to discuss the decision. It will continue with the legal procedure on this draft legislation, including a vote by the civil liberties committee on the Schengen Governance Package in Strasbourg on Monday 11 June at 1900 CET. It will also look at what legal options are available, including asking the European Court of Justice to examine the decision.



If you are not convinced, try it on someone who has not been entirely debauched by economics. — Piero Sraffa
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 01:43:28 PM EST
"In a Union of states and citizens, it is disturbing to see that national governments seek to exclude the citizens' representatives on matters relating to individual rights."
-Ergo, there is no Union of States and Citizens.

There has been no Europe; there is no Europe; there will be no Europe.

by PerCLupi on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 02:32:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
But the citizens may feel that their national governments represent them better than the European parliament.
by oliver on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 04:20:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Of course, because the European Parliament is a "parliament" of a non-state.
But really, I wonder if vote our national politicians serves a useful purpose today. And I'm a strong democrat.
by PerCLupi on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 04:45:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
same difference...

national governments are as captured as the EU central control is.

there is no equivalent of the american founding fathers here, no heroic constitution, no epic bill of rights to light the pages of history.

just empty suit technocrats and recycled pablum.

if the EU was created out of the fear of repeating WW1 and 2, it's like thinking removing a negative is the same as creating a positive.

it helps sure, but it only goes half way, like thinking that peace is no more than the absence of war.

or that just giving up smoking is enough to create healthy lungs.

maybe this first run at creating the EU was only real usefulness has been to show us what not to do when/if we give it another shot.

i always thought is was a rehearsal for a one-world democracy anyway, to be scaled up when proven viable,  we could even be just crash test dummies to help design a safer social chassis and a better armatured democratic engine.

dump usury-peddling bankers and armament makers out of the new version, then change the source fuels to intelligent ones, then stand back!

kruggers is doing an interview on Rai 1, saying the EU lending money to the spanish government to bail out their banks will just worsen the situation.

whodathunkit?

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 05:34:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The EP might try to kill the Commission by refusing it funding and rejecting all of its actions, but I doubt that would create serious obstacles. The national governments would just provide funding around the EP. It seems obvious they only want popular representation for PR reasons.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 03:14:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The EP can fire the Commission.

Von überall könnte das Volk, Urbrut alles Undemokratischen, Zelle des Terrors, über die gewählten Hüter von Wachstum und Wohlstand® kommen. - flatter
by generic on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 04:50:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's the Council that's at fault here.

If you are not convinced, try it on someone who has not been entirely debauched by economics. — Piero Sraffa
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 04:56:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And I'll bet they can't fire the Council.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 07:45:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The Council is another chamber in the legislative process, one that also combines the powers of the state governments and uses executive priviliges of the states to obfuscate and hide what they are doing from the parliaments (both EP and state).

So yes, the EP can not fire the Council.

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES!

by A swedish kind of death on Tue Jun 12th, 2012 at 08:45:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
krugman was making a lot of sense tonight.

he said hollande, monti and rajoy need to go to merkel and tell her to back off, or there's a 50% chance the euro will be dead within a year.

that 100 billion given to spain hasn't calmed the markets, they scent blood, and word is italy's next.

spread em!

if it's going to go down, better sooner than later, right?

wheee

PK also marvelled how this has turned into a morality play, with germany extolling 'virtue'.

the racial superiority complex of the last century has morphed into a moral one now.

will the yanks come over and save the day again?

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 06:27:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ok, this has to count as an epic WIN.

The Vice President invites the press and their families to his home at the Naval Observatory every year. My son's excuse for dousing David Brooks: "Biden told me to!"



And I'll give my consent to any government that does not deny a man a living wage-Billy Bragg
by ManfromMiddletown (manfrommiddletown at lycos dot com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 02:15:23 PM EST
Excellent, go get 'em Joe

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 02:21:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I've been selling and donating a bunch of possessions ahead of leaving to travel again in a month.

I'm down to two small boxes of books. They're all cookbooks, photography and massage related, or books that have deep personal meaning. This time around I cut all the way down into the "I swear I'm going to get back to this book" pile, which included a few that were going on a decade.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 02:15:50 PM EST
A decent library system would allow you to deposit books--for later retrieval if needed--and not have them immediately put into the surplus/discard pile for being too obscure or dated...
by asdf on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 03:31:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
that's mostly moot now with ebooks. I've bought one paper book in the past year and about 25 ebooks.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 04:10:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Wow, most of the books I read are not available electronically either because of subject matter or because of age.

For example, a few weeks ago I bought for $10 a copy of "Principles of direct current machines" by Langsdorf, 1940. A newer edition would have a more streamlined explanation of the math, but would not show the details of how to wind the coils in a DC generator. Is it available on line?

Or, how about "Low Power Communication" by Arland, 2009. It's a perfectly good newly published book. Available on line?

Set me straight, maybe I am wasting my money on trees...

by asdf on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 06:13:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I guess you still need paper books.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 06:26:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I will add that I have seen a really big uptick in what is being offered on the kindle over the 18 months I've had mine. A lot of semi-well known stuff from the mid to late 20th century is available now.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Tue Jun 12th, 2012 at 01:00:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]

Traveling back to Porvoo from the MindLab opening with the film crew, I had the chance to test out a handy lens for the iPhone.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 02:48:46 PM EST
David Cameron forgot his daughter in a pub. The future is in pubs?!
by PerCLupi on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 03:00:32 PM EST
as many people have been saying, he's practicing his forgetfulness ready for his appearance before lord Justice Leveson later this week.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 03:36:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
We know a song about that



keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 03:40:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
If you do pubs properly, you cn forget anything

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 03:37:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
This is more of a commentary on the competence of the SAS (?) bodyguards...

I'm also puzzled though because I thought the UK didn't allow 8 year olds in bars.

by asdf on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 03:42:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There are some pubs (though Helen will object to putting them under that classification) which serve food and have a "family" section not adjacent to the bar and which admits children.

If you are not convinced, try it on someone who has not been entirely debauched by economics. — Piero Sraffa
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 03:44:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A pub is a pub, some are good, most are crap for various reasons, mostly to do with lousy beer. I don't actually object to children in a pub except when they mess about on the pool table, which is just annoying.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 05:01:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The traditional Japanese drinking establishment is the Izakaya.  It's rather food oriented - you go there in a group, and eat and drink with your group at the same time, instead of or after dinner.

Izakayas are quite often family friendly, and a family or two with kids will all go in together.  The kids will run around and frolic, the parents will get smashed, the other patrons will ignore them, and everyone goes home happy.

by Zwackus on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 09:57:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Iceland Court Sentences Ex-Byr Savings Executives to Jail

Byr Savings Bank former Chairman Jon Thorsteinn Jonsson and the lender's ex-Chief Executive Officer Ragnar Zophonias Gudjonsson were today found guilty of fraud and sentenced to four and half years in prison by Iceland's Supreme Court.
The court found that the two former executives had used their positions at Byr to grant an 800-million kronur ($6.2 million) loan to Exeter Holdings ehf in 2008 as Iceland's financial system was on the brink of collapse.

Proceeds of the loan were used by Exeter to buy Jonsson's and Gudjonsson's shares in Byr. Exeter guaranteed the loan by putting the Byr shares up as collateral.


Perhaps the Greeks were right about the maximum size of a self-governing polis.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 03:32:23 PM EST
Monbiot: Moral Failings June 11, 2012
This was the point at which I understood that people of the same neighbourhood can entertain very different conceptions of morality. It is a theme upon which the psychologist Jonathan Haidt expands, fascinatingly and persuasively, in his book The Righteous Mind. And it is the theme upon which he stumbles, stupidly and disastrously, when seeking to apply his findings to politics, as he did in the Guardian last week, and as he has done to great effect within the Democratic Party.

Drawing on a wealth of experimental evidence, Haidt argues that we tend to make moral decisions on the basis of intuition rather than strategic reasoning. We then use our capacity for reason to find justifications for the decisions we have already made. "Our moral thinking," he says, "is much more like a politician searching for votes than a scientist searching for truth".

See also the discussion in an earlier ET Salon of a review on _The Righteous Mind:
Haidt's analysis has been taken up enthusiastically on both sides of the Atlantic. But his admirers appear to have missed something. While the psychological findings he presents are well-attested and thoroughly referenced, he offers not a shred of evidence to support his political contentions, either in the article or in his book. His claims are unsourced, unsubstantiated and plain wrong.

...

If Haidt and his admirers were right, the correct political strategy would be for Labour, the Democrats and other once-progressive parties to swing even further to the right, triangulate even more furiously, and - by seeking to satisy an apparent appetite for loyalty, authority and sanctity - to join the opposing tribe. But if the real problem is not that working class voters have switched their voting preferences but that they are not voting at all because there's too little at stake, then the correct political prescription is to do the opposite: to swing further to the left and to emphasise not "order and national greatness" but care and economic justice.



If you are not convinced, try it on someone who has not been entirely debauched by economics. — Piero Sraffa
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 03:56:01 PM EST
Jonathan Haidt: Why working-class people vote conservative (The Guardian, 5 June 2012)
Why on Earth would a working-class person ever vote for a conservative candidate? This question has obsessed the American left since Ronald Reagan first captured the votes of so many union members, farmers, urban Catholics and other relatively powerless people - the so-called "Reagan Democrats". Isn't the Republican party the party of big business? Don't the Democrats stand up for the little guy, and try to redistribute the wealth downwards?

Many commentators on the left have embraced some version of the duping hypothesis: the Republican party dupes people into voting against their economic interests by triggering outrage on cultural issues. "Vote for us and we'll protect the American flag!" say the Republicans. "We'll make English the official language of the United States! And most importantly, we'll prevent gay people from threatening your marriage when they ... marry! Along the way we'll cut taxes on the rich, cut benefits for the poor, and allow industries to dump their waste into your drinking water, but never mind that. Only we can protect you from gay, Spanish-speaking flag-burners!"

One of the most robust findings in social psychology is that people find ways to believe whatever they want to believe. And the left really want to believe the duping hypothesis. It absolves them from blame and protects them from the need to look in the mirror or figure out what they stand for in the 21st century.



If you are not convinced, try it on someone who has not been entirely debauched by economics. — Piero Sraffa
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 03:57:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
This is a dumbed-down version of Lakoff.

Also, as the comments point out, if you have toxic media you get toxic voting patterns. The Left don't have anything to equal Fux News or the many media fronts of the Kochs.

Plus, some people are just stupid. Also.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 04:21:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
But kudos to Monbiot for digging up evidence that there's no evidence that people are voting as Haidt says they are.

If you are not convinced, try it on someone who has not been entirely debauched by economics. — Piero Sraffa
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 04:29:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, I'm very glad to see someone take on Haidt's sleight of hand.

Although it's not just in the voting patterns, it's in his original conception, because he doesn't actually present evidence that his six attributes are independent - it looks a lot more like there are two independent attributes there in fact. At which point, he's not actually telling us anything that Altemeyer did not already.

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 06:31:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Will the EU manage to destroy the Eurozone before the Greek vote next Sunday, or before Spain actually signs the Memorandum of Understanding for the bailoutusury?

If you are not convinced, try it on someone who has not been entirely debauched by economics. — Piero Sraffa
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 04:02:45 PM EST
Yes.

(This has been another edition of Simple Answers to Simple Questions.)

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 06:09:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ulrike Guérot: Europa braucht Großzügigkeit, nicht Härte (Deutschlandradio, 11.06.2012)
Manchmal hilft es, Wahrheiten auszusprechen und sie mit einem einschlägigen Begriff zu versehen. Der diesjährige Karlspreis-Laureat, Wolfgang Schäuble, hat sich mit seinem Plädoyer für eine politische Union wohltuend abgehoben von der Euro-Schelte eines Thilo Sarrazin. In Zeiten, in denen Europa-Kritik zur politischen Grundbefindlichkeit zu gehören scheint, fordert er neue Institutionen für die EU. Das ist bemerkenswert.

...

Schäuble nennt hierfür die Elemente: die Direktwahl des europäischen Präsidenten, eine gleiche und allgemeine Wahl zum Europäischen Parlament und ein Initiativrecht für letzteres, dazu eine zweite, degressiv proportionale Länderkammer sowie die Abschaffung des Entsenderechts für EU-Kommissare.

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Und noch eins: Hegemonie funktioniert mit Großzügigkeit, nicht mit Härte. Deutschland müsste also bereit sein, seine wirtschaftliche Stärke mit dem politischen Resonanzboden Europas zu verbinden, es müsste den Euro in den Dienst politischer Stärke Europas stellen. Und vor allem müsste Deutschland verstehen - und zwar bald! -, dass Geld, und damit auch der Euro, politisch ist. Europa kann nicht von der Europäischen Zentralbank regiert werden.

Europe needs generosity, not harshness (Deutschlandradio, 11.06.2012)
Sometimes it helps to speak out truths and to provide them with a relevant term. This year's Charlemagne Prize winner, Wolfgang Schäuble, has with his plea for a political Union wholesomely distanced himself from the  Euro-scolding os Thilo Sarrazin. In times in which criticism of Europe seems to be part of the political ground state, he [Schaeuble] demands new institutions for te EU. This is remarkable.

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Schäuble names the elements [of a political union]: the direct election of the European president, an even and general vote for the European parliament and a right of initiative for the latter, with a second proportional territorial house and the removal of the right of initiative form the EU Commission.

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And more: Hegemony works with generodity, not with harshness. Germany should also be ready to tie its economic strenght to the sounding board of Europe, it should put the Euro at the service of a politically stronger Europe. And above all Germany should understand - and quickly! - that money, and the Euro too, is political. Europe cannot be ruled by the European Central Bank.



If you are not convinced, try it on someone who has not been entirely debauched by economics. — Piero Sraffa
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 04:28:28 PM EST
The Economist: Just don't call it a bail-out (June 10th 2012)
WHATEVER the €100 billion ($126 billion) made available by euro-zone countries to recapitalise Spain's banks looks like, the Spanish government would really rather not call it that. "In no way is this a rescue," said Luis de Guindos, Spain's economy minister, while announcing that a deal to rescue Spain's banks had been done in a two-and-a-half-hour conference call with the 17 euro-zone finance ministers on June 9th. "It's a loan with very favourable conditions." The prime minister, Mariano Rajoy (pictured above), who left his underling to front the bail-out, was meanwhile busy giving the impression that all was proceeding as normal. When he eventually appeared before the press the following day, Mr Rajoy made repeated reference to "what happened yesterday", as if the rescue were an embarrassing incident that, out of politeness, ought not to be mentioned by name. Then he flew to Poland to watch some football.

This was understandable, given the importance of confidence to banking, if slightly comical. Yet it was also emblematic of Spain's approach to its banking crisis, characterised by a mixture of bluster and denial that has ultimately proved to be self-defeating. The good news is that this loan signals that the country is at last facing up to the problems in its banking sector. A hundred billion euros is at the high end of what most analysts estimate is required and should be enough to protect Spanish banks against further shocks.



If you are not convinced, try it on someone who has not been entirely debauched by economics. — Piero Sraffa
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 04:57:44 PM EST
via http://www.thepoke.co.uk/2012/06/10/one-of-the-best-tv-moments-ever/



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 05:10:08 PM EST
The presenter didn't even blink...that's professional

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Jun 12th, 2012 at 02:53:10 AM EST
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If you are not convinced, try it on someone who has not been entirely debauched by economics. — Piero Sraffa

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 05:35:29 PM EST
Forest fire update.

40,000 acres (16,187 hectares), 0% contained although there is active fire fighting along the southwest border attempting to keep it from sweeping into the town of Ruidoso.  

The usual gang of know-nothing fuckheads who last Monday were screaming for government cut-backs are now screaming the gov'mint should have put it out.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 06:03:27 PM EST
Well you know every single tax dollar should have been spent on fire fighting

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2012 at 09:35:10 PM EST
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Same people who only drive on corporate roads

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Jun 12th, 2012 at 02:52:29 AM EST
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