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I have a job relating the quasi-fascist, ultra-colonialist, resource-rich South Africa at the end of apartheid with Europe in 1992.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Nov 1st, 2014 at 04:46:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The two do not have to be equated for the comparison to fit.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Nov 1st, 2014 at 09:52:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Depends on how loosely one likes to think.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Nov 2nd, 2014 at 01:44:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It seems to me that, everywhere we have private banking, when it is time to make serious constitutional decisions, the economic structures and arrangements are usually decided by those with expertise in these subjects and to their benefit.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Nov 2nd, 2014 at 11:44:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Hm, ok.

I see a general pattern where you have politicians stuck in a business-as-usual frame, who produce complicated systems of economic regulations that just happens to be neoliberal dogma. The politicians may not mean to legislate neoliberal dogma into law, the politicians may be stuck in some other frame. But then as the pieces fall into place the system gets set into neoliberalism.

So if Delors et al did not mean for it to be neoliberal trap, then who wrote the damn thing? If it is similar to the examples in South Africa, Latin America and East Europe that the Shock Doctrine covers some economists with ties to the Chicago school are likely to have delivered it in some form. "You need a currency union? Here we have one, made just for you! Lots of boring details here that you don't need to know, what you need to decide is what to call it and what symbols to use."

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Sun Nov 2nd, 2014 at 02:27:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
After 1980 the consensus of the economic profession was "neoliberal".

Joseph Stiglitz in Globalization and its Discontents has an interesting description of how the IMF and World Bank gor gradually purged of their old Keynesian staff and replaced it with the "Washington Consensus" we know and love.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Nov 2nd, 2014 at 04:59:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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