Welcome to the new version of European Tribune. It's just a new layout, so everything should work as before - please report bugs here.
Display:
However I could see a real panic developing if a hard Brexit takes place and tariff and non-tariff barriers are set up particularly in high tariff industries like food. Some very rapid re-locations of some parts of UK businesses to Ireland and Irish Businesses to UK could be required to facilitate continues market access and reduced tariffs.

Unless the UK stays in the single market border controls are almost unavoidable. The UK is then a "third party country" and regulatory conformity is then only a necessary but not sufficient condition for imports to the EU.

Search "Veterinary border inspection posts". They are tasked to inspect "live animals" and "products of animal origin". For imports from third party countries that is the point of entry to the EU.

Ireland right now has three of them. Shannon airport, Dublin airport and Dublin harbour.
https://ec.europa.eu/food/sites/food/files/animals/docs/bips_contact_ireland.pdf

Ireland would need additional ones along the border to Northern Ireland.

And while obviously there are more in continental Europe (France, Belgium, Netherlands and Germany) they don´t have the size either to inspect British exports to the EU after Brexit.

Something that neither the British government nor the British farmers seem to realize.

And the EU can´t make an exception for the UK because if they do, they would have to relax inspections for WTO members too. WTO non-discrimination rules.

by Detlef (Detlef1961_at_yahoo_dot_de) on Fri Oct 20th, 2017 at 02:27:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Revenue says post-Brexit Border will need eight customs checkpoints
A possible option is an e-flow-style automatic number plate recognition (ANPR) system that would allow vehicles carrying goods to move from the Republic to the North and vice-versa without having to stop in cases where a pre-departure/arrival declaration has been lodged and green-routed, it suggests.

For such a system to work with it would require an interface between both countries' electronic systems, the report adds.

Whether such a system can be commissioned and installed in time is not known but Revenue says an analysis must be conducted to establish the cost and the practicalities of such before proceeding.

It also says clarification would be required from the European Commission as to what extent a camera-based system could be considered to meet this requirement.

It adds: "In any event, a physical customs presence would still be required to engage with legitimate traders and to meet a range of EU obligations.

"Regardless of any efficiency arising from an ANPR system, the inevitability of certain consignments being routed other than green and goods or documents having to be examined would still require investment in suitable facilities at all designated crossing points."



Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Fri Oct 20th, 2017 at 03:56:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I´m a tiny bit skeptical.

From what I´ve read the UK before Brexit was already in the process of developing and introducing a new system for customs transactions. I think the goal was to boost capabilities from 60 or 90 million transactions per year to 150 million. And of course it was planned long before the referendum with EU tariffs and regulations in mind. Estimates seem to say that after Brexit Britain will need a system with a capacity of 300 to 350 million transactions per year.

The British will have to change their not-yet-ready system on the fly. And given what I know of government IT projects in Germany, I would expect the project to be late and wastly more expensive than planned.

And of course the system needs to be compatible with the Irish system. We´ll also need a whole new system of identifying regular "trusted traders" who can use the system. How to deal with tariffs and VAT. How to avoid VAT fraud.
And even assuming the ANPR works as advertised, how do you control the rest of the border?

And I think the problem with farm animals was only mentioned (partly hidden) in:

"Regardless of any efficiency arising from an ANPR system, the inevitability of certain consignments being routed other than green and goods or documents having to be examined would still require investment in suitable facilities at all designated crossing points."

Veterinary border inspection posts for the inevitable examination of animals or products of animal origin are still necessary. And that would hurt Ireland quite a bit.

by Detlef (Detlef1961_at_yahoo_dot_de) on Sat Oct 21st, 2017 at 06:45:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Display:

Occasional Series