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I didn't see that coming.

And I don't really see any option working: minority government (lack of tradition), grand coalition (spd has ruled it out) or new elections (polls show the same landscape as in the election).

Don't really see the position of the FDP improving either. Are they walking out in the hope of being called back for a better offer??

by fjallstrom on Mon Nov 20th, 2017 at 05:42:58 PM EST
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I am looking for insight as well.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Tue Nov 21st, 2017 at 02:02:05 AM EST
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Still unclear at the moment which directions have more support; new vote or further talks on GroKo (grand coalition); Merkel prefers new vote at the moment.

In the background is the effect of the AfD. In GroKo, AfD becomes the largest opposition, and no one (but perhaps seehofer) wants to give them that voice. FDP seems to want AfD voters in the next round.

Political systems are breaking (in some cases long since broken) round the globe. I didn't see this happening here in 'Schland.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

by Crazy Horse on Tue Nov 21st, 2017 at 10:17:22 AM EST
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Do we have any information on the substantial areas of policy dispute? Or is it mere political opportunism? I can't see there being huge ideological differences between the CDU and FDP...? Perhaps the FDP and Greens have diametrically opposed policy objectives and can't both be included in the same coalition?

Seems like AfD will be the net beneficiaries unless the German electorate take the view they have given Merkel a sufficiently bloody nose and warning as to future conduct and are happy to revert to business as normal after another election?

Or will AfD voters be energised by their success in disrupting 'business as usual'?  Will the SDP relent before or after another election?  Is this Schultz' last chance of a major role in German politics?

Index of Frank's Diaries

by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Tue Nov 21st, 2017 at 10:38:16 AM EST
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As far as i can read, the key policy differences were about climate politics and immigration. Greens wanted a quicker and greater stop for germany's idiotic clinging to coal; FDP (and the black parties) cared more about "job loss."

Greens were willing to have an annual cap on immigration (200K) if family members were also allowed to emigrate. The other parties wanted to look good to AfD voters, and wanted far stronger policies.

These issues weren't the only ones, but the strongest ones. Just now a Green leader said they were also considering a stop to negotiation.

"(Robert) Habeck widersprach auch dem Eindruck, dass zwischen Union und Grünen große Einigkeit in den Sondierungsgesprächen geherrscht habe. Es gehöre "einfach zur Wahrheit, dass die Gespräche unglaublich schwierig waren", sagte der Grünen-Politiker. "Es lag von Anfang an kein Segen drauf. Auch wir Grünen haben sicher mehr als ein Dutzend Mal an Abbruch gedacht, aber uns immer wieder mühsam zusammengerauft. Man sollte jetzt nicht so tun, als hätte die Sonne über Jamaika geschienen, wenn die FDP geblieben wäre."

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

by Crazy Horse on Tue Nov 21st, 2017 at 12:34:23 PM EST
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