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by Bjinse on Mon Nov 27th, 2017 at 09:13:26 PM EST
Today -100: December 1, 1917: Of measles, ensigns, knitting, and  Grecian Formula No. 4
The Netherlands adopts universal male suffrage and proportional representation and allows women to be elected to public office, though there is no women's suffrage.

  1. Depose monarch
  2. Institute assembly
  3. Convert male aristocrats to senators
  4. Select dudes with surplus cash to attend
  5. ...


Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Fri Dec 1st, 2017 at 07:21:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There is a wonderful ROFLOL reason as to why the Netherlands are not currently commemorating this. An entire organisation had already planned a centennial celebration, which would start this month and last for 2 years.

However, the female Speaker, Morocco-born Khadija Arib torpedoed the entire operation by succinctly and steadfastly pointing out that women suffrage was only accepted in 1919 - and that this should be the main focus of any celebration of suffrage, and most certainly not be the ending of one. Fumes and smoke, hot air and exploding heads could not budge her, and all the plans, including the Dutch king as guest of honour, were iced.

More power to her.

by Bjinse on Fri Dec 1st, 2017 at 09:38:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
This is somehow relevant:

Five Italian female professors on why Dutch women are lagging behind

As the antipasti is brought to the table, the women talk in amazement about how so many female professors at Radboud University come from abroad. When it comes to the exact sciences faculties, they make up nearly 100 percent. `I really don't understand it', says Alessandra Cambi, Professor of Cell Biology in the medical faculty. `Dutch childcare infrastructure is so good! You can have kids here without having Granddad and Nan in the neighbourhood, too.'

Mariani points out an economic reason: due to poverty and poor social facilities, Italian women have traditionally been accustomed to working. `In the Netherlands, that isn't necessary--the salaries are high enough.' Elena Marchiori, Professor of Machine Learning, nods: `It is precisely in the less economically developed countries that you see many women in science.'

Prosperity may act as a ceiling for equal rights. There is a reason these five Italian women feel that part-time work a Dutch phenomenon: `Ask the Dutch girls in secondary school how many hours they plan on working later in life and they'll tell you 28 hours.'

That may be why there are more working women here (65 percent in the Netherlands versus 49 percent in Italy), but creating a career this way is certainly harder. Cambi: `Getting a top position by working 3.5 days a week does not happen.'

Yet that part-timer principle is deeply embedded in the minds of Dutch women. `When my oldest son went to sign up for university day care, I was told that a maximum of three days per week is standard and good for your child. After that, it is difficult to say that you want four or five days.'

by das monde on Sat Dec 2nd, 2017 at 11:24:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
due to poverty and poor social facilities, Italian women have traditionally been accustomed to working.

This statement resonates in their comparisons of differing "work ethic" between Italy and Netherlands yet doesn't quite strike the chord of class dialectic that accompanies, to my ears, stereotype of prosperity and "growth" within the USA.

When I reached a certain age, I became more attuned to the ways in which female accountability to and visibility (empirical and canonical) in the US the labor force is predicated on the vocal aspiration (there is only one :) of affluent females --formally educated or not. One might trust, for example, a ubiquitous assertion that women entered the labor market in the 1970s ... after a relatively long vacation from some sort of 3-year corvée event to support The Allied War Effort. That would be a mistake though.

Countless hundreds of thousands of females here, too, "have traditionally been accustomed to working" in fields, kitchens, laundries, mills (factories), and domestic "engineering". For centuries. For a pittance or none. Therefore my attitude to the fiasco so-called feminist revolution --"leaning into" leisure, consciousness, living wages, sex discrimination, paid leave that never materializes-- violently alternates between irritation and resignation. For whom, Qui bono?, prosperity benefits is a question that has yet to be answered by the will of the people.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Sat Dec 2nd, 2017 at 05:35:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
the brothels

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Sat Dec 2nd, 2017 at 05:39:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, but feminism had to start with the middle classes. And so naturally the inital statements of intent will reflect the concerns and issues that affect white middle class women.

But feminism is in a state of evolution, indeed feminism has to be about societal and theoretical evolution, else it fails. MeToo and BLM are both coming together to provide a new burst of progress in ideas. But, feminism is like any other form of politics, it's done by those who show up. If you don't like what they do, show them there are other ways

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Dec 3rd, 2017 at 12:41:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
99% of all women work, now and in the past, actually getting fair remuneration for that work is the novelty.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Dec 3rd, 2017 at 12:34:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
When an emancipation influx of women into the workforce depresses the job market so much that the modern-income family has it harder than a single-income family in the 1950s, how important is fair enumeration? It is arguable that a wife and kids had it easier when the husband was in charge of their welfare rather than the society and the market.

Elisabeth Warren alludes to that in her famous presentation "The Coming Collapse of the Middle Class" of March 8, 2007 (Youtube), particularly around 23:20-24:40, 26:40-27:20, 28:04-30:08 time marks.

See also this Guardian article:

How feminism became capitalism's handmaiden - and how to reclaim it

by das monde on Mon Dec 4th, 2017 at 02:44:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah, the good old days. <wipes away a nostalgic tear>

When men were men, women were women, martial rape hadn't been invented and a stick no thicker than your thumb was the key to marital bliss. Good times.

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Mon Dec 4th, 2017 at 10:39:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Those were the best times ever, anywhere by then. It got still better, but the current progress is very debatable. Two decades after "It's economy, stupid!", a pedestal for (mostly) well established women is more or less a consolation for the progressives, is it not?
by das monde on Mon Dec 4th, 2017 at 03:07:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well sure, if you were a white guy. I mean, fuck the rest of the human race, right?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Mon Dec 4th, 2017 at 05:11:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And not even then, honestly. Except maybe in a few bits of the US.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Mon Dec 4th, 2017 at 05:15:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, but at least there wasn't an internet. We could get our fake news directly from ABC and that was that. Much simpler.
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Mon Dec 4th, 2017 at 05:18:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You mean, the pedestal was ready sooner in the USSR, and blacks were better off in Africa? What does you grandma say?

White is over, if you want it. Enjoy!

by das monde on Tue Dec 5th, 2017 at 12:56:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I believe you got that one backwards. Wages weren't depressed because of women entering the workplace, wages were depressed because automation robbed the workforce of the power of organisation. An atomised workforce is easy to control and threaten, poverty wages are the result.

Coincidence is not causation

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Dec 4th, 2017 at 11:12:36 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Wages started to stagnate (and labour unions got hit) in the 1980s, quite before tangible automatization and outsourcing.

There were several factors, surely. But rough long-term doubling of the labour force ought to have comparable causal influence as CO2 increase in the atmosphere.

by das monde on Mon Dec 4th, 2017 at 03:04:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Because of course women started working in 1980.

1980. Remind me, what kind of crazy economic ideology took hold around then? With destruction of unions, deregulation, privatisation at firesale price?

Sleep deprived as I am with the recent birth, I cannot seem to find the name just yet.

Earth provides enough to satisfy every man's need, but not every man's greed. Gandhi

by Cyrille (cyrillev domain yahoo.fr) on Mon Dec 4th, 2017 at 06:37:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
So it is not automation.

The wage stagnation trend continued after Reagan and Thatcher regardless ideology... or variably "progressive" leaders. With new wild market rules in force, the doubly inflated labour mass had no power whatsoever.

Birth congrats!

by das monde on Tue Dec 5th, 2017 at 12:50:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Reagan and Thatcher ideology never abated -thus far.

Corbyn may yet attempt to claw things back, but he is not in power yet.

Earth provides enough to satisfy every man's need, but not every man's greed. Gandhi

by Cyrille (cyrillev domain yahoo.fr) on Tue Dec 5th, 2017 at 09:16:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]

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