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(caption: The roughly 3000-year old skeletons found in the Philistine graveyard in Ashkelon have clear hallmarks of Aegean customs, not Canaanite.)
Is the Bible a true story? Eighteen years ago, on October 29, 1999, Haaretz published an article by Tel Aviv University's Ze'ev Herzog, whose message was spelled out in the very headline: "The Bible: No evidence on the ground."[...] The unbridgeable gap Herzog described between the Biblical tales and the archaeological findings was nothing new, to researchers. Israeli archaeologists have long thought as much, based on biblical criticism theories originating in Germany during the early 19th century. The general public, however, was shocked.[...] In any case, most archaeologists now agree that the Israelite-Jewish identity arose from traditions that developed among the inhabitants of Canaan. It was not brought from outside by invaders.

Jury is still out on the six olive pits.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Thu Nov 9th, 2017 at 09:16:04 PM EST
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I have heard that the archaeological community has seen signs that the Philistine peoples, specifically (distinct from other Cannanites) were either a settler Mycenean Greek state or strongly influenced by them. Greek raiding and pirate activites were pretty common in the Mediterranean of the time, and it does not seem impossible on its face.
by Zwackus on Fri Nov 10th, 2017 at 12:54:52 AM EST
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Yes, Helen and I had a wack at the topic in this thread. 2nd millennium trade flow has become quite the controversy upsetting classicists. Greek-speaking people weren't the only "pirates" settling/colonizing/destroying ports along the Mediterranean, Black, and Baltic seas.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Fri Nov 10th, 2017 at 01:45:29 AM EST
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