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I would be much less charitable in describing a roomful of Boris Johnsons: Why boarding schools produce bad leaders (The Guardian, 9 June 2014)
The elite tradition is to send children away at a young age to be educated. But future politicians who suffer this 'privileged abandonment' often turn out as bullies or bumblers. A psychotherapist explains why


A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Feb 3rd, 2018 at 10:49:17 AM EST
The article you quote is actually quite charitable to the "survivors" of early age boarding schools describing how they develop a defensive wall and survival strategies based on over-confidence, bullying, keeping your head down, becoming a charming bumbler, or keeping an incongruently unruffled smile in place - avoiding appearing insecure, unhappy, childish or foolish - and projecting those emotions onto others. In short, you have to become duplicitous to survive, and hiding your feelings makes it very difficult to develop mature relationships or emotional intelligence in later life.

However being charitable to the survivors and tolerating the continuance of the system are two different things, and it is remarkable the degree the system continues to dominate English public and private life, with two thirds of the Cabinet and much of the civil service, army, and industry still "led" by the emotionally damaged.

I have long argued that anti-Europeanism, besides being a natural consequence of national chauvinism, is also required to maintain the English class system intact, as it provides an external bogeyman to blame for all ills more accurately ascribed to the class bullies who actually run the UK show. Perhaps, in that sense, EU membership provided a crutch for the UK status quo, which can only be overturned by leaving. Perhaps Corbyn has a point after all...

Index of Frank's Diaries

by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Sat Feb 3rd, 2018 at 11:56:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
attachment theory

which may or may not exculpate the attachment of certain people to imperial ideologies and violent subjugation of diverse peoples.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Sat Feb 3rd, 2018 at 08:52:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The system continues because it successfully reproduces itself - much like the US equivalent, which turns out frat boys and sports jocks (aka "leaders" and "coaches") with similar emotional handicaps.

Insiders of all generations feel no need to rebel against it. And why should they, when it serves them so well, and they are demonstrably better and more talented than the lower orders? [1]

Outsiders underestimate its power and influence, and overestimate the power of democracy to steer it.

In fact there is no option to vote it out and replace it, or even to mitigate its poisonous effects.

The only development that might destroy it is wholesale collapse and revolution, probably after a nasty fascist interlude - which is looking increasingly likely as the Brexit iceberg looms closer.

[1] Not everyone comes out a bumbler. In the less elevated schools, which are reserved for middle class overachievers, parents can turn their offspring into hyper-effective near-geniuses who not only run marathons, ride horses, sail, ski, and and play musical instruments to a professional level, but also have the work ethic needed to survive the gruelling training demanded by a career in law, medicine, or the more menial middle managerial levels of banking, accountancy, and management consultancy. The more elevated schools provide all of these benefits - and more - by teaching charm, self-regard, imperious bluster, class signalling, and unrestrained feral greed as substitutes for inferior practical abilities.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Sun Feb 4th, 2018 at 02:53:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Lately I've come to the conclusion that the biggest fail of European history was Napolean's braindead idea to march all the way to Moscow instead of putting his dudes on row boats and then casually strolling up to Buckingham palace and setting fire to it.
by generic on Sun Feb 4th, 2018 at 10:03:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Napoleon had plans to invade Britain, the problem was just all those boats in the canal. He tried to assemble enough ships to make it across, though the British tried to stop him. Trafalgar was one of those places were the two agendas met, and there it was to a large extent settled thanks to the leadership of one Horatio Nelson. I can't find if the schools young Nelson attended were boarding schools, but then again he joined the navy at a young age and probably got all the opportunity for pseudo-adult personality development there.

The invasion of Russia was one in a series of attempts to weaken Britain. In the case of Russia, they were breaking the rules of the Continental System - the attempt to break Britain by starving them of money - so if Russia could be brought into the fold, maybe Britain would yield. As we all know, it didn't work, but that was the theory. Maybe if Napoleon had starved Britain of food instead, things might have worked out differently.

by fjallstrom on Sun Feb 4th, 2018 at 07:22:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
[1]: The non-bumblers do not look like leaders, do they?

Which nice schools produce actual leaders?

by das monde on Sun Feb 4th, 2018 at 01:17:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Which nice schools produce actual leaders?

Er, none perhaps?

That's why we're in this mess.

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sun Feb 4th, 2018 at 09:23:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The more elevated schools provide all of these benefits - and more - by teaching charm, self-regard, imperious bluster, class signalling, and unrestrained feral greed as substitutes for inferior practical abilities.

Don't forget superciliousness, diffidence, sarcasm, entitledness, and buggery (the old school tie-that-binds in blackmail's bondage).
Then there are the Bullington-type rituals, unmentionable.

'Here a curtain of propriety descends upon the scene.' Mark Twain  

Privilege factories... Institutionalised sadism.
 

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sun Feb 4th, 2018 at 09:19:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Wiki
He also attempted to amend the Daylight Saving Bill to give the county of Somerset its own time zone, fifteen minutes behind London.[51]

In a debate on London Local Authorities Bill on 7 December 2011, he said that council officials who have the power to issue on-the-spot fines should be made to wear bowler hats

Perhaps he meant that the Somerset time zone should be moved 150 years behind London...

Index of Frank's Diaries

by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Sat Feb 3rd, 2018 at 10:54:31 AM EST


She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Sat Feb 3rd, 2018 at 05:23:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
that would be to return it to the time zone it occupied before the arrival of the railways.

Bristol is 11 minutes behind london time and the clock on Bristol cathedral has a separate hand showing local time.

So, instead of being 150 years behind the times, Mr Cheese-Logg is 178 years behind

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Feb 5th, 2018 at 10:10:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Britain's imperial fantasies have given us Brexit - Guardian - Opinion - Gary Younge
For while the Brexit vote was certainly underpinned by a melancholic longing for a glorious past, the era it sought to relive was less the second world war than the longer, less distinguished or openly celebrated period of empire. For if memories of the war made some feel more defiant, recollections of empire made them deluded. Our colonial past, and the inability to come to terms with its demise, gave many the impression that we are far bigger, stronger and more influential than we really are. At some point they convinced themselves that the reason we are at the centre of most world maps is because the Earth revolves around us, not because it was us who drew the maps.
But if echoes of empire reverberated through the campaign, they have also framed our negotiating strategy. The past 18 months have illustrated the journey from hubris to humiliation. For a couple of generations, we have seen our attributes and others' weaknesses through the wrong side of a magnifying glass; now our diminished state is becoming fully apparent, and, like Boris Johnson, the foreign secretary, reciting Kipling in Myanmar, we are struggling to adjust.
by Bernard on Sat Feb 3rd, 2018 at 01:46:50 PM EST
Resentful in Redcar: `We made the finest steel in the world - now we make lattes'  - Guardian
Like many communities in England's north-east, the people of this North Yorkshire town, which bears the scars of industrial decline, and has a youth unemployment rate more than double the national average, made their unhappiness known in June 2016. They fought back. In Redcar, there was a hefty 66% vote for Brexit, similar to that in areas further north up the coast, from Teesside to Tyneside.

"We have to get our country back to where it needs to be," says Geoff Holding, a caretaker at a government office in the town who voted Leave and whose brother lost his job at the steelworks.

He wants an end to cheap imports of foreign goods, like the Chinese steel that did for the local plant. There is a still a thriving chemicals sector in Redcar, but not enough manufacturing. "We need to bring things back in-house, get industry back on its own feet, make things ourselves."

Debate may still be raging in London about soft and hard Brexits as Remainers call for a second referendum, but in Redcar it is a done deal. Here the Leave mantra about "taking back control" is to be taken pretty much literally.

by Bernard on Sun Feb 4th, 2018 at 10:10:42 AM EST
When I read the "He wants an end to cheap imports of foreign goods, like the Chinese steel that did for the local plant." sentence, my first reaction was: good thing that the Brexiters don't want any free trade agreements...
by Bernard on Sun Feb 4th, 2018 at 02:52:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
They don't want free trade that cuts both ways, they want a return to empire where the benefits all flow one way...

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Sun Feb 4th, 2018 at 04:01:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And the only kind of free trade deal China would ever offer is one where all the benefits flow to China.
by Gag Halfrunt on Tue Feb 6th, 2018 at 01:00:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I've never quite understood why Brexiteers think the UK (with zero experience and expertise) could negotiate better FTA's than the EU with a much bigger market and negotiating leverage. I've never heard them complain in specific detail about the many FTA's the EU already has negotiated or is in the process of negotiating, which together cover just about all their major trading partners.

I suppose the UK could negotiate FTA's more focused on it's own strengths in service industries, but I don't see why the EU could not do so just as well on the UK's behalf. The UK also sees potential in importing cheaper food from developing countries as it appears to have no interest in supporting its own food industry. But defaulting to WTO tariffs won't achieve that as they are highest for food products.  With the CAP moving from supporting production to supporting farm incomes directly, the EU may move slowly in that direction in any case.

I suspect the Brexiteers entertain fantasies of resuming master/servant relationships with former colonies - in which case I expect they are in for a rude shock. Ireland is showing no enthusiasm for resuming such a relationship despite being the hardest hit by Brexit.

Index of Frank's Diaries

by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Tue Feb 6th, 2018 at 01:36:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
They don't think.

I suspect the Brexiteers entertain fantasies of resuming master/servant relationships with former colonies - in which case I expect they are in for a rude shock. Ireland is showing no enthusiasm for resuming such a relationship despite being the hardest hit by Brexit.

The Brexiteers think the EU and the UK are peers. They think the US and UK are peers. They are deluded.

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Tue Feb 6th, 2018 at 03:06:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh don't worry.  The US isn't finished debasing itself by a long mark.  It will slide down to the UK yet and maybe keep on going.
by rifek on Wed Feb 7th, 2018 at 03:34:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Global free trade Brexiteers seem to ignore all the EU's FTAs or genuinely not know about them.

During the referendum campaign, Brexiteers made much of the fact that the EU does not have an FTA with India, even though one is under negotiation.

There were anecdotes about African diplomats meeting Brexiteers who talked about post-Brexit trade deals between the UK and their countries but had never heard of the Cotonou Agreement.

by Gag Halfrunt on Wed Feb 7th, 2018 at 03:23:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
As Michael Gove might say, "who needs experts" in trade negotiation anyway...

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Wed Feb 7th, 2018 at 03:40:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Free Trade isn't about goods, cos these people all made their money is financial double dealing and tax avoidance. They don't make things, that's for lower class people in trade. they have no intrest in exports or shipping or the grubby interchange of artefacts.

They are the people who, in Alan Clark's phrase, look down on people who buy their own furniture instead of inheriting it. Who do not consider themselves rich unless they can live on the interest of the interest of their estate.

To them, Free Trade is about low regulation, about low or, preferably, no taxation. About managing other people's money and hiding their ill-gotten gains from national authorities.

It's not about how different societies exchange items for mutual benefit, it's about control and power. And money is power so they seek to control money. That is Free Trade, where they are Free and others are subject to their control.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Feb 6th, 2018 at 03:21:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
From an analysis by Dan Roberts in today's Guardian that I can't find on the website:
The only way to argue against such analysis [about the effects of leaving the Customs Union] is to adopt the position taken by extreme free-traders such as Jacob Rees-Mogg. In this vision, Britain not only seeks to lower the few remaining trade barriers for manufactured goods but also throw open its doors to all comers in agriculture and commodities too. Do not worry about the Chinese dumping subsidised steel or the Brazilians flooding our supermarkets with bargain-basement food, they say. The benefits of lower costs for consumers will compensate for any collapse in British farming or steel.

It would be a Brexit that would decimate the parts of Britain that voted for it, but it is the only one that makes sense for those who want to take back control.

Hard Brexit and China deal would wipe out Welsh steel industry, first minister claims | The Guardian | 02/02/2018

Carwyn Jones has warned that the Welsh steel industry would be "wiped out" if Britain left the European single market and signed a free trade agreement with China, and claimed a fresh deal with New Zealand including agriculture could badly hit its farmers.

The first minister of Wales made the comments as his government launched a trade paper claiming that hard Brexit would have a severe, negative impact on the country's economy.

The report, which is supported by an economic impact analysis from Cardiff Business School, claims that crashing out of the EU on to World Trade Organization rules would cause the Welsh economy to shrink by between 8 and 10%, equivalent to £1,500-£2,000 per person in Wales.

by Gag Halfrunt on Mon Feb 5th, 2018 at 08:15:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Brexit and the Hundred Years War...
At the Tory party conference last October, Jacob Rees-Mogg issued a rallying cry that linked Brexit to the great triumphs of English arms on continental Europe: "We need to be reiterating the benefits of Brexit!" he cried. "Oh, this is so important in the history of our country... It's Waterloo! It's Crécy! It's Agincourt! We win all these things!"

---

They stormed towns, raping and killing at will. They enslaved men and women. They held anyone they thought had money for ransom and tortured them until their families paid up. They stole everything that could be moved and destroyed most of what could not. When they had stripped an area of everything, they moved on to the next set of victims - all in the name of the English "king of France".

---

The English claim to the throne of France and the grand rhetoric of Brexit's revival of the glorious Englishness of Agincourt are bold and thrilling as well as being bonkers - they stir the blood even while they numb the brain. The other is that these grand gestures are far easier to make than to unmake.

It is astonishing how much pain people will suffer and inflict rather than admit they made a mistake. Brexit is not the Hundred Years War, but unless someone finds a way out it now, the consequences will be felt for a century.



Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Sun Feb 4th, 2018 at 04:15:22 PM EST
I'm getting increasingly worried at a ratcheting of the violent rhetoric when Brexit inevitably fails to deliver the riches promised. The EU has been portrayed as the villain for decades and now is refusing a "good Brexit deal" (They want to punish us!)

Coupled with a drift to authoritarian right-wing policies, it is sadly not hard to envision an isolated post-Brexit Britain becoming increasingly aggressive vis a vis its European neighbors. After all, what's best to stoke the flame of patriotism (the last refuge of the scoundrels)?

Britain has one of the most powerful militaries in Europe, along with France, and goodness forbids should anything happen, like Spain's Rajoy government trying something rash on Gibraltar...

After Dunkirk last July, Darkest Hour last month, what's the next movie to revive the good old days? Trafalgar?

by Bernard on Sun Feb 4th, 2018 at 06:51:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Afghanistan 1842?
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Sun Feb 4th, 2018 at 07:00:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
As Gary Younge points out, the most recent analogy for brexit is the Suez debacle from the 50s, where Imperial fantasies hit the rocks of reailty. The UK (and France) were humiliated, a fate which awaits us in the near future.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Feb 5th, 2018 at 10:15:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's been mentioned here before.
Public Pride in Imperialism and Colonialism (Jan 2016) Perhaps the mood has changed post-Referendum? Opinion leaders are adapting.

Are there similar opinion polls for France, Spain, Portugal, and Germany? Dread Russia?

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Sun Feb 4th, 2018 at 10:33:29 PM EST
Are there similar opinion polls for France, Spain, Portugal, the Netherlands, and Germany? Dread Russia?
(euro-centric)

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Mon Feb 5th, 2018 at 01:41:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Are there similar opinion polls for France, Spain, Portugal, the Netherlands, Italy, Greece, and Germany? Dread Russia?
(euro-centric)

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Mon Feb 5th, 2018 at 01:43:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I've been asking myself the very same question upon reading this piece :)

Regarding France, there was this poll two years ago, when then not-candidate Emmanuel Macron called colonization "a crime against humanity". About 52% of French people agreed that "France should present official apologies for murders and exactions committed during the colonization."
51% agreed with Macron, that "colonization is a crime against humanity." There are interesting splits based on age and gender (60% women over 40% men on "crime against humanity.", for instance) and by political affiliation.
Complete results here.

by Bernard on Mon Feb 5th, 2018 at 09:01:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Belgium? Or was that just the King, while the Belgians had nothing to do with it?
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Mon Feb 5th, 2018 at 06:46:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Plus Portugal and Italy. This would pretty much round up the list of European countries who have had any significant colonial empire on other continents.

One could go on with Americans opinion about the Philippines colonization.

by Bernard on Mon Feb 5th, 2018 at 08:50:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Plus Puerto Rico and de facto control of Cuba until Castro.


"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Feb 6th, 2018 at 05:11:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Changing narrative ...

Enemies and Passing Friends  
Settler Ideologies in Twentieth Century Ulster

The term 'imperialism', which was coined in 1858 to mean 'despotism', changed in 1881 to take on the meaning 'principle or spirit of empire; advocacy of imperial interests' in 1881 (Shorter Oxford English Dictionary 1959). To this could be added Lord Rosebery's definition, 'greater pride in Empire' (Eldridge 1978:3). It is probably misleading to apply the term indiscriminately to the whole of the four hundred or so years of modern European expansionism. This ranged from the plunder empires of the sixteenth through the settlement colonies of the seventeenth and eighteenth to the tropical empires of the nineteenth century. The 'spirit of empire' of the latter, with its certainty, conceit and confidence, was very different form the critical self-evaluation and humbling cultural comparison of the previous two centuries when confronted with much older civilisations such as India, and from the self-doubt of the twentieth century (Faber 1966:45; Betts 1976:150).  

The form of empire also changed. By the eighteenth century both British and French empires had evolved into a system based on the political ascendancy of the metropolis with its dependent white settler colonies, first in North America and later in Australia and New Zealand. These existed for the economic well-being of the 'mother country', and consisted of a large settler population and a small 'native' population, considered unimportant especially when nomadic and marginalised by extermination or by herding on to reserves.

British Empire: Students should be taught colonialism 'not all good', say historians | The Independent - Jan. 2016 |

Global Warming - distance between America and Europe is steadily increasing.

by Oui on Mon Feb 5th, 2018 at 09:19:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Mail: Brexit Dream Team
Coup plot to install Brexit 'dream team' and oust May: Boris as PM, Gove to become his deputy and Chancellor Rees-Mogg if she insists on staying in EU customs union, warn rebel MPs

  •   Takeover would see Boris in No 10, Gove as deputy and Rees-Mogg chancellor
  •   Brexit 'war cabinet' meet Wednesday and Thursday to agree negotiating stance
  •   Major row over whether UK should stay in a customs union expected at meeting
  •   Mr Johnson vowed the 'cavalry is coming' to block staying in a customs union


Gove and the Cavalry...

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Mon Feb 5th, 2018 at 10:52:31 AM EST
The Mail and the Times have evidently been getting high on their own supply of bullshit. There simply isn't the support in Westminster for these clowns to take over on a clean slate and push their delusions through.

May is the compromise candidate, a quiet remainer who is now a commited brexiteer. She is probably the only reason the opposing factions in the Tory party aren't involved in armed conflict. Any time anybody talks about a challenge,, the name of a credible challenger eludes them. All the "big" beasts who are presumed to be jostling to be Prime Minister are too identified with one faction or the other, which means they are unacceptable for the other side.

If this lot were strong armed in, the party would actually split wide open. There is a chasm running through the Tory party and May is currently the only bridge between the two sides.

It's not just brexit that divides them either : The lunatic free traders who want the UK to become a low wage, low regulation offshore tax bank are the brexit ultras. The remainers and soft brexiteers are those who are more grounded in the UK remaining a civilised country. Frankly, I don't think the two halves even make sense as a single group anymore.  

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Feb 5th, 2018 at 10:35:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Independent - Matthew Norman - Beneath the mask, Jacob Rees-Mogg is a dangerous and deceitful bully on secondment from the 18th century

Was there ever a more exquisitely polite thug than Jacob Rees-Mogg?

On indefinite secondment from the mid-18th century, the Honourable Member for the East India Company has finally offered a flash of the real Moggy behind the mask. Hidden until now beneath the Savile Row three-piece and floridly courteous facade lies a deceitful bully with a taste for attacking those more honest than himself.

In the week the early Trump supporter's role model granted Republican sycophants day release from his colon to smear the FBI, Moggy took a gigantic leaf from the President's most malevolent playbook.



keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Feb 5th, 2018 at 10:18:35 PM EST
All that is solid - The Brexit Dream Team Delusion

The Times is probably the most famous newspaper in the world and is regarded by the establishment as their paper of record. How sad it is then to see this pillar of the press become the politics equivalent of Hello magazine. Today's front page, "Brexiteers plot to installs 'dream team' at No 10", is gossipy copy typical of Tim Shipman. Theresa May is facing a coup "Tory MPs claim". A cabinet Brexiteer has "told MPs" Liam Fox will resign if a customs union with the EU is signed (might that cabinet member be the disgraced serving minister himself?) Also, "MPs called for" someone to keep an eye on our negotiating team in Brussels lest they flush away Brexit's gilded turd. And lastly a "leading Eurosceptic" says the Brexiteers will take over if the customs union plan goes ahead. Meanwhile, friends of May say the PM is planning an away day to finalise the government's negotiating position - which is a bit of a worry considering we're almost half way to leaving the EU. But here she is very definitely going to put her foot fown and tell recalcitrant ministers to shape up or ship out.

While I have no doubt we're being related stuff whispered to "Shippers" over the course of last week, the layout of this government-in-waiting is more fantasy football than a serious forecast of what's going to happen. Consider, Boris Johnson is set to be Prime Minister with Michael Gove as the deputy and Jacob Rees-Mogg in the Treasury. Senior positions are also planned for the permanently puddled Dominic Raab and the determinedly duplicitous Priti Patel.

Allow me pour creosote into the coffee.



keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Feb 5th, 2018 at 10:22:11 PM EST
Not to worry, May has just abandoned all thought of remaining in a customs Union. Next!!!  What else do the Brexiteers want? Ah yes. A no deal Brexit!  That should be really difficult to negotiate...

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Mon Feb 5th, 2018 at 10:36:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And this, boys and girls, is why you shouldn't put spoiled brats in charge of your country.


She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Tue Feb 6th, 2018 at 05:36:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
and with the customs union abandoned, the recent agreement on the Irish border gets flushed down the toilet.

So, which is it to be? Are we to be a nation that obeys international law or one that believes we are above such things?

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Feb 6th, 2018 at 05:43:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Wed Feb 7th, 2018 at 06:30:37 PM EST
yes, but the senior brexiteers are gonna make out like bandits, so no deal brexit with extra idiocy.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Feb 7th, 2018 at 07:35:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And they'll blame Brussels for refusing to offer a "reasonable" trade deal.
by Gag Halfrunt on Thu Feb 8th, 2018 at 10:58:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
If I was an EU negotiator, I wouldn't be offering any concessions at this stage. It seems clear that whatever deal the EU offers will be rejected first time around with lots of recriminations and then there will be last minute "Crisis" negotiations where the real deal will be hammered out. Even that deal may be rejected by Parliament as many Brexiteers seem to prefer the 'no deal' option. In that case there may be no deal at all, or the EU will be negotiating with a different government.  Either way, there is no point in "investing" political capital in May at this stage. She can't deliver on whatever deal the EU might give her at this stage...

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Thu Feb 8th, 2018 at 01:38:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The U.K. gov are not credible negotiating partners.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Feb 8th, 2018 at 09:56:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Am I the only one who gets a midge nervous when a projection of a hard exits shows a 3,5% gain for London? Is that London as capital - or just the City?
by Bjinse on Thu Feb 8th, 2018 at 02:01:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think it was a mistake. Newsnight showed a similar chart last night and it said -3.5 rather than +3.5

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Thu Feb 8th, 2018 at 09:56:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That seems much more plausible.
by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Fri Feb 9th, 2018 at 07:41:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
happen when gov's resort to the Christopher Steele method of investigation and public relations.
Brexit impact studies leak reveals

Watch this space (ascending order of releases)
Department for Exiting the European Union

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Fri Feb 9th, 2018 at 04:47:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
According to the BBC the figures read:

The research suggests London - which backed Remain - would fare the best, with reductions of 1%, 2% and 2.5% in each of the three scenarios.

by Bjinse on Fri Feb 9th, 2018 at 10:17:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I should think it's a reflection of a major increase in the number of civil servants/advisors/contractors required to staff all the agencies they will need to create or beef up to duplicate the EU ones (unless they are serious about having no regulations and just letting shit happen)
also the administration of all the programs where  the EU dealt directly with the UK's regions.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Fri Feb 9th, 2018 at 09:56:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]

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