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Blood & Treasure

Unless we've been taking happy pills and are assuming that the investigation will be conducted competently and will go wherever the evidence takes it, then politically, the interesting thing here isn't who killed Nemtsov, but who is going to get blamed (and probably, though not necessarily, framed) for it.

It may, for instance, be the right time to rein in people like Streltsov and the ultra-nationalists who have been getting a bit over-inflamed  - a bit too prone to independent action - since the whole Ukraine thing kicked off. This would have the advantage that nationalist crazies are indeed likely suspects and so the drive to let them know who's boss would be bolstered by a more or less legitimate investigation. Of course, this raises the issue of whether Moscow can, in fact, get the crazies to wind their necks in.

Early doors, the regime has floated the idea that Muslim terrorists might be responsible, implying that  - because Nemtsov was Jewish - his murder  was an anti-semitic attack similar to that perpetrated after the Charlie Hebdo murders. This has the advantage of tying  into one Russian propaganda line - 'why the hostility, we're all facing the same threats?' - while satisfying the Russian overclass penchant for brutal mockery. When it comes to offensive humour, Charlie H has nothing on those guys.



by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on
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In story: 2-3 March 2015

Ban the ones burning musical instruments
( / )
Blood & Treasure

On that note, Beijing has also taken its campaign against Islamic radicalism in Xinjiang in a truly bizarre direction:

But there are particular reasons why the Chinese Communist Party might be interested in promoting public dancing in Xinjiang now. Beijing is nervous about what it considers signs of religious extremism among Uyghurs, and one of these telltale signs is a disinclination to dance. In speech at the National People's Congress in March last year, a Xinjiang representative and deputy chairperson of the China Dancer's Association Dilnar Abdulla gave a speech claiming that religious extremists in Xinjiang were `campaigning for the commoners not to sing and dance, even not permitting them to sing and dance at weddings.'

So, according to this logic, orchestrating a campaign to encourage people to dance is actually a way to get people to disavow publicly any sympathy for religious extremism. People are technically not coerced into dancing, despite what the Turkish headlines scream, but it would be a brave individual who would call attention to themselves as a potential extremist by refusing the invitation to `cut a rug'. Public and peer pressure is enough for most people to join in.

Yes, Beijing is quite literally compelling Uighurs to dance in public to demonstrate that they are moderate Muslims. 



by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on
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In story: 2-3 March 2015

Re: Living Off The Planet
( / )
Beppe Grillo's Blog

«Twenty years ago, I was a good hunter and I often went hunting. I had two dogs, a German Shorthaired Pointer and a setter, and from dawn to dusk we went up and down the gullies so by the end of the day, the dogs were tired out. On returning back to the home of the local people, the first thing we did was to feed the dogs. And we gave them a massive bowl of soup that was perhaps enough for five. On one occasion, I saw a small scraggy, starving, weak cat approaching. It was really frightened and it crept closer very slowly. He looked at the dogs, miaowed meekly and placed a paw on the edge of the bowl. With a single swipe of its paw, the pointer sent the cat to his death with a broken spine. This episode made a big impression on me. So - the thing is - we were that little cat.».
Enrico Mattei told this story on 23 March 1961. But the passivity with which Italy has suffered the crises of Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya and Ukraine makes the little story very much one of the moment.

Oil and foreign policy
Oil is still pulling all the strings of an interventionist foreign policy that more than in any period in history, is setting up the world for a scenario that is potentially dramatic.
Just to cite one example, Libya gives us the latest demonstration of how an armed intervention (2011) in an arab/islamic country can further worsen the situation on the ground and has solely one objective: to strengthen the financial and energy agendas of western multinationals.

...

Italy is the "little cat" that Mattei talked about
The situation with Libya demonstrates that we are once more becoming that "little cat" that Mattei talked about. And without have an alternative plan we are at risk of finding ourselves with a our bones broken - having been batted away by the French Shorthaired Pointer - ooops - no - by the German Shorthaired Pointer.
Under the leadership of Enrico Mattei, the national oil company, ENI, negotiated significant oil concessions in the Middle East and an important commercial agreement with the Soviet Union - initiatives that contributed to breaking the oligopoly of the `Seven Sisters', that then (as now?) dominated the world oil industry. Furthermore, Mattei brought in the principle of giving 75% of the profits from exploiting the reserves to the countries owning them. A compensation principle in relation to the people subjected to the plunder of their resources that today we can just dream about.

The courage to be Italian
If we want to ensure that sovereign states are not destroyed by the multinational oil companies of the west we have to redefine our scope and give value to our geographic position and our collective intelligence. Is it possible that we can have a role that is not subordinate to the great powers? Sure. Is it possible for us to have widespread experimentation with alternative energy sources and thus escape from the dictates of the oil god? Sure. We just need to have the political brilliance and the courage of Enrico Mattei. The courage to be Italian." Carlo Sibilia and the M5S Foreign Affairs committee



by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on
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In story: 2-3 March 2015

Re: Economy and Finance
( / )
Beppe Grillo's Blog
M5S EUROPE'S PROPOSAL
To avoid new crises occurring in the future, the 5 Star MoVement's proposal (put forward in amendments that have been presented) is to bring in a modern Glass-Steagall Act in this way:
- strict and obligatory separation between the traditional credit activity and the activity of speculation and investment.
- prohibition on banks having part-ownership of non-financial companies, thus avoiding dangerous conflicts of interest.
- permanent disqualification of any manager that violates the regulations.
- exemption from the regulations for the small banks that operate below certain thresholds in terms of the value of speculative activity in financial statements.
We need to return to the model of Roosevelt's Glass-Steagall Act: on one side the traditional banks only carrying out activities supporting the real economy (collection of savings and providing loans to small and medium sized businesses) that enjoy state guarantees, and on the other side, the investment banks that continue their speculative activities without public guarantees, and thus they are free to go bust without being saved with money from the tax payers.
Banking separation is above all, a reform of fiscal policy. Austerity came into being because the countries have to save the billions of Euro needed to save the banks. To prevent the return of crises like that, is the necessary pre-condition to construct those political actions that everyone is waiting for: tax cuts and the introduction of a citizen's income." M5S Europe

What say Varoufakis? Is this Syriza's position too?

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on
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In story: Open Thread of the Week

Re: No, Charlie Hebdo is not obsessed by Islam
( / )
That the particular mother of the insult is not being promoted as justification or rallying symbol for crazy policies.

Pissing on someone's mother's grave is uncouth and uncalled for. Unless that person is Thatcher's son. Same principle applies to religions and their founders.

- Jake

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on
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In story: 2-3 March 2015

Re: Je suis Boris
( / )
Boris was no threat with only 2% of the electorate, but scuttlebutt has it he was going to release some information with dire consequence (for whom one wonders, if even true).

More tinfoil please...

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on
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In story: 2-3 March 2015

Re: Je suis Boris
( / )
If the investigation is a farce, does it matter what is declared? Letting a probable perpetrator (not necessarily Russia) to be instrumental in a significant investigation is not unique in the last 6 months.

Putin's supposed motivation looks weak though. How could Nemtsov be more painful alive than murdered? Doesn't Putin have enough headache in 2015 already? Would the opposition have such a consolidation opportunity without this event? Doing it next to Kremlin is not consistent with a cold political calculation (or professionally "smooth" execution). But yeah, how would we know?

by das monde on
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Sure, that absolutely is the way to use a local insurgency, as Putin is also demonstrating in Ukraine right now.

But bragging about your martial prowess when everyone else did all the real fighting that won the war for your side is just pathetic. It would be like Iran crowing about how great the Revolutionary Guard is for winning the Iraq war.

- Jake

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on
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In story: Open Thread of the Week

Re: No, Charlie Hebdo is not obsessed by Islam
( / )
eurogreen:
Calling someone a nigger or calling your neighbour's mother a whore are examples of seeking to insult  a particular person.

Yes, through aspersions to the group who is lending identity to the individual.

I happen to side with both of you on this, and probably disagree with both on other issues perhaps.

In the sense that I think satire a very valuable corrector of smug certainties certain people have adopted as gospel, a category that includes many, many people from all walks of life.

Now comes the hard part... We in europe have chosen laicete, imo justly, as group identity because we value laughter above hypocrisy. We have also chosen to allow millions of immigrants to come live here and practice their freedom of religion, perhaps never considering that chucking a huge swath of poor immigrants down in the unsupervisable peripheries of latge cities to fend for themselves might lead to cultural clashes hard to control. Not hard to predict, just very hard to control.

France is famously welcoming and generous to legal immigrants, many of whom live happily and harmoniously next to neighbours ranging from other faiths to atheists, as Moslems have been able to do for centuries in many lands.

The problem is the illegal immigrants funnelling through Italy and spreading out all over the rest of Europe, some to good ends doing work Europeans would rather not do, like pick tomatoes in the 40C sun for E20 a day off the books.

Some -not most- make it out of wageslave poverty and thinking back on the helloholes many of them escaped from, it is indeed an upgrade from their former lives.

But pretty soon they see how the game is rigged against even poor Europeans, and judge for themselves how their fate is even worse, as they adjust to seeing Europe through the eyes of someone who lives -as best he can- here, rather than some naive dreamer who thought the streets were paved with gold here, (and they are compared with places they're escaping from where the streets are paved with blood.

The problem is in the numbers. If Muslims were in small enough groups to assimilate more easily, and if Europe weren't already on its knees from the bankster bullies, then we could do a good job of blendong them in and eventually after a couple of generations they would learn to appreciate more of our sens of humour, learn to play with irony and satire for themselves and come to realise it serves as a valuable tool against hypocrisy and safety valve for the oppressed, (like Charlie Hebdo cartoonists who feel repressed by the antics of our homegrown religions and other institutions who need to be kept reminded they have feet of clay like the rest of us.

Islam is not a particular problem per se, but strictly - or even semi-strictly- observed and practiced, it is not the happy cultural marriage it has been in the past sometimes with us Europeans. In fact it's coming at a bad time economically, and scuffling natives are all too easy to sway into fascistic parties like Front Nationale, Salvini's Lega, and Golden Dawn, as the so-called Left (sick joke) parties haven't been effective in protecting and supporting their rights and interests.

So they are pissed, and being mostly bears of little brain are readily conflating moderate Islam with the knife-wielding version of modern renegades who have hijacked Islam and are using it to get donations and repay  the West for having drawn those countries' new boundaries against their will way back then.

They repudiate those lines and seek to restore a caliphate, delivering a delicious bugaboo to our media to scare us into hating on anyone but the real agents responsible for this clusterfuck.

Muslims have something we don't... an easily awakened solidarity with billions of others planet-wide of similar spiritual persuasion all feel our western societies are circling Beelzebub's drain morally speaking and have little respect for our 'values' as they see theirs as vastly superior on every level. with the scale of resource rape we Westerners have inflicted on them this last century one can easily conjecture how feeling that way is pretty normal for homo sapiens historically, anyroad the bond of the underdog is what unites them as well as language.

Our moments of solidarity - the crowds in Paris for example, pass quickly and then we mostly all get back to 'screw-thy-neighbour' values we all believe in so damn much, you know the ones like how mafia heroin smuggling profits can now be included international GDP, porn in all hotel room and movies like 'The sniper' being box office smash hits.

It's hard to be a Muslim and not grow up feeling like your religion is a sore spot, something to disavow, but you can't, because Islam is not a religion as we know it, it's much more than that, it's a way of life, an agreement felt and shared by billions of people, growing fast in numbers.

People feel scared of the moral vacuum capitalism creates and cling to religion as a kind of talisman to help them hold steady in terribly troubling times. It's a belief-system with tragic consequences as its founder was no dewy-eyed pacifist, and his followers see no need to be either. Except for a few of the most peaceful ones, most of them when asked to condemn the CH attacks dodge the question because they don't want to say what's in their hearts, that through their eyes if CH had wanted to avoid this they could have quite easily.

I think the problem could be solved through the mosques, Not by building more of them, but by checking very carefully what goes on in them, from the point of view of radical mullahs who get their jollies whipping up the young and the clueless into a froth of martyristic ecstasy.

Islam is not going away, not now, not soon, maybe not ever. We have to come to terms with it, with its allergy to irony, its paranoia, its judgementalism, its treatment of women. It's not going to be easy by any means, but it won't get easier if we don't try to use a little more cultural empathy for their plight. They know they are unpopular with those not persuaded, but I don't feel most of them even think the subject worthy of discussion really, we should _submit like they do five times a day, then we would get it, why its the best best brand of god-bothering around and why it's Allah's will for us all to become moslems willy nilly, fast or slow, the nice way or the not-so-nice.

Kismet.

I haver met really chilled moslems who get irony and don't get het up by stuff like CH, but they are pretty rare, and I would like for them to propagate a version of their religion that would be self-confident enough to know CH meant no serious harm to anyone, how it was just a wind-up, get over it.

You get all kinds, and that's why it's totally unfair to single out Moslems as the problem. Islam is a problem, imo, just as Christianity was before we took away the keys to the state car until they mellowed out enough to have some say in running a society, God knows we suffered enough through the centuries to not want a repeat of that narrowmindedness to work through all over again.  Deja vu, a nightmare we felt we had finally grown out of.

I don't use the word 'nigger' and especially wouldn't in the company of a black brother, because he may be still hurting from sins my ancestors committed on his long ago. The sins of the fathers indeed...

Likewise I think we can hold our tongues and quell our quills when we have millions of people we have invited -well many of them anyway- living right next door who feel ancestral reasons to hate us and the drones we ride in on, and are hypersensitive to anything that can trigger that.

It's called tact, and is the mark of a gentleman.

Lord knows there are plenty of attractive targets for satire in our world without pouring petrol on embers of fires often we lit.

It's basic respect, and we can't very well ask it from them if we don't give it better ourselves first.

And at this point we can't turn back short of kicking them all out and building a wall too high to climb around all of Europe, and that ain't going to happen.

The only things we can do at this point are : a. Stop meddling in their politics and deciding their fate in their own lands, b. engage their youth, embrace them into the best of what we offer before they become jihad-fodder and give them a real stake in our society, and that sure as shit ain't going to happen while the giant screwpress of austerity is inexorably squeezing whole societies into debt slavery. People will become much more generous to our new Europeans and tolerant of their whacky ways if there's some prosperity in the air.

Sorry for comment length...

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on
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In story: Open Thread of the Week

Re: Open Thread of the Week
( / )
Did we possibly reach peak political correctness, given new confrontations?

The conceit of Western liberalism - Asia Times

"I have seen, with my own two eyes, a 19-year-old white woman - smart, well-meaning, passionate - literally run crying from a classroom because she was so ruthlessly brow-beaten for using the word 'disabled'. Not repeatedly. Not with malice. Not because of privilege. She used the word once and was excoriated for it. She never came back. I watched that happen.

"I have seen, with my own two eyes, a 20-year-old black man, a track athlete who tried to fit organizing meetings around classes and his ridiculous practice schedule (for which he received a scholarship worth a quarter of tuition), be told not to return to those meetings because he said he thought there were such a thing as innate gender differences. He wasn't a homophobe, or transphobic, or a misogynist. It turns out that 20-year-olds from rural South Carolina aren't born with an innate understanding of the intersectionality playbook. But those were the terms deployed against him, those and worse. So that was it; he was gone.

"I have seen, with my own two eyes, a 33-year-old Hispanic man, an Iraq war veteran who had served three tours and had become an outspoken critic of our presence there, be lectured about patriarchy by an affluent 22-year-old white liberal arts college student, because he had said that other vets have to 'man up' and speak out about the war. Because apparently we have to pretend that we don't know how metaphorical language works or else we're bad people. I watched his eyes glaze over as this woman with $300 shoes berated him. I saw that. Myself."

by das monde on
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In story: Open Thread of the Week

Re: Open Thread of the Week
( / )
Why do so many middle-aged men feel so lost?
"We married capable women who took over every aspect of life. They ran the household, the children, the social life. For a while it seems a good meal ticket to be on, but in the end the horrible logic of the process results in us being without any kind of a role at all and not much self-confidence to find another one within the existing framework.

"We are caught between the old model of being the breadwinner and the new model of being the co-washer-upper and feeder, and the truth is we never really mastered either of these roles - old or new - and this has led to a profound sense of crisis in men. Unless you really are able to look back at what happened, you can't move on.

"[...] I feel my generation of men inhabit a place that I call neutered uselessness. We are reactive rather than proactive. Many of us have lost our self-confidence and self-respect, and become insular and inward-looking."

by das monde on
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In story: Open Thread of the Week

Re: No, Charlie Hebdo is not obsessed by Islam
( / )
The only difference is in the number of persons whom you insult. Where is the difference between a person or persons who love and revere their mothers, and persons who love and revere the founder of their religion?
by Katrin on
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"Has anyone suggested that it is not allowed to draw funny cartoons about atheists, or about Charlie Hebdo cartoonists?"

I don't find CH's gleeful celebration of the mass murder of Muslim Brothers by a military regime particularly funny, nor do I find the parody funny, but yes: it is not allowed to draw above cartoon about Charlie Hebdo cartoonists. The author, a 16 year old Muslim, was arrested. One of many. Freedom is only for those who have your opinion  Don't you pay attention to what happens to the dissenters?

But even if the "freedom" was not one-sided, I do not understand why you find a society ideal where everyone tries to hurt their neighbours as hard as they can. Where people trample on each other's feelings. Total war on anyone. I don't want to ban satire (but satire that clamours for war famously is not satire anyway), by the way. Are you misunderstanding (or misrepresenting) me on purpose?

by Katrin on
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Katrin:
the victims of your insults are not allowed to return any insults

Has anyone suggested that it is not allowed to draw funny cartoons about atheists, or about Charlie Hebdo cartoonists? You think the playing field is not level? You think the legal system is rigged in favour of CH? (hint : you're wrong)

I certainly am in favour of banning racist speech. Have you ever bothered to examine and understand any of the cartoons you decry?

In the society of your dreams, satire is banned, apparently. In my ideal world, everyone loves everyone, but we're allowed to laugh at each other. I love you, but I find you pretty funny.

by eurogreen on
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In story: Open Thread of the Week

Re: No, Charlie Hebdo is not obsessed by Islam
( / )
Still waiting for pictures of the Prophet that CH would be allowed to draw.
(hint : it's a satirical magazine)

by eurogreen on
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In story: Open Thread of the Week

Re: No, Charlie Hebdo is not obsessed by Islam
( / )
Katrin:
So no answer to my questions.

... perhaps because they are irrelevant to the subject?

Katrin:

Is it self-censorship not to say "hey nigger" when you see a black person? Is it self-censorship not to call your neighbour's mother a whore?

Irrelevant. Calling someone a nigger or calling your neighbour's mother a whore are examples of seeking to insult  a particular person. This is not in any way similar to an anti-religious cartoon, or to appreciating an anti-religious cartoon (which is my crime, apparently). So I ignored these non-examples.

by eurogreen on
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I am amazed that for you it is "dominate one's will over those of others" when a person rejects policies of humiliating and alieniating a minority. Taking into account that the "freedom" that you value here is one-sided--the victims of your insults are not allowed to return any insults--I think you are projecting.

By the way, it is not true that this is the wrong continent to condemn (and even ban by law) for instance racist speech, as Helen has pointed out. But even if it was: the society of my dreams, that I am prepared to fight for, is not based on the  humiliation and exclusion of any minority, but on love and justice. It is a vital point for me, and apparently you and Eurogreen are my political opponents.

by Katrin on
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In story: Open Thread of the Week

Re: No, Charlie Hebdo is not obsessed by Islam
( / )
"(And I'm eagerly waiting for your examples of caricatures involving Islam which would not be offensive to Moslems!)"

It would be nice, if at least you read the posts more carefully that you reply to. I pointed out that there is a difference between simply making pictures of Mohammed and making denigrating pictures of him. Many Muslims do not like any pictures of Mohammed, but the controversy is about the denigrating ones, they are the pictures Muslims universally protest against.

by Katrin on
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In story: 2-3 March 2015

Re: Living Off The Planet
( / )
Fukushima data show rise and fall in food radioactivity : Nature News & Comment

Stefan Merz, an environmental scientist at the Vienna University of Technology in Austria, and his colleagues have now analysed the database of almost 900,000 samples collected between 2011 and 2014, and publish their results in Environmental Science and Technology1.

The researchers found that during the first year after the accident, 3.3% of food from the Fukushima region had above-limit contamination -- these products were then prevented from reaching the market. It rose slightly the following year but by 2014, the proportion had fallen to 0.6%. For Japan more widely, the figures were 0.9% falling to 0.2%, says co-author Georg Steinhauser, an environmental scientist at Colorado State University in Fort Collins. Combined with the fact that people need to eat huge amounts of above-limit food to exceed the annual permitted radiation dose, the chance of anyone exceeding it was very low, he says.

That conclusion fits with several studies, including one done in 20132 that showed that only members of the public who bypassed the monitoring by eating home-grown food -- four older residents -- showed any elevated radiation levels, and these soon returned to normal when eating food that had been regulated.

But the analysis also details how radiation levels rose and then fell in various foods in the wake of the disaster (see 'Fukushima food'), to reveal information about how Japan's ecology and diet differ from those elsewhere.


by Bjinse (bjinsedankert at gmail dot com) on
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In story: Open Thread of the Week

Re: No, Charlie Hebdo is not obsessed by Islam
( / )
So no answer to my questions. Well... I am drawing my own conclusions. And I don't like your idea of what freedom is either. Muslim school children who state that though the insults against their religion does not justify murder, they refuse to take part in the compulsory honour-Charlie-Hebdo-events are arrested. The author of a CH parody: arrested. Freedom of speech is only for those who insult minorities, but not for Muslims. My mileage does indeed vary, and I would be ashamed of myself if that wasn't the case.
by Katrin on
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In story: 2-3 March 2015

Re: 2-3 March 2015
( / )
An hour with Noam: Monday March 2nd,  Democracy Now!

  http://www.democracynow.org/

 to be continued tomorrow (or so they promise).

Informative and hilarious.

by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on
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In story: Open Thread of the Week

Re: No, Charlie Hebdo is not obsessed by Islam
( / )
Well - I find the idea that someone should be offended by satire offensive - just as I find the aura of oppression, sexual abuse, sexual hypocrisy, greed, violence, intolerance, and all the other secret blessings conferred by imaginary deities whenever a critical mass of people get religion to be offensive.

Why should my sense of being offended be less important than that of other people?

Who gets to choose these things? On what basis?

If religions didn't infect at least some people with an excuse for violent and criminal lunacy, if they didn't, as matter of historical reality, correlate with all kinds of horrible things, and if they were, in fact, vastly and unarguably positive, does anyone think maybe we'd see this differently?

To satirise religion is to pour scorn on the horrors it leads to. To defend religion against these - actually quite trivial - attacks is to defend, condone, and appease those horrors.

At the very least it's a failure of reality-based historical learning to accept that there seems to be something of a correlation between popular religion and bad politics.

So no, religious beliefs do not get a pass from me on public satire.

They'll get a pass when they stop being used as a cheap excuse for crazy shit and are unambiguously associated with public and private behaviour that defines the impressive moral high ground they already claim to hold.

You know - just like finance, and aristocracy, and corporatism, and all of that, don't get a pass for similar reasons.

And currently religions clearly aren't associated with those things, in much the same way that mountains don't float in the sky and economists aren't generally generous and altruistic.

When that happens, I'll be happy to support religions being as public as they like. If it happens, I'll probably join in.

But until it happens, I'm really not very likely to change my mind about this.

And no, that does not mean I'm a racist in favour of lynch-mobbing believers, or putting them in concentration camps, or calling them names in prayer meetings, or any other nonsense along those lines. Suggesting anything like that with no basis other than disagreement is exactly the kind of crazy shit I'm talking about.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on
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In story: The Greek deal opens for expansionist e-currency

Re: Though if you want an alternative view:
( / )
Now, I must say I disagree with most of what Yves' writes in this article.

Including the first paragraph. What Ambrose Evans-Pritchard actually reported was

Greece's new currency designs are ready. The green 50 drachma note features Cornelius Castoriadis, the Marxisant philosopher and sworn enemy of privatisation.

The Nobel poet Odysseus Elytis - voice of Eastward-looking Hellenism - honours the 200 note. The bills rise to 10,000 drachma, a wise precaution lest there is a hyperinflationary shock as Greece breaks out of its debt-deflation trap at high velocity.

The amateur blueprints are a minor sensation in Greek artistic circles. They are only half in jest.

by gk (gk) on
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We're free to insult, though we can choose not to. The tenet of free speech, which I will ceaselessly stand up for, is inherent with the existence of offence.

You're equally free to virulently disagree with eurogreen (or me), and you're even free to condemn him (or me). But you cannot decide for him or me what we should disagree on or what we should condemn.

If you wish to be able to do this anyway, you're either not on the right continent - or you're not holding sufficient power to dominate your will over those of others. Either way, you've reached the end of the line.

by Bjinse (bjinsedankert at gmail dot com) on
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I remembered actually, but as you say Cyprus was hardly known for its socialist economic policy. Though I wouldn't be surprised if the Euro ministers didn't remember until they decided to ground it into the dust.

by generic on
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In story: The Greek deal opens for expansionist e-currency

Though if you want an alternative view:
( / )
Greek Kolotumbas Increasing at Disconcerting Rate | naked capitalism

Greece is staring to make contingency plans; Ambrose Evans-Pritchard reports that the government has designed new drachmas. But he argues that neither side holds the upper hand, since the prospect of a powerful Grexit is a powerful weapon.

That view may be part of what is informing the sometimes self-sabotaging aggressive Greek posture. And it may not be accurate. The US and UK press have expressed more concern about the risk of a Greek departure from the Eurozone. And recall that it took a lot of external pressure on Germany, not just from the US and UK governments, but from NATO too, to get Merkel to rein in Schauble.

However, the concern that led Eurogroup to relent may not have been about a Greek departure, but a disorderly Grexit. If enough of the hardliners (the ECB, the IMF, and the more bloody-minded members of the Eurogroup) share that view, Greece's likely assumptions about its negotiating leverage, and what degree of concessions its "partners" are prepared to make would prove to be off base.

Now, I must say I disagree with most of what Yves' writes in this article.
There is no good faith here, the negotiations are at least partly conducted for the benefit of the audience and there is no way that Spain and Portugal will be anything less than hostile. One of the few assets Greece has is that the Eurogroup's case is macoeconomic nonsense and in a fair discussion they look like clowns compared to Varoufakis. So letting him continue to talk with journalists is essential. Greece has no other way to plant a news story and would completely loose any track in the bigger societal discussion.
She also puts still too much faith in stories based on "officials'" take on things even after the earlier draft wars have shown that the Euro side has no compunction about bare face lying.

still her take is based on years of experience negotiating in the financial sector and not an irrational fear of Tony Blair lurking under the bed.

by generic on
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Thank you for posting this. I always value the rantings of a retarded whore.

by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on
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In story: Open Thread of the Week

Re: No, Charlie Hebdo is not obsessed by Islam
( / )
A propos of nothing: the next issue's (next Wednesday) cover (source)

Part of the two thirds (336 out of 523) politics related covers that constitute most of CH themes...

by Bernard on
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Free circulation of tourists yes but to settle, no.I am not too happy to see some specific romanians tribes moving freely and building favelas at Paris (a real shame).

Hopefully Schengen will be short lived now.Thank you Daesh

by fredouil (fredouil@gmailgmailgmail.com) on
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In story: 2-3 March 2015

Re: Living On The Planet
( / )
not that meaningless,

ie to be accurate i am 99.6% european, 0.% East asian, 0.1 sub saharian, 0.2% other

99.6%
European Northern European
 38.7% British & Irish
 11.2% French & German
 0.0% Scandinavian
 0.0%Finnish

24.0%Broadly Northern European

Southern European
11.7% Iberian
0.6% Italian
0.0% Sardinian
0.0% Balkan
9.4% Broadly Southern European
0.0%Broadly Southern European
Eastern European
0.0%
Ashkenazi
4.1%
Broadly European

When my wife is 99.7% East Asian & Native American
0.2% south asian
0.1% other

and my son : 51.3% East asian 48.7% European

by fredouil (fredouil@gmailgmailgmail.com) on
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News and Views

 2-3 March 2015

by afew - Mar 2, 71 comments

Your take on today's news media

 28 February - 1 March 2015

by DoDo - Feb 27, 44 comments

Your take on today's news media

 Open Thread of the Week

by afew - Mar 2, 4 comments

2-8 March

 Open Thread of the Week

by afew - Feb 23, 83 comments

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