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In general relativity, you only have energy conservation locally. As an example of non-conserved energy, think of the energy of redshifted photons. A secondary consequence of this energy non-conservation is that the ratio of energy/mass in fermions ("matter") and bosons (including photons) changed strongly.

As for temporal asymmetry, from what I can remember from my education, it is a fact (see the Big Bang, the lack of white holes, and thermodynamics) and it is the holy grail of theoretical physics. One of my professors used to say that the failure to produce temporal asymmetry is one of the reasons string theory is doomed.

by DoDo on
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An "observer" from "outside" Platonia?
by melvin on
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In story: This Is The Weekend OT

Got this from ManFromMiddletown...
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by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on
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Huh?

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on
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Energy conservation is highly problematic in general relativity. It only holds locally but not globally.

As to faster-than-light travel, again it is locally assumed to be impossible and it is more basic than time translation symmetry or energy conservation.

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on
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You're confusing time symmetry of the dynamic laws and time symmetry of a given history which of course depends on the initial conditions. You can have highly time-asymmetric evolution with symmetric laws. But this of course, begs the question of initial conditions.

However, Roger Penrose wrote in The Emperor's New Mind that near the big band the curvature of spacetime was very smooth while in the course of cosmic evolution it becomes more and more "wrinkled". He associated this to the Weyl Curvature Tensor. I don't know the status of this hypothesis.

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on
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In story: Midweek Open Thread

Citation needed (N/T)
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by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on
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Even though FTL information transfer  is already proven.

by Crazy Horse on
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If one bundles all the different disciplines* in one big heap the Science of Complex Systems is fairly well understood.  It's the Engineering of Complex Systems that lags.

* Complexity Theory, Bioinformatics, Cybernetics, Neural Nets, bio-inspired AI, Chaos mathematics, Catastrophe Theory, Swarm Intelligence, etc.

by ATinNM on
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In story: This Is The Weekend OT

Re: This Is The Weekend OT
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John Peel, possibly the most influential DJ in the world, died 10 years ago today



by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on
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In story: 24 October 2014

Re: Economy and Finance
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That is why I wrote: " they wouldn't be having THIS problem if they were part of a currency union with Russia " - leaving open the possibility of other problems. The Central Asian former Soviet Republics and Russia seem likely to fulfill most of the criteria of  Mundell's optimum currency area, excepting the  automatic fiscal transfer mechanism, which would likely be much easier to fix in such a currency union than it has been with the Euro.

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on
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In story: This Is The Weekend OT

Re: This Is The Weekend OT
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by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on
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The big bang (and the inflation period) fall within the scope of general relativity, which I never got around to actually understanding.

But my intuition says "no." Because if you violate spacetime symmetry, you get FTL travel and energy non-conservation. And those are big no-nos in general relativity.

- Jake

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on
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I have a question regarding the time symmetry & energy conservation. Doesn't the Big Bang theory imply that time is not symmetric? An "observer" would distinguish the universe now and at inflation, no?
by das monde on
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The bullshit runs deep in this one. Are we still supposed to be afraid of Saddam's WMD? Really? And no mention of that other country where ISIS operates that had an active weapons program somewhat more recently than two decades ago?
It's a pretty reasonable choice for the Kurds to push this story at least since shaming the US into following through on their rhetoric would help them a great deal.

by generic on
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In story: 24 October 2014

Re: Economy and Finance
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The TPP, TPIP, NAFTA blocks will suck no less for the most in the current social political climate. Just compare Cuba and the rest of the Carribean.

The Soviets did not press their colonies painfully in the economic sense. Rather contrary - they were supplying oil, fertilizers, dambs cheaply, with not that much in return. The fall of the USSR was quite a liberation for Russia - but it still has to match known Western colonialism pains.

by das monde on
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In story: 24 October 2014

Re: Economy and Finance
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There still could - if the ruble drops 25 % against the local currency and the local currency drops 15 % against its trade-weighted basket, then you're going to see imports go up non-trivially, while remittances fall off a cliff.

However, this algebra requires ruble-denominated imports to be a minority of imports to these countries. Which would be strange, considering the mechanics which usually govern the foreign trade.

A more probable story is that the newsies weren't paying attention. Because you'd also get the result described (that the value of remittances drop while import prices rise) if the value of the local currency drops against its trade-weighted basket while nominal remittances drop because the people who send home money see their cost of living going up faster than their income, because the ruble drops against its foreign trade partners.

But that story - if that is indeed what happened here - is much more complicated and nuanced than the simple 'depreciation bad' angle the newsie picked for this piece.

- Jake

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on
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In story: 24 October 2014

Re: Economy and Finance
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But the article says
The feeble ruble has helped push down currencies around the region, sometimes by double-digit figures.
so if this is correct, there shouldn't be large fluctuations in the value of these remittances.
by gk (gk) on
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In story: 24 October 2014

Re: Economy and Finance
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My point was that currency unions can cause more problems than they are meant to fix.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on
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In story: 25-26 October 2014

Re: Living off the Planet
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Should have used nuclear.
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on
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The Guardian view on the European Union budget demand: messing with the national interest | Editorial | Comment is free | The Guardian
Either David Cameron sought this battle or he was asleep on the job. It is hard to say which is worse

It is extremely important to keep all this firmly in mind when considering the furore over the EU's demand for Britain to pay a further £1.7bn into the European budget by the start of December. The statistical revisions whose consequences are causing so much consternation to the Conservatives in the European context are in fact the self-same revisions whose effects they will cheer to the rafters when the chancellor delivers his pre-election autumn statement in December. In both cases, they are the product of the same mechanical statistical exercise. So in that sense it is no more valid to pretend that the EU budget effect of these revisions is proof of the wickedness of Brussels than it is to pretend that the UK GDP effect of these same revisions is proof of Mr Osborne's wise management of the British economy. Both these claims are old-fashioned opportunism.

by Bernard on
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In story: 24 October 2014

Re: Economy and Finance
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Yes they would.

Because the problem isn't the price movement, or the exchange rate movement, or whatever.

The problem is that the Russian trade bloc is being embargoed, and the Russian trade bloc isn't sufficiently independent of the American world system to just shrug and go about its business.

So it's gonna suck to be a peripheral member of the Russian trade bloc for the foreseeable future. A currency union would not make it suck less. It would just mean that Russia, being the senior partner in the trade bloc, would find some other way to make the colonies bear a disproportionate share of the pain, so the center does not have to.

- Jake

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on
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Okay, then define "laws of physics."

What I'm getting at here is that the question "where do the laws of physics come from" is not a well specified question, in the same way that "this statement is false" is not a well-specified Boolean statement.

I could tell a story about how imposing temporal and spatial symmetry on the timeless formulation of the quantum Hamiltonian makes the fundamental laws of physics follow in a very satisfying and parsimonious manner.

(Specifically, conservation of energy, conservation of momentum, conservation of angular momentum, and the 1:1 mapping of phase space density to probability distribution all follow relatively straightforwardly, and you can construct pretty much all of physics outside of general relativity from those fundamentals.)

If I can find my old lecture notes I can even show you the operator algebra involved.

But that just gets us one turtle deeper, because the geometric properties of the universe are themselves just "laws of physics." In principle you could come up with all sorts of geometries and apply them to the quantum Hamiltonian (though the math will probably become intractable pretty quickly).

- Jake

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on
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And it keeps on coming...

3 California sheriffs' deputies shot, 1 dies - SFGate

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) -- An assailant shot and killed a Sacramento County sheriff's deputy and wounded two other deputies along with a bystander Friday during a series of shootings that spanned more than 30 miles through two California counties.
by Bernard on
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Indeed.

Defense got more then expected.

by A swedish kind of death on
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In story: Midweek Open Thread

Re: Midweek Open Thread
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Well. They are "in the same region" as Perth, WA. Which is not in the same region as the rest of Australia, let alone NZ.

by eurogreen on
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...Draghi warned EU leaders that more needs to be done in order to avoid a return to recession...

Return to?

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on
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In story: 24 October 2014

Re: Economy and Finance
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And there would be no fluctuations in the value of remittances from their expats working in Russia. To the extent that they could get essentials, food, energy and clothing from members sharing their currency they would be less effected by fluctuations in that currency's international value. Time will tell how much deflation the rest of the world will tolerate to accommodate the USA's economic warfare against Russia combined with a world glut of oil.

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on
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In story: 24 October 2014

Re: Economy and Finance
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A currency union with their major trade partner - Russia. If they shared the Rouble they would not be losing their market due to fluctuations in value of the Rouble.


by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on
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In story: This Is The Weekend OT

Re: This Is The Weekend OT
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Nigel Farage is doing a twitter askNigel

Question : You have been described as a cult. What are your plans for tackling adult illiteracy?

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on
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News and Views

 25-26 October 2014

by DoDo - Oct 24, 32 comments

Your take on today's news media

 24 October 2014

by In Wales - Oct 24, 42 comments

Your take on today's news media

 This Is The Weekend OT

by afew - Oct 24, 6 comments

Like it or not

 Midweek Open Thread

by Helen - Oct 22, 74 comments

One day this love will all blow over

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