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We wouldn't want to upset business.

by Colman Wed Sep 14th, 2005 at 03:17:06 AM EST

From FT.com:

More than 60 draft European Union laws will be scrapped this month, as José Manuel Barroso, European Commission president, launches Brussels' biggest ever deregulation campaign.

Mr Barroso wants to axe a wide variety of laws designed to impose EU-wide standards, claiming that some legislation was “absurd” and brought Europe into disrepute.

[...]

Laws will be axed if legislation can be better left to member states, where there is an inadequate assessment of the impact on business, or where the measure is seen as too “heavy handed”.

[...]

Mr Barroso said: “I'm not against regulation at a European level, but we are no longer in the heroic era of Jacques Delors, completing the single market with a new piece of legislation every day.”

So now legislation will be dropped if business or the tabloids don't like it? Excellent.

This is part of his attempt to rehabilitate his Commission after a bad year which has left him looking bad.


Display:
What's the FT position? That it s a good thing, or what?

"Once in awhile we get shown the light, in the strangest of places, if we look at it right" - Hunter/Garcia
by whataboutbob on Wed Sep 14th, 2005 at 04:16:41 AM EST
Straight news piece, so no opinion. They're pretty good that way on straight news.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed Sep 14th, 2005 at 04:35:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
... what laws will be axed and then join in with hooting or applause. Information, please.

Making a law about covering cleavage to protect employees from the sun is a nice example of, frankly, how absurd some laws can get.

Anyone has a link to which laws are being discussed here?

by Nomad on Wed Sep 14th, 2005 at 05:00:55 AM EST
That was one of them. Of course, that wasn't what the law would have said, but details don't generally count in this particular game, do they?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed Sep 14th, 2005 at 05:05:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I do wonder whichlaws he is referring to. How can we find out? Let's keep our eyes open...

"Once in awhile we get shown the light, in the strangest of places, if we look at it right" - Hunter/Garcia
by whataboutbob on Wed Sep 14th, 2005 at 05:07:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
From the above article:
They include proposals to protect workers from solar radiation - a draft law rejected by the European parliament last week after the media claimed it would force builders and Bavarian barmaids to cover up. Mr Barroso said it had become "a joke".

Mr Barroso is also expected to urge Commission colleagues on September 27 to withdraw proposals for EU-wide rules in areas such as food labelling, presentation and advertising, the regulation of sales promotions and weekend lorry-bans.

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed Sep 14th, 2005 at 05:24:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Another example of putting up one thing as window-dressing - ditch a lot of good regulations business doesn't like behind one that works.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Sep 14th, 2005 at 05:48:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Sorry, messed up:

"ditch a lot of good regulations business doesn't like behind one that is truly crazy."

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Wed Sep 14th, 2005 at 05:54:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Which one is truly crazy?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed Sep 14th, 2005 at 06:03:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, sorry, another modification: which seems truly crazy in the yellow press... Apparently I have still not completely woke up.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Sep 14th, 2005 at 06:09:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I wonder if this presages giving in to the US on GM foods? That might not be all good.

OTOH, even worse would be a reduction in food nutrition or safety labelling rules.

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Wed Sep 14th, 2005 at 01:51:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Barroso declared upon becoming Commission president something to the effect that he wants to be a neoliberal revolutionary. This after his economic policies at home in Portugal were a total failure (plus he cooked the books, I wonder why that is not thematised in the press every time he utters anything about economics). The French (and Dutch) NO was a big blow to him, but he is undeterred.

BTW, all this is Tony Bliar's fault. It was him who, out of his silly fear of Franco-German dominance, swung behind the candidate of the conservatives.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Wed Sep 14th, 2005 at 05:53:07 AM EST
I can't help but wonder what Barosso's conversion process from a Socialist to a neo-con was? (duh, money?)

"Once in awhile we get shown the light, in the strangest of places, if we look at it right" - Hunter/Garcia
by whataboutbob on Wed Sep 14th, 2005 at 06:12:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Generally disillusionment with communism combined with an eye for their pocketbook. It's the same journey a lot of the neocon crowd in the US made.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed Sep 14th, 2005 at 06:36:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Barroso was a Maoist at his university before the revolution, but right-wing ever since. It's just that in Portugal, going with the public mood after the collapse of fascism (we often forget that fascism didn't end with WWII on the Iberian peninsula, just grew sclerotic), right-wingers from the pro-democracy-reformist 'liberal wing' of the ancien regime named their formation Social Democratic Party. But it is a right-wing party like any other, the centre-left party (which won the elections after Barroso's departure to Brussels) is called Socialist Party.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Sep 14th, 2005 at 07:19:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]


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