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Wednesday Open Thread

by Jerome a Paris Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 01:09:34 PM EST

So what keeps you busy?


Display:
I went to visit one of my offshore windfarms:

The construction site, with the nacelles and rotors. The nacelle are first set up in the "bunny" position, ie with 2 blades attached, and transported offshore. The last blade is attached once the turbine is installed on its mast.

The installation is done with a jackup, ie a barge with legs that pull down and set on the sea bottom:



In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 01:18:59 PM EST
Who can see the wind?
neither you nor I,
but when the turbine blades do spin,
the wind is passing by.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 02:44:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Hey Jerome, i'm finally back with net access after two days with the design team on the Baltic coast, after seeing some pre-production 2.5s in the middle of nowhere, and climbing one (W2E Fuhrländer).  Klasse design.

So what was your impression visiting your site.  Looks like V80 or V90.  Did you get to climb one?  Are any commissioned or in operation?  Did you transfer from ship to tower?

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Fri Nov 23rd, 2007 at 03:48:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Happy Birthday, Migush!!!!!!!!

I guess it wouldn't feel complete if your best friends couldn't join the party... at least virtually.

Everybody...a big cheer for a faithful front-pager (and husband :))!!!!!



"If you cannot say what you have to say in twenty minutes, you should go away and write a book about it." Lord Brabazon

by Barbara on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 01:20:22 PM EST
what.. and he did not say anything..

Oh nutty boy!!!

Celebration day here in ET!!!!!!

A pleasure

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 01:22:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Okay miguel, you could have said. I guess I'm just gonna have to have a drink for you here (well, I know you practically don't).

See yer when I get back for a real one.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 01:24:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ha grassed up to the masses ;-)

Happy Birthday.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 01:29:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Happy Birthday Migeru!
by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 01:37:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Feliz cumpleanos, Migeru.

And I'll give my consent to any government that does not deny a man a living wage-Billy Bragg
by ManfromMiddletown (manfrommiddletown at lycos dot com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 01:45:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Huh?! He never said - and now he's run off!!

Any, HAPPY BIRTHDAY MIGERU!!

And cheers!

The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman

by dvx (dvx.clt ät gmail dotcom) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 01:56:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Happy birthday, Miguel!
by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 02:04:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Happy Birthday, Migush!

(any excuse to say "Migush"...)

"Pretending that you already know the answer when you don't is not actually very helpful." ~Migeru.

by poemless on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 02:10:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's okay, poemush.

We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 02:44:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh, that's not the same...

Maybe "poemechka..."

Did you know Stalin wrote romantic poetry?  

<gah!  I'm totally freaked out!>

"Pretending that you already know the answer when you don't is not actually very helpful." ~Migeru.

by poemless on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 02:47:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
poemová.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 02:50:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The morpheme -ush does not mark grammatical gender.

We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 03:06:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Can I say "Migushka?"  Because I'd prefer to call you that.  Or would I have to say "Migushek?"

And I think the "ova" is only used for surnames, but I could be wrong.  

I really know nothing about Czech diminutives.  Just that in Russian, the possibilities are endless...

"Pretending that you already know the answer when you don't is not actually very helpful." ~Migeru.

by poemless on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 03:12:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That depends on the case, right? -a is the masculine animate accusative ending.

I think you can get away with Migushek, poemushinko!

We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 03:29:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No, I think sometimes you can end a male name in "a", in the diminutive.  In the nominative case.  Like... Misha. :)

So I will say, "Migushka."

I really don't think poemushinko does it either.  Has to roll off the tongue.

Poemechka, poemka, poemasha, poemlessnitsa...

"Pretending that you already know the answer when you don't is not actually very helpful." ~Migeru.

by poemless on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 03:41:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh God, no! You are like Miguel... er, Migush... I thought it was his comment when I read it. He tends to really butcher Czech any way he can....his favorite word is "prasovat", a verb he created from the word "prase" which means pig, and pracovat, which means to work. I have no idea why he is so attached to this word... I do call him Pigush when he leaves a mess (which is often), but I have never heard anyone say "to pig" in any language, so I don't know why he insists on using it.

"If you cannot say what you have to say in twenty minutes, you should go away and write a book about it." Lord Brabazon
by Barbara on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 09:16:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]


We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 10:02:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
£1.50?

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 10:03:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That just illustrates the function of the item.

We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 10:22:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
and illustrates the danger of replying from the recent comments page, without seeing the context ;-)

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 10:25:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Barbara:
I have never heard anyone say "to pig" in any language,

In French, the verb "cochonner" exists...

"Dieu se rit des hommes qui se plaignent des conséquences alors qu'ils en chérissent les causes" Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet

by Melanchthon on Fri Nov 23rd, 2007 at 07:40:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Did you know Hitler painted lanscapes?

We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 05:13:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Until Deutsche Welle makes that their official slogan, I can't say I care...

"Pretending that you already know the answer when you don't is not actually very helpful." ~Migeru.
by poemless on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 05:17:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Useless Movie Quotes - Producers, The
Churchill! With his cigars, with his brandy, and his rotten painting! Rotten! Hitler, there was a painter. He could paint an entire apartment in one afternoon--two coats!


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 07:39:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Migueluco, cariñin, que sea un Feliz Dia!!!!

Thank you for telling Barbara!  Muuuuuaa for three!!!


Our knowledge has surpassed our wisdom. -Charu Saxena.

by metavision on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 02:43:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Have a good one!
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 02:45:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Happy birthday! Grattis på födelsedagen!

"The basis of optimism is sheer terror" - Oscar Wilde
by NordicStorm (m<-at->sturmbaum.net) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 03:46:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Happy birthday, Mig!
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 04:04:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Nice husband you've got there Barbara. Tell him Happy Birthday from me.

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 04:17:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
How about "a nice wife you've got there, Migeru?" ;)

"If you cannot say what you have to say in twenty minutes, you should go away and write a book about it." Lord Brabazon
by Barbara on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 09:18:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
What, as in "it would be a shame if (s)he were to suffer a terrible accident"?

We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 09:38:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
these blogger bullys are getting more sophisticated

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 09:40:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Gratulerer med dagen, Miguel!
by Solveig (link2ageataol.com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 04:20:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Happy polymath!

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 04:28:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Who's that?

We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 05:12:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's that chap with the 100 billion neurons. Just like me.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 06:07:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Many happy returns, Mig!

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 04:29:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Bon Anniversaire, Mig!

"Dieu se rit des hommes qui se plaignent des conséquences alors qu'ils en chérissent les causes" Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet
by Melanchthon on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 05:36:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Many happy front pages! (And an excellent birthday too!)
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 06:02:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
お誕生日おめでとう、ミッ 464;くん!

Truth unfolds in time through a communal process.
by marco on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 06:45:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
كل سنة وأنت طيب

Jumping in on this a bit late, but... Happy birthday!  

by the stormy present (stormypresent aaaaaaat gmail etc) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 07:34:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
<big cheer> Happy Birthday!
by nanne (zwaerdenmaecker@gmail.com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 08:06:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Happy Birthday Migeru.
by lychee on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 11:19:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Happy Birthday!  

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 11:34:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Late to this party...

Oh well. Here are the balloons for Mig!!

*starts to look for a clean, unused cup... *

by Nomad on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 02:48:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
How old is he?

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 03:23:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It's a number with 6 divisors, including 1 and itself.

We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 04:38:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That young!? Happy belated birthday. So you were born in a year whose sum is 4? Just to make up for the late auguries let's make it a solar birthday.
by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 05:02:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
4?

We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 05:11:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The divisor characterization is ambiguous in the range under consideration . 32 --> {1,2,4,8,16,32} means born 1975, year of the death of Franco, sum modulo 9 = 4, two posts with this conclusion. So will now I bet on 28 {1,2,4,7,14,28}.

Pierre
by Pierre on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 05:27:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah, I had no idea de Gondi meant "modulo 9".

We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 05:36:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Nor did I ...</snork>
by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 07:51:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Are you the reincarnation of Franco????

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 05:06:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
LOL

According to my mother I was due in early December but the excitement of the day that Franco died caused her an early delivery.

I am one of the chosen few that wasn't born under Franco or under Juan Carlos.

We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 05:10:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
to the 6-digit geek club.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 05:51:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
6-digit?
by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 07:53:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You're clearly not a geek.

We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 08:01:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
How do you become a member of that sect?
by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 11:18:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Ok, Happy Birthday!
by das monde on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 03:46:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Boldog Születésnapot, Mihályka!

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 05:24:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Gluecklichen Herzstrumpf as we say in Germany and many happy returns, you spring chicken.  All the best to you and your family!
by PeWi on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 06:59:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Lucky heartsock? Lucky heartsmurf? Wud?

We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 07:05:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well (-:

The German greeting has two words with are each made up off two syllabels.

Herz - lichen : Heart - ily

Glueck - wunsch : Luck - wish

Glueck-lichen (luck-ily) is a quite straightforward swap, but Herz-wunsch (Heart-wish) does not make sense (even in German, and not for children anyway), so what sounds like Wunsch, and is on a childs mind? Yes, Strumpf (stocking) - well not really, and actually I think there was a Schlumpf (Smurf) in there before, somewhere.

I know, is does not make any sense (and might also not be very widespread in Germany - so I recommend not to use it). But it is a unique expression, a wish for a unique celebration.
I am not very good at repeating what others have said before me, anyway. But I really like the English expression "Many happy returns". It took me a while to comprehend what it meant, there not being a straightforward German translation of it. But it is my favourite understated Birthday wish for anybody. A Birthtee cannot change the fact of the birth day, but the hopeful forward looking aspect of the "Happy returns" is a "Next Year in Jerusalem" expression of hope, doggedness, and wanton optimism.

by PeWi on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 08:28:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
what??? we reached the 6 million page views mark..

AND NOTHING?????

SO this is the clebration side of the open thread...

to celebrate the 6 million mark and the 60.000 viewers per month we are stabilizing on..

So full of 6 I guess someon did  some kind of arrangementqwith someone starting with Dev and finishing with il.

Ei but I know nothing. I am from Barcelona

A pleasure

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 01:20:57 PM EST
Knowing less than you, I presume this is a good thing. Do we own kos yet ?

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 01:25:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The dev------il asked for something a little bit more difficult to get in exchange for kos.

But I am sure the comittteeee of dwarfs is thinking about the proposal.

A pleasure

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 01:28:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Nothing?

It's Migeru's birthday!

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 06:02:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Greeting from a dark bar in Sandanski. I only came here cos I had a complimentary drinks slip that wasn't compimentary (damn). But now I'm here wifi could hold me for a bit.

Still running around lost in a fog of mis-translations. Need lessons, (start tomorrow).

Tired from a long swim and sauna (yea, life's a bitch ain't it ? :-))

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 01:22:20 PM EST
Go back to the sauna and join the virtual celebration!!!!!

Or stay in the bar and join the virtual celebrations!!!!

A pleasure

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 01:24:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's a darned nuisance that 'beer' isn't universal.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 02:51:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That reminds me of a joke

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 02:57:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Tonight I'm driving overnight to Seattle with some friends for thanksgiving weekend. Kind of dead at work as a lot of people take the whole week off.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 01:25:44 PM EST
Drive safely, lots of coffee and red bull. We want you here in the morning.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 01:34:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
fortunately we have a pool of four drivers.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 01:35:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And no Velveeta Clam Dip.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 04:05:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Red Bull and beef jerky for the win. I may try to work in some twinkies too.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 04:07:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC NEWS | England | Norfolk | Hospital declares major incident
A general hospital has said it is having to turn patients away because of a major alert which has left it with no beds available to new admissions.

The Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital is on Black Alert and has declared a major incident in order to discharge non-urgent patients.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 01:33:17 PM EST
Stand by for more of these. My number one Health authority to watch for a major financial/health cockup is Redbridge. I have a well-placed friend who tells me super-scary stories.

Apparently it's not pfi, more the fact that the populations counts are wrong and the whole area is critically under-funded for actual need.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 01:36:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I have contacts in local government around there, and know that the infrastructure is completely lacking for the number of people there.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 01:53:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Interesting diary up on Daily Kos about trade.

<blockqoute>Forget what the pundits and some of the elements of the Democratic corporate establishment think: John Edwards is reflecting the sentiment of Iowans when he points out the dangerous effects of globalization.</blockqoute>

Trade is shaping up to be a huge issue in the 2008 Democratic primary.  You guys should be paying attention, the way that things are going on the continent, you could be having these discussion with the same intensity in 10 or 15 years.  

Sarkozy looks a lot like Reagan, provoking a confrontation with labor in order to crush them.

And I'll give my consent to any government that does not deny a man a living wage-Billy Bragg

by ManfromMiddletown (manfrommiddletown at lycos dot com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 01:39:28 PM EST
It is significant that these discussion are even happening in the US, 25-years later than they needed to happen.  What will save Europe from our mistakes is the ability to discuss the issues in the open.  Do not back down on intelligent, open discourse and you will succeed.

That said, the "candidates" have discussed "tearing up NAFTA" et al but still are not saying publicly what Sego dared to say, that we need to not go backwards but rather continue moving forward onto a second step of our global trade agreements, where we globalize workers rights and environmental protections.

It is absolutely reasonable to open trade fully, provided the other countries also agree to pay their workers fair wages and not pollute their entire ecosystem.

by paving on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 01:48:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
provided the other countries also agree to pay their workers fair wages and not pollute their entire ecosystem.

And each country is beholden to the people who live within its borders--wherever they may say they be--to

pay their workers fair wages

and

not pollute their entire ecosystem

If Europe can solve those two, it can be an exemplar, first among many, or next up, that's the direction...

heh...  I enjoyed your comment very much.

Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.

by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 06:51:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
FT.com / Companies / Financial services - The pitfalls of financial globalisation grow clearer
Conventional wisdom has it that globalisation and the spread of deregulation have been an economic boon for the English-speaking countries. Having run down their manufacturing as a percentage of gross domestic product in the 1980s and 1990s, the US and the UK have been less vulnerable to Chinese competition in this cycle than the big economies of continental Europe. And with disproportionately large financial sectors, these two countries have also enjoyed a financial windfall from the rise of China and other emerging markets.
As long as the Angloamericansthe West™ could reap the profits of globalised capital, all was fine and dandy. But when others reap profits or the Anglo disease starts to bite, the FT discovers the "pitfalls of globalization".
A more fundamental point is that China and other emerging market countries are unilaterally rolling back the high tide of liberalisation. Thanks to their rise, more of the world economy operates under mercantilist pegged exchange rate regimes. By investing their official reserves in developed world government debt, they reduce the cost of public sector borrowing, making a return of big government easier. As co-conspirators with the US Federal Reserve in creating the credit bubble, the same countries have contributed to a boom and bust cycle in housing and finance which will lead to a political backlash, soon to be followed by cumbersome regulation. Meanwhile, sovereign wealth funds are indirectly reversing the privatisation trend that began in the 1980s through a re-expansion of state ownership, but on a cross-border basis. That in turn will spawn an illiberal political reaction that will inhibit global capital flows. On the face of it, continental Europe ought now to be better placed to cope. Yet this is no time for schadenfreude . Two German banks that dabbled in subprime structured products have had to be rescued. The dabbling arose from an urgent need to raise returns in an over-politicised, over-regulated, but under-profitable German banking system.
The point of globalization and liberalization was to hollow out the public sector, but with global access to capital markets, those countries that still allow their government to invest on a large scale are buying our privatised assets. That cannot be! This was supposed to be for the benefit of the Angloamerican oligarchyWestern™ private interests, not anyone else!
There is no question that smart, global finance has been a good thing. Without the recycling of capital, excess savings in Asia would have been profoundly deflationary. Yet from today's global vantage point, we have undoubtedly all had too much of this good thing. Whether it is ever possible to have just the right amount is another question.
Now that we've captured all the wealth we could and the wheel is turning against us, it is time to denounce globalization. We have to protect our spoils from the inferior peoples!

The whole self-serving article warrants a deconstruction.

We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 03:02:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's the US!  It's Germany!  It's China!

Our knowledge has surpassed our wisdom. -Charu Saxena.
by metavision on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 03:30:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Speaking of money, almost every bank has his secrets:
In Belgium, there's an ongoing campaign: My money, clear conscience?



The struggle of man against tyranny is the struggle of memory against forgetting.(Kundera)

by Elco B (elcob at scarlet dot be) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 03:35:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
This is good:

FT.com / Companies / Financial services - The pitfalls of financial globalisation grow clearer

Two German banks that dabbled in subprime structured products have had to be rescued. The dabbling arose from an urgent need to raise returns in an over-politicised, over-regulated, but under-profitable German banking system.

The unpoliticised, not over-regulated, and uber-profitable Anglo banking system was under no urgent pressure to raise returns and therefore did no dabbling in subprime, right?

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 04:23:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
over-politicised, over-regulated, but under-profitable

There's a real negative swing in that, where "un-profitable" is the determinant, the heavy factor that decides.  I agree with over-politicised, I think "over-regulated" is the wrong angle--the angle is "wrongly regulated", so I see the base tone as "you're too political, and you're telling us what to do, and we're still not making money...with money as some strange talisman, not what it can buy but what....protection money....protection from "less", so the huge meme: "less is more"--

Less tax is more investment!

Less profits are more investment!

Less money is more time!

Less energy is more symbiosis!

Less pain is less pain!

Heh....cough!

Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.

by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 07:02:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
John Plender is an FT columnist and chairman of Quintain

And Quintain is... you guessed it, a property firm...

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 05:08:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Although I gratefully concede that this is not the issue it is on the other side of the pond. there are a couple of diaries on Kos here and here

But knowing most of you may (probably correctly) feel this an issue that is really mine and mine alone, I'd just like to quote this from gender.org

the media's reluctance to cover our deaths lies near the heart of this project. It can be all-but-impossible to find honest, reliable media on the death of a transgendered person: It either does not exist (which is how one can cover thirty years of cases and still only have as many as I have to present), or it uses names that the deceased did not own, and pronouns that did not fit their reality.

There is no "safe way" to be transgendered (Helen's emphasis - believe me that's not an exagerration): as you look at the many names collected here, note that some of these people may have identified as drag queens, some as heterosexual crossdressers, and some as transsexuals. Some were living very out lives, and some were living fully "stealth" lives. Some were identifying as male, and some, as female. Some lived in small towns, and some in major metropolitan areas.

In fact, one thing that has come to light in doing this project is how much more is yet to be done. Over the last decade, one person per month has died due to transgender-based hate or prejudice, regardless of any other factors in their lives. This trend shows no sign of abating.



keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 01:45:05 PM EST
For some reason I thought this was yesterday.  I was at an equality conference and it was mentioned in one of the speeches, plus some reps had the ribbons on as well.  It has been noticed.

I got sight of an in-progress report into the issues and discrimiantion faced by transgendered people in Wales. A lot of it was based on focus groups and interviews and highlighted the complexity of the issues, the complete ignorance of wider society and the shocking amounts of discrimination faced, even from those who really ought to know better such as medical practitioners, police and so on.

It's no small thing.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 03:11:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, I sometimes have to remember that my experiences, and that of those I meet regularly, are of pretty liberal metropolitan culture. I, too, have heard some horrible stories from rural parts, including a particularly vicious story from N Wales.

But generally, britain, being an urban environment (mostly), is fairly free from this crap (I generalize) in comparison with say rural USA.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 03:18:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It seems like it needs reminding in this day and age, but city life is liberating.

We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 04:39:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I don;t know how good your German is, but there are two articles in the current Spiegel about Transgendered People: The Third Gender a four page long article generally about transgendered people in Germany and a shorter one on
"Yvonne Buschbaum
, a German Champion and twice European Bronze medalist Pole jumper who recently decided to undergo hormone therapie and become a man.

They seem quite well written to my untrained eye.

by PeWi on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 07:24:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Hence the level of my intellect.

My new flickr photo gallery is only three BBC News screenshots so far.

Very juvenile.

(I need to find the original articles, btw.)

by Plutonium Page (page dot vlinders at gmail dot com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 01:54:35 PM EST
Get well soon. Dunno what you're sick with but a little (well a lot usually) of what you fancy does ya good.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 02:13:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]

     

This is a picture of a rabbit with a Boeing 747-400 in the background :-)
(Click to enlarge)  



The struggle of man against tyranny is the struggle of memory against forgetting.(Kundera)
by Elco B (elcob at scarlet dot be) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 02:19:18 PM EST

The top one (blue) is relevant for US oil consumption. The bottom one is relevant for European oil consumption. Discuss.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 02:20:06 PM EST
I thought the recent slip in the oil price was unlikely to last, but....

slightly off topic, but I had a conversation about peak oil here today with a bulgarian and he was pretty emphatic that the oil companies have a hydrogen technology that they're sitting on. I was curious as to where this came from cos I've never heard it before.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 02:33:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]


In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 02:58:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Priceless.

We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 03:04:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ha, ha, ha!  </snark>

Well, you tried.

Our knowledge has surpassed our wisdom. -Charu Saxena.

by metavision on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 03:26:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Just ot rub in what I missed when i had to make a weather-related detour on my trip to Bulgaria

A beer tour of Czech republic. No golden tiger pub tho' and having been to the Eggenberg brewery tap in Cesky Krumlov, that'd be high on my list too.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 02:29:53 PM EST
Well, I will be offline for the next 4 days or so.  Maybe I'll do that "What is a managed democracy" thing next week...  

Until then, if you get bored, here are some things to read.  

1. Bush 'involved' in CIA leak case

A former White House press secretary has said the US president was involved in misinforming the public over the leaking of a CIA agent's identity.

In an excerpt from his book, Scott McClellan says George W Bush helped mislead the public over the role in the affair of two White House aides.

The CIA agent, Valerie Plame, says her identity was leaked because her diplomat husband opposed the Iraq war.

2. Does the Bomb Iran! crowd have any credibility left?

It now appears that the Bomb Iran! crowd is just making it up as they go along. The latest case in point is Joshua Muravchik's column in this morning's USA Today. Let's take a look at Muravchik versus reality:

(...)

Muravchik:

Iran also might launch a nuclear missile at Israel, which Ahmadinejad wants 'wiped off the map.' Israel could strike back, but so what?"

Reality: As Blake noted earlier today, Israel has second-strike capability in its submarines. A nuclear strike by Iran would mean its complete destruction. So, please, someone in the Bomb Iran! crowd logically explain to me why Iran is the first nation in history to defy more than a half century of mutually assured destruction (MAD) theory? Give me a break. Rhetoric from politicians is one thing, but there's absolutely nothing to suggest ordinary Iranians are prepared to die by the millions in order to "wipe Israel off the map." Get real.

Muravchik:

Only strikes against Iran's nuclear facilities can forestall these terrible scenarios.... We would send no troops, conquer no land. Rather, we would act in pre-emptive self-defense."

Reality: I'll believe this when someone in the know tells me that our intelligence on Iran is far better than our intelligence was on Iraq. So far, I have yet to meet such a person from inside the U.S. government. I have met Israelis who say their intelligence on Iran is good, and it's not improbable they would share it. Still, what exactly will airstrikes accomplish? Setting Iran's program back another five years? Or does the Bomb Iran! crowd intend to send special ops in to assassinate Iran's scientists? That's what it would really take to "eliminate" their program. It's laughable that the same people who criticized Bill Clinton's cruise-missile approach to national defense now want to mimic it.

"Stark choices" make for good newspaper copy. But reality is far more complicated. Mao, Stalin, Kim -- they were all far worse than the wanna-be dictator Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. We negotiated with all of them. And in the end, we won.

3. Edward Lucas' Cold War Hustle

"Ed is known at the paper, as even he would admit, as a bit of a loon."

       --Anonymous Economist Correspondent

Just go read the whole thing.  It's really funny...

4. And can someone explain to me wtf is up with THIS?

The Russian government's English-language overseas news network, Russia Today, wants you to make them your preferred source for cable and satellite news.

So they recruited a new mascot for their advertisements: Josef Stalin. In a series of ads promoting the network, Russia Today asks if you knew the brutal, genocidal dictator also wrote romantic poetry.

Between the extermination of the kulaks, the genocide of the Ukranians, the exile of an entire generation of intellectuals to labor camps, the brutal invasion of the Baltics, the planned genocide of Russia's Jews, his iron-fisted rule of Eastern Europe and the massive deportations to Central Asia... Russia Today would like to let you know that Stalin was really a pretty nice guy.

Normally I'd think this was a product of the hysterical imagination of the NCW crowd.  But no.  These ads are running on Kommersant.  I'm admittedly worried about what it might mean if I did not know Stalin wrote romantic poetry...    I hope that Surkov fellow is not behind this.  Why are all the cute guys evil?!?!

"Pretending that you already know the answer when you don't is not actually very helpful." ~Migeru.

by poemless on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 02:36:41 PM EST
is a member of ET

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 03:00:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
</wipes up tea I just spit all over my desk...>

Well, no one ever said ET doesn't attract loons...

"Pretending that you already know the answer when you don't is not actually very helpful." ~Migeru.

by poemless on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 03:02:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Wow. Does that mean we're going to be featured in an Economist rant sometime soon?

The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman
by dvx (dvx.clt ät gmail dotcom) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 02:43:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
IIRC, he blew in, demonstrated he couldn't intellectually (psychologically?) handle a communication medium where he wasn't privileged in debate, and buggered off - ne'er to be seen again.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 01:22:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
edwardlucas:
the Economist neither relents nor repents (4.00 / 3)
I am a journalist at The Economist, covering CEE.  We have roundly criticised the administration for their incompetence. We demanded Rumsfeld's resignation, backed Kerry ahead of Bush, and continually criticise Bush for his lack of engagement in the Arab-Israeli conflict.

Secondly the idea that "British" (actually English) libel laws in away constrain us from writing about the politics of America is fanciful.



We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 01:31:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well if Beauty/Evil=A constant

and Beauty + Brains = a constant

Surely the resident mathematical geniuses will be able to tell you that all eautiful evil  maniacs havent really got the brains necessary.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 03:07:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm not good at math.  

"Pretending that you already know the answer when you don't is not actually very helpful." ~Migeru.
by poemless on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 03:17:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Is now at ... Russia Today.

http://www.russiatoday.ru/imho

Can't say I am shocked (I'd explain why, but want to avoid dividing the world into anti- and pro-Putin people...)  But I do miss Untimely Thoughts and Intelligent.ru, which did some pretty good coverage of Russia, of the non-hysterical type.

"Pretending that you already know the answer when you don't is not actually very helpful." ~Migeru.

by poemless on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 06:01:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Any idea why Lavelle discountinued Untimely Thoughts?

We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 06:20:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Nope, but he has a google group for it now...  But it's not public.  

I'm more concerned about Intelligent.ru.  There was an amazing amount of great stuff in there.  I'd really like to know what happened to that...

"Pretending that you already know the answer when you don't is not actually very helpful." ~Migeru.

by poemless on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 06:23:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
just in:

vodafone has sued to stop apple locking the iphone to one network, and they've come to a compromise, the locked phone goes for €400, the unlocked will cost €999!

germany taking the lead here...

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 02:48:54 PM EST
what keeps me busy...the usual, massaging humans and training my horse.

my partner and i went up to a hot springs near bologna, and spent a couple of nights for a treat.

i can't describe the feeling these waters leave me with, though 'grand' and 'integrated' come to mind!

taking the waters...so timeless...

back in the groove again, it feels good to be home.

i saw a trenchant piece by norman mailer yesterday, which i think some here will appreciate: hat tip to counterpunch http://www.counterpunch.org/stclair11132007.html


Here's a taste of Mailer at full-throttle from Miami and the Siege of Chicago. He's writing about the origins of the Yippies and the entropy eating at the American soul:

So the Yippies came out of the Hippies, ex-Hippies, diggers, bikers, drop-outs from college, hipsters up from the South. They made a community of sorts, for their principles were simple-everybody, obviously, must be allowed to do (no way around the next three words) his own thing, provided he hurt no one doing it-they were yet to learn that society is built on many people hurting many people, it is just who does the hurting which is forever in dispute. They did not necessarily understand how much their simple presence hurt many good citizens in the secret valve of the heart-the Hippies and probably the Yippies did not recognize the depth of schizophrenia on which society is built. We call it hypocrisy, but it is schizophrenia, a modest ranch-house life with Draconian military adventures; a land of equal opportunity where a white culture sits upon a Black; a horizontal community of Christian love and a vertical hierarchy of churches-the cross was well designed! A land of family, a land of illicit heat; a politics of principle, a politics of property; nation of mental hygiene with movies and TV reminiscent of a mental pigpen; patriots with a detestation of obscenity who pollute their rivers; citizens with a detestation of government control who cannot bear any situation not controlled. The list must be endless, the comic profits are finally small-the society was able to stagger on like a 400-lb policeman walking uphill because living in such an unappreciated and obese state it did not at least have to explode into schizophrenia-life went on. Boys could go patiently to church and wait their turn to burn villages in Vietnam.

I don't believe we will ever see writing with that kind of electricity again.

he's obviously not coming to ET enough!

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 02:50:08 PM EST
I used to go to Provincetown in the summer.  Mailer lived there and had a nasty reputation for getting drunk out of his mind and starting fights in bars or on the streets, having to be escorted home.  And to give you some perspective, there are really only 2 streets in P-Town.  No one was safe!

"Pretending that you already know the answer when you don't is not actually very helpful." ~Migeru.
by poemless on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 02:57:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
yup he's like halfway between ernest hemingway and joe bageant, rooted in a 40's idea of maleness, explosive and miscreant, but cutting through the awful bland complacency of the 50's and early 60's.

remember the 'angry young men' of london in that era?

mediahype, for sure, but the myth reveals something.

we'd just 'conquered' fascism, we were supposed to make a brave new world, and the same old shysters were running things like before.

rage was a fuel for these rebellious thinkers to climb out of the rut of their zeitgeist.

raw, honest, and whipsawing between righteous belligerence and alcoholic breakdown, they gave their guts to moving society on to becoming more self-reflective, through sharing so nakedly the dysfunction they mirrored in their personal lives.

the cognitive strain broke many creative, more sensitive persons.

for them, as for many, this was the price of opening their eyes.

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 03:26:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Helen's post in this thread inspired me to look around a bit if I could find recent reports on transgendered people in Europe. So far no luck, but found a press release from today tolerance in general decreases.

ENAR - New on this site

Press Release: ENAR's Shadow Report paints a serious picture of the situation of racism in the EU

 - Manifestations of racism in Europe continue, some forms of racism are on the increase, notably Islamophobia, and there has been a significant upsurge of racist violence and crime.

These are the conclusions of ENAR's 2006 Shadow Report on racism in Europe. (21.11.2007)

There are 26 European countries reports.

The struggle of man against tyranny is the struggle of memory against forgetting.(Kundera)

by Elco B (elcob at scarlet dot be) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 02:50:49 PM EST
thank you for trying, but as I said, this is more an issue for our transatlantic cousins than here in europe. Okay, western europe I say smugly, I actually have no idea what it's like in new europe.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 03:12:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
here's some commentary on pakistan that i found well written and cogent.

what do you think?

The fact is that democracy is noisy and Pakistan's elites (rather like America's at this point) are not used to any noise but their own.

Let's add to the mosque flatteners-who are not, it must be noted, secular either-the people who often assert Pakistanis don't want Taliban rule or Islamist vice squads banning music and shrouding women. These people may seem similar but are not always the same. They produce as counterevidence South Asian Sufism, Pakistan's shrine culture, its wonderful tradition of devotional and antinomian music. But this vision is also balanced on the wobbliest foundation: all it takes is a determined and destructive minority to shut down the traditions of religious openness and dissent, to turn them into memories held in huddled solitude. This is, in fact, what has slowly been happening since the eighties when Zia-ul-Haq launched his assault on Pakistani culture.

What faces Pakistan, then, is a kleptocratic military, arteries pumped with money from the US, a reckless, inbred and corrupt middle class, feudals, (Benazir Bhutto included) who seem to belong in a Transylvanian nightmare, exercising their seigneurial rights, and a growing body of petty bourgeois Islamist clerics who want their piece of the national and global pie, and are determined to leave anything that's heterodox and wonderful about the Muslim tradition smouldering and ruined.

Meanwhile, as in Swat, where an Islamist cleric is trying to set up a little mini state, the radical Islamists of the Pakistani kind try to ensure that children don't get polio vaccinations and forbid education for girls in the name of God. One of the most heartwrenching sights during the Lal Masjid catastrophe was that of parents and family members of students of the madrassa who had come to get their children back-they seemed lost and reduced, caught between a contemptuous bureaucracy they didn't know how to negotiate and clerics who had promised their children a free education and turned them, instead, into indoctrinated cannon fodder.

Most striking, though, was that they had sent their sons and daughters from villages across the NWFP for an education. It is in the absence of a functional educational system and the presence of tremendous poverty that such crises thrive. Yet the Musharraf government and its supporters seem to think that BMW and Porsche outlets in the major cities that are now, more than ever, centres of consumption will fix the ills of the nation. Segments of Karachi have begun to seem like a giant mall-people dashing back and forth in greedy paroxysms while the poor watch the carnival of consumption.



"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 03:12:52 PM EST
The article is Titled:

Corrupt Elites and a Kleptocratic Military
The Roots of Pakistan's Political Crisis

Which overall I can't disagree with.

I do object to this passage however:

Let's add to the mosque flatteners-who are not, it must be noted, secular either-the people who often assert Pakistanis don't want Taliban rule or Islamist vice squads banning music and shrouding women. These people may seem similar but are not always the same. They produce as counterevidence South Asian Sufism, Pakistan's shrine culture, its wonderful tradition of devotional and antinomian music. But this vision is also balanced on the wobbliest foundation: all it takes is a determined and destructive minority to shut down the traditions of religious openness and dissent, to turn them into memories held in huddled solitude.

because it seems designed around Warrrr on Terra hysteria.

The crucial worry about Pakistan is not that a Pashtun Taliban will take over the whole country, but that the emergence of a Pakistani Taliban Army will prompt a three-way ethnic civil war.

Indic (country majority) vs. Baluch (Iranian backed) vs. Pashtun (Taliban backed)

Not that this is any less horrific an outcome for the people of Pakistan, but it doesn't represent the kind of Taliban-proto-caliphate that some US foreign policy types are mooting...

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 05:22:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Do Sharif, Musharraf and Bhutto represent different ethnic groups, or factions within the same ethnic group?

We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 05:31:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
They are all from factions within the dominant Indic group. Indeed the whole governmental elite largely comes from the majority region.

It's worth noting that the "Indic" group isn't ethnically homogeneous, but in the past (I haven't visited Pakistan in a long while and I don't have extensive contacts there at the moment) there were not significant ethnic (as opposed to regional) rivalries within the dominant grouping.

Analysing the elite factions, Musharraf represents the Army, through and through.

Sharif's powerbase is in civilian politics and drew support from a relatively urban voting base, whilst Bhutto drew from a (potentially rotten borough style) rural voting base.

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 05:44:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I have reason to believe that the Spanish government is suppressing the "inconvenient truth" about the ecological unsustainability of Spain's economic model. In this the Zocialist government is no different from the previous Aznarite administration.

We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 03:35:07 PM EST
tell uZ more!

Our knowledge has surpassed our wisdom. -Charu Saxena.
by metavision on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 04:45:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I have a couple of sources. I'll write more when I have more solid "evidence".

We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 05:03:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
At the suggestion of In Wales the special theme of this Friday's photoblog is "In my neighbourhood." Notice the error in spelling. Well, we Americans have to throw a bone to the Brits every once in a while.
So get your photos ready of your home, quartier, hood, town, city, ville, etc. And if you don't have any, just post your regular photos in the main section of "photos as usual."

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 03:59:16 PM EST
So I worked 28 hours this week and got paid for 40.  And you thought the French transit workers had it good....

Right, off for the holiday in a few hours.  Spending tomorrow in New Jersey, The Armpit of the NortheastTM.  Hope all are well, and Happy Needless Turkey Murder Day to fellow Yanks.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 04:32:25 PM EST
Don't know why, but it's all happening. Projects coming together. I'm just waiting for the downside 8-(

Just watched the 'Perfect Stranger' - halle berry good for the first time, but the last 10 minutes sucks. Then I watched High Stakes Poker season one - wonderful! Now I'm going to watch a couple of episodes of 4400 with my friends and some G+T's upstairs. Nothing serious to do now till a recording session at 14.00 tomorrow.

Yessssssss.........

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 04:36:26 PM EST
a journalist requested to be waterboarded to see what it is like:

starts at 1:45

Truth unfolds in time through a communal process.

by marco on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 05:38:02 PM EST
there is another video of three young guys who waterboard one of themselves on a "dare".  it may offend you with the flippant carelessness of the three guys making it.  i apologize in advance if it is not appropriate to post here; i won't embed the video, but will only provide a link below.  but i believe it vividly illustrates two significant points which may be obscured by watching the video above:

  1.  the journalist in the previous video, who happens to be a former Navy SEAL and therefore had undergone torture "innoculation" training (including exposure to waterboarding) is resisting the waterboarding with remarkable endurance.  an "untrained" civilian reacts quite differently.

  2.  even though there may be no physical damage or harm done, my feeling is that the guy in this video looks pretty shaken up, despite the extremely brief exposure to the waterboarding and his full knowledge that he was in "safe" hands with his friends (as opposed to complete ignorance in the hands of menacing strangers). the guy's reaction in this video is persuasive that prolonged exposure to waterboarding by professionals could be psychologically traumatic and very damaging (aside from the possible physiological effects such as heart attacks, etc.)

it's clear from the video itself and from the comments on the YouTube site for this video that they were not doing the waterboarding correctly (e.g. the cellophane should have had a hole for breathing through the mouth, the towel is often pre-soaked and/or stuffed in the mouth, etc.), which would imply that thorough, "competent" waterboarding would be far worse.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q7RXTWMiBkg

Truth unfolds in time through a communal process.

by marco on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 06:05:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Adam Curtis

It's a wider thing than the internet, but the internet sums it up. It's that on the surface it says that "the internet is a new form of democracy". So what you're seeing is a new pluralism, a new collage, a new mosaic of all sorts of different ideas that's genuinely representative.

But if you analyse what happens, it simplifies things.

First of all, the people who do blogging, for example, are self-selecting. Quite frankly it's quite clear that what bloggers are is bullies. The internet has removed a lot of constraints on them. You know what they're like: they're deeply emotional, they're bullies, and they often don't get out enough. And they are parasitic upon already existing sources of information - they do little research of their own.
What then happens is this idea of the 'hive mind', instead of leading to a new plurality or a new richness, leads to a growing simplicity.
The bloggers from one side act to try to force mainstream media one way, the others try to force it the other way. So what the mainstream media ends up doing is it nervously tries to steer a course between these polarised extremes.

o you end up with a rigid, simplified view of the world, which is negotiated by mainstream media in response to the bullying extremities.

Far from being "the wisdom of crowds", it's the stupidity of crowds.

Collectively what we are doing is creating a more simplified world.

(...)

What's happening on the internet is that people are retreating into their citadels where they will not have that. And if you try and do it, they don't like it. Because you're joining up the dots in a way that isn't the way they joined up the dots.

What really happens now, is that they're so entrenched in their self-referential groups, anyone who joins up the dots any other way is a bad person.

There's more.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 05:38:30 PM EST
News editors are more terrorized of those in power- or getting sued- or seeing their advert ratings dip- than damned bloggers.

If they're afraid of bloggers, they're in the wrong business.

by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 05:54:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Luckily we have open-minded liberal and tolerant press owners and media establishments to balance out the nasty pushing and shoving from the blogofascistonemesises with their fair and balanced journalistic high standards.

So there isn't anything to worry about.

Actually something like this is good, because it suggests there's a collective 'Uh oh...' coming from inside the trad media.

And not before time.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 06:07:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
they're so entrenched in their self-referential groups

He's absolutely right. And the MSM is the best example of this in action. Or maybe the worst example as it were. Actually one of the blogging world's biggest problems is viewing the world through the mono-lens of the media.

That interview sure is rife with unself-aware narratives.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 06:05:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't think ET is a bunch of bullies overall, but to be fair to Curtis, my experiences with the top echelons of the UK blogosphere pretty much reflect the notion of "bloggers as bullies."

My political bias will show when I suggest that some of the tactics of Michelle Malkin in the US blogosphere fit quite well into that category too...

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 06:09:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Mind you I don't know why I'm defending him, he seems to be dedicated to a cartoon depiction of the blogosphere.

Not to mention eliding many facts about the fundamental history of the MSM. And of course, in the end, although he makes thought-provoking films, his last one didn't bring much to the discussion that we at ET had not already outlined...

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 06:17:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
OTOH, he does say some important things about the artistic stagnation on the web. There's very little money been put into alternative narrative art that hyperlinks and multimedia enable. Not really sure why that is...

Hmmm....

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 06:31:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Of course, the uselessness of Adam Curtis is that at the beginning he rails against bloggers for being negative, for having no vision of a future world, no positive thing to guide their ranting...

and then he ends by saying:

People look at the world and make their own minds up. Yes, it's a limited world we're living in and that's why it's called The Trap. My job is not to try and change the world but describe it.

Not as some of our journalists do, to fantasise about it.

So he's just a blogger who puts his blogs out on TV then?

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 06:37:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Because:

  1. You can't sell it. And there's so much of it you can't charge for access to it.

  2. It's not usually any more interesting than non-linky art.

  3. There's no serious interest from the mainstream art scene, which is just about getting to grips with video and might start taking the web seriously in a decade or two.

Screen resolution remains an issue. As and when immersive environments appear, I expect art to get a lot more interesting.

In fact one of the more fun things about Second Life - possibly the only fun thing about Second Life - is that there's some fairly inventive virtual art there. Gravity and the usual rules don't apply unless you want them to, so it's possible to assemble sculptures and environments that do impossible things.

SL ruins it all with endless SELL SELL SELL. But with a different ethic and more up to date rendering, the same technology could start to push some limits.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 06:55:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yeah, I know, profit ratios and all that...

But there's fascinating possibilities, at least in narrative fiction, (which ironically those "reality" shows touch on) about presenting a story from multiple points of view through multiple media.

I worked on a concept for a TV show, that had every character keep a diary on a website - easily done with blogs now, and even separately filmed, low-res "memories" embedded into the blog posts, which sounds a lot like youtube embedding.

Now the problem is that in terms of writing and filming resources, it's 2 times as intensive as a normal TV show. And, like anything else, to make it work needs real writing talent.

But the ability to make an interesting connection with the audience is huge, because you can play with narrative omniscience etc.

And of course, it could all ask questions about the tabloid "he said, she said" "kiss and tell" dramas that run in this very way...

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 04:40:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Oops, my point was, there were lots of interesting concepts bouncing around some 10 years ago that technology has now caught up with... but it seems profit ratios don't allow for much action...
by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 04:43:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
This is usual generalization, bloggers are different and ET is good example of this. Mainstream media so far did not show signs of changing editorial policies because of blogging and is far cry from Middle Way as the author would have us to believe.

Parasitic? Who is not parasitic in this world? When I write about militant infested regions of Pakistan how many people can boast knowledge of the ground realities and make their judgements? Blogging is just another form of chatting and chattering classes need not participate in revolutions, invasions, spying in Afghanistan, Pakistan badlands to talk about them. One may talk to people who visited these areas, so-called eye-witnesses, as I did but many times it's not possible.

The same charge applies to most articles in media as not many MSM nowadays can boast of presence of correspondents in different parts of the world, and majority of correspondents do not participate in any events, just monitoring situations.
This charge applies first to Western media which likes to chide everybody from Putin to Chavez, without precise knowledge of ground realities.

by FarEasterner on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 01:51:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
La Repubblica unloaded a major scandal this morning. Everyone's outraged and journalists are menacing a strike. But wait a minute, get real. Journalists on strike? After years of petty groveling, they've discovered that they've got a profession?

Well, here's the scandal: During an investigation into Luigi Crispi's ("I couldn't have committed the crime: I'm a Buddhist!") poll and Marketing company investigators uncovered extensive and routine news-fixing between the State TV and the Berlusconi Mediaset. For years the two giants colluded to glorify Berlusconi, hide his numerous false steps and create ad hoc media events to keep his adversaries out of the limelight. As if any acute observer of Italian affairs wasn't perfectly aware of it.

So, now we got the proof. Hundred of calls between the major (rival!) news brokers with the sole intent to glorify Silvio during prime time. The pope's dead? Stall the breaking news until Silvio finishes his monologue! The President of the Republic is going to deliver an important speech? Get Silvio to do something splashy to distract attention! Tell that anchorman to say "Berlusconi" more often when on the air! Berlusconi lost the elections? Downplay it, use bad lighting for the winners!

Reminds me of that passage in Estienne de La Boetie's Discourse on Voluntary Servitude.

[...]but the dictator sees men about him wooing and begging his favor, and doing much more than he tells them to do. Such men must not only obey orders; they must anticipate his wishes; to satisfy him they must foresee his desires; they must wear themselves out, torment themselves, kill themselves with work in his interest, and accept his pleasure as their own, neglecting their preferences for his, distorting their character and corrupting their nature; they must pay heed to his words, to his intonation, to his gestures, and to his glance. Let them have no eye, nor foot, nor hand that is not alert to respond to his wishes or to seek out his thoughts.
by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 05:44:27 PM EST
A 4 for quoting La Boetie's Discourse on Voluntary Servitude, certainly the all-time greatest text about political philosophy.

"Dieu se rit des hommes qui se plaignent des conséquences alors qu'ils en chérissent les causes" Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet
by Melanchthon on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 06:17:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's a great discourse. acute, modern (or maybe things have never changed.)

Curiously, for a long time it was only on the net in Italian, on the BNF Gallica site of all places. (They now have French editions.) The discourse was translated into Italian during the Jacobin Republic of Naples in 1799 by one of the leaders of the revolt against the Borbons, Cesare Paribelli.

by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 06:54:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A 4 to you for highlighting it.

Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.
by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 07:28:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A great link, thanks!

Estienne De La Boetie: Discourse on Voluntary Servitude (1548)

in the light of reason, it is a great misfortune to be at the beck and call of one master, for it is impossible to be sure that he is going to be kind, since it is always in his power to be cruel whenever he pleases. As for having several masters, according to the number one has, it amounts to being that many times unfortunate. Although I do not wish at this time to discuss this much debated question, namely whether other types of government are preferable to monarchy,[2] still I should like to know, before casting doubt on the place that monarchy should occupy among commonwealths, whether or not it belongs to such a group, since it is hard to believe that there is anything of common wealth in a country where everything belongs to one master. This question, however, can remain for another time and would really require a separate treatment involving by its very nature all sorts of political discussion.


Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.
by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 07:30:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
What a great read.

Estienne De La Boetie: Discourse on Voluntary Servitude (1548)

A weakness characteristic of human kind is that we often have to obey force; we have to make concessions; we ourselves cannot always be the stronger. Therefore, when a nation is constrained by the fortune of war to serve a single clique, as happened when the city of Athens served the thirty Tyrants,[4] one should not be amazed that the nation obeys, but simply be grieved by the situation; or rather, instead of being amazed or saddened, consider patiently the evil and look forward hopefully toward a happier future.


Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.
by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 07:34:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Such fantastic writing!

Estienne De La Boetie: Discourse on Voluntary Servitude (1548)

Our nature is such that the common duties of human relationship occupy a great part of the course of our life. It is reasonable to love virtue, to esteem good deeds, to be grateful for good from whatever source we may receive it, and, often, to give up some of our comfort in order to increase the honor and advantage of some man whom we love and who deserves it. Therefore, if the inhabitants of a country have found some great personage who has shown rare foresight in protecting them in an emergency, rare boldness in defending them, rare solicitude in governing them, and if, from that point on, they contract the habit of obeying him and depending on him to such an extent that they grant him certain prerogatives, I fear that such a procedure is not prudent, inasmuch as they remove him from a position in which he was doing good and advance him to a dignity in which he may do evil. Certainly while he continues to manifest good will one need fear no harm from a man who seems to be generally well disposed.

Estienne De La Boetie: Discourse on Voluntary Servitude (1548)

Discourse on Voluntary Servitude
The Discours sur la servitude volontaire
of

ÉTIENNE DE LA BOÉTIE,
1548
Rendered into English by
HARRY KURZ

[Published under the title
ANTI-DICTATOR]

New York: COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PRESS: 1942.



Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.
by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 07:36:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Diary!

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 05:18:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
About La Boetie or the Italian news fixing scandal?
by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 07:50:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
But the Italian news first, I think.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2007 at 10:35:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Ok, Have a Happy Holiday, all my American friends.  

The rest of you - enjoy those transit strikes and workdays.

Now you know what it feels like to be us. ;)

"Pretending that you already know the answer when you don't is not actually very helpful." ~Migeru.

by poemless on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 06:26:21 PM EST
from rememberinggiap



Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.

by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 07:58:59 PM EST
A house build of empty bottles, in Lithuania:


by das monde on Wed Nov 21st, 2007 at 10:29:21 PM EST


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