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European Salon de News, Discussion et Klatsch – 13 November

by Fran Mon Nov 12th, 2007 at 11:57:20 PM EST

On this date in history:

1994 - Voters in Sweden decide to join the European Union in a referendum.

More here and here


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EUROPE
by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Nov 12th, 2007 at 11:58:06 PM EST
Europe pledges to lead on energy conservation - International Herald Tribune

ROME: The world's energy lust is incompatible with the need to avert climate change, the European Commission president, José Manuel Barroso, said Monday in the keynote address of the 20th World Energy Congress here.

How to "manage this energy environment and mitigate the worst effects of climate change" is "the greatest challenge of our generation," Barroso said, adding that Europe would lead the way toward conservation and the efficient use of energy.

The World Energy Congress, the biggest industry gathering on the topic, has met every five years since 1924, bringing together world leaders and corporate executives.

But the meeting this year has a special sense of urgency: It is the first since a United Nations report this year concluded that fossil fuel use was driving climate change, with potentially disastrous economic and social effects. Oil prices, which were the equivalent of $1.43 a barrel when the World Energy Council first met, are now are hovering below $100.

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 12:01:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]
So José, will you advocate government action and regulation, or continue to trust the market to deliver, with some public money injections?

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 03:35:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
EU rescue bid for Galileo faces difficulties - EUobserver.com
EUOBSERVER / BRUSSELS - The 27-nation EU is entering the final phase of talks on how to finance the bloc's troubled satellite navigation system, Galileo, but member states remain split, while the European Parliament has flexed its muscles on the issue.

On Tuesday (13 November), EU finance ministers are expected to discuss a European Commission proposal to use the 2007 and 2008 budgetary margins for agriculture and administration - running to around €2.5 billion - to get the project on its feet.

But a deal remains difficult due to strong opposition in a number of EU capitals, mainly in Berlin and London.

Germany, the largest net contributor to EU coffers, has resisted the idea of funding Galileo exclusively from the bloc's common budget.

This is thought to be because Berlin is concerned that it will then miss out getting unspent farm money returned to it.
by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 12:02:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Germany is being a petty money counter here. I mean, squabbling about getting 500 million euros back where a major European project is at stake...

That the UK wants Europe to fail is no surprise, but Germany?

Any way to put pressure on them?

by nanne (zwaerdenmaecker@gmail.com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 04:21:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Invite Merkel to your ranch?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 04:23:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Hail, that dawg don't hunt!

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 06:22:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Reding to take on telecom firms through new EU body - EUobserver.com
EU telecoms commissioner Viviane Reding will on Tuesday (13 November) propose an EU regulatory authority for the bloc's heavily fragmented mobile phone and internet markets, a move likely to stir controversy among big operators in the sector.

The commissioner in media interviews over the weekend called for a new Brussels-based authority overseeing the 27 EU states' national telecom regulators.

The newly created body would have the power to propose the splitting up of big companies' network infrastructure and their customer services, as a radical measure to force telecom giants such as France Telecom to open their networks to smaller competitors.

"I want to revolutionise the European telecom market. And that's why we need a European supervisory authority", Ms Reding told weekly Der Spiegel in comments quoted by German papers.

The 27 national regulatory authorities, which would continue to exist under the plans, would through the new EU body get new tools "for example through the possibility of functionally separating the running of a network and [the offering of] services of a dominant provider," the commissioner said.
by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 12:02:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
EU terror list criticised by human rights watchdog - EUobserver.com
The European Union's anti-terror list violates basic human rights, a Swiss investigator working for the human rights body the Council of Europe has said.

"The present system of blacklists flouts the fundamental principles which are the basis of human rights," notes the report by Dick Marty, according to Reuters.

To be formally presented today (12 November), the report condemns the terror black lists of both the EU and the United Nations claiming that suspects on the list are not allowed the right of reply and also have difficulty clearing their names once on the list.

This is not the first bad publicity for the EU list, which contains around 60 entries of groups and individuals and is reviewed around twice a year by member state secret service representatives.

In December, an EU court questioned the 2002 decision to place the People's Mujahadeen Organization of Iran (PMOI), a Paris-based Iranian opposition group, on the terror register and freeze its assets.
by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 12:03:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]
is a Senator and the human rights rapporteur of the Council of Europe, not just a PI...

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 03:50:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yeah, but cut them some slack, this is EUObserver.com and how would they know about Europe?
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 07:44:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
EU Calls for Increased Energy Competition in Germany | Europe | Deutsche Welle | 12.11.2007
EU officials want to increase competition in the German energy sector by separating energy production and distribution activities, amid sharply rising prices that have sparked widespread debate in Germany.

The discussion in Brussels has led some in the German energy sector to call the European Union's executive commission a bigger threat to EU energy companies than Russia.

 

"You are always talking about Russia but the real threat is coming from the European Commission," the chief executive of German energy giant EON Wulf Bernotat told the Financial Times on Monday, Nov. 12.

 

Many in Europe have rung alarms over what they see as Russian intentions to dominate the European energy sector through investments by groups such as the state-controlled gas monopoly Gazprom.

 

Bernotat added, however, that he did not think commission plans to increase competition by breaking up big power groups through a process called unbundling would succeed because they were opposed by major EU members.

 

"I am pretty sure unbundling is not coming," he said. "Such processes in Brussels take time especially if important member states such as France and Germany are against it."

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 12:04:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]

"You are always talking about Russia but the real threat is coming from the European Commission," the chief executive of German energy giant EON Wulf Bernotat told the Financial Times on Monday, Nov. 12.

Priceless.


In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 03:23:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I almost fell from the chair, too... A grain of truth embedded in a howling hypocrisy from E.On.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 03:38:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
"I am pretty sure unbundling is not coming," he said.

And he may be right. Unbundling will come to the railway sector before it comes to the energy sector: energy companies are more powerful and seen as more strategic.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 03:40:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The quote Jerome highlights is entertaining, but bias follows on its heels - and also forms the last argument, always a good indicator of the preferred view of the truth.

EU Calls for Increased Energy Competition in Germany | Europe | Deutsche Welle | 12.11.2007

Hesse minister joins calls for more competition

Meanwhile, the German state of Hesse's Minister for Economic Affairs Alois Rhiel called for Germany's Federal Cartel Office to have more power and to increase energy competition in Germany.

snip snip

But opening up the market to competition, energy prices in Germany could be reduced to by 10 percent to 15 percent, a target that the Hesse minister said he was pursuing in his own state.

Followed by similar arguments from Kroes.

"I am pretty sure unbundling is not coming," he said. "Such processes in Brussels take time especially if important member states such as France and Germany are against it."

Is this just wishful thinking or realistic in the current state of affairs?

by Nomad on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 03:49:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
will not happen, but what's in place already is pretty close to that in practice.

The lack of access for outsiders to the networks is a structural technical problem for electricity. It's not just like a highway network where you oepn the doors to all comers - there's a permanent need to balance inputs and outputs at all times, and that requires the network being able to order producers around. Having direct coordination between the network and the main producers remains the simplest option.

But economists and financiers know better than engineers, right...

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 03:55:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
send them a viewpoint from the Cato institute...?

From the point of "smart" electric grids, isn't direct coordination of the networks the best possible way forward?

by Nomad on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 04:34:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It's the financial structure that matters. Being able to deliver electricity is an expendable sub-benefit.
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 05:08:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
France, Germany Agree That Iran Must Stay Nuke-Free | Europe | Deutsche Welle | 12.11.2007
In the wake of talks in Berlin, the leaders of France and Germany said they agreed on the need for diplomacy in dealing with Tehran, and pledged to do their utmost to keep nuclear weapons out of Iranian hands.

French President Nicolas Sarkozy said Monday, Nov. 12, that Germany and France agree that Iran must not acquire a nuclear weapon, after talks with German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

 

"We are on the same wavelength: no nuclear weapons for Iran," Sarkozy told the AFP news service. "Germany and France believe in the usefulness of sanctions."

 

Merkel said the two countries agreed that a new round of UN sanctions may be necessary to stop Iran from pursuing uranium enrichment.

 

"The common position that, if Iran does not change its stance, further sanctions must be considered in the UN framework," she told reporters after the meeting.

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 12:05:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
White House frustrated with Brown over Iran - Telegraph

The Bush administration is losing patience with Gordon Brown over Iran, with senior American diplomats frustrated by his reluctance to declare bluntly that the Islamic state must never be allowed nuclear weapons.

  • Interpol name Iranian officials over Jewish community centre bombing
  • Allies of Condoleezza Rice, the US Secretary of State, have told The Sunday Telegraph that the Prime Minister should emulate France's President Nicolas Sarkozy and warn that Iran may face military action, in order to help avert a new war in the Middle East.

     
    Gordon Brown will not be drawn over Iran

    The concerns reflect growing irritation in Washington, from the White House down, that Mr Brown will not match his more robust private conversations on Iran with hard-hitting public statements that would put pressure on the Teheran regime.

    Ms Rice's inner circle argue that unless Iran believes that its defiance of the international community will lead to serious economic and military consequences, there is little hope of diplomacy succeeding. They regard Britain as a key to that effort.

    A senior State Department official with close ties to Ms Rice said: "It would be helpful if he took a tougher line in public. We've got to convince Iran that the West will not tolerate them developing nuclear weapons.

    by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 12:06:21 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Gordon Brown threatens Iran's oil interests unless it curbs nuclear ambition - Times Online

    Gordon Brown last night proposed a worldwide ban on companies developing Iran's oil and gas fields if it failed to curb its nuclear ambitions.

    He promised to take the lead in seeking tougher penalties through the United Nations and the European Union as Britain and the United States seek to increase the pressure on Tehran.

    In his first major speech on foreign policy the Prime Minister said that Iran had a choice -- confrontation with the international community and stringent sanctions against it; or dropping its nuclear plans, ending support for terrorism and having a transformed relationship with the world.

    Unless imminent reports from the EU and the International Atomic Energy Agency suggested movement from Iran, there would be stronger sanctions, including on oil and gas investment and the financial sector. "Iran should be in no doubt about our seriousness of purpose," he said.

    [Murdoch Alert]
    by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 12:16:47 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Brown signals foreign policy shift towards EU - Independent Online Edition > UK Politics

    Tougher sanctions on Iran's oil and gas fields were proposed by Gordon Brown as part of international efforts to persuade Tehran to abandon its alleged attempts to acquire a nuclear bomb.

    Energy companies would be banned from exploiting reserves for use by Iran if the sanctions outlined by the Prime Minister in a wide-ranging foreign affairs speech last night are endorsed by the EU or the UN. Those measures could be coupled with tougher economic sanctions by international banks if a report due shortly from the International Atomic Energy Authority (IAEA) shows that President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's regime continues to defy the international community over the nuclear non-proliferation treaty.

    Mapping out his strategy of "hard-headed internationalism" for Britain's future foreign policy, Mr Brown marked a shift from Tony Blair's readiness to act as foremost ally of the US and favoured confidant of President George W Bush. He signalled that in future Britain would work more closely with EU partners and through the UN. Mr Brown made it clear that Britain believes tougher sanctions - rather than the threats of military action - against Iran are starting to work, although his senior officials insisted that "nothing is ruled out".

    Speaking at the Lord Mayor's Banquet in white tie and tails - an outfit he refused to wear when he was Chancellor - the Prime Minister also called for a standby civilian force including members of the police and judiciary to be created to deal with international crises such as Rwanda and Darfur.

    by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 12:07:19 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Transport and utility strikes pose biggest threat to Sarkozy | Special reports | Guardian Unlimited
    France's president, Nicolas Sarkozy, will tonight confront the biggest challenge yet to his six-month tenure, when transport and utility workers begin open-ended strike action which could paralyse the country, deepening the sense of a "November of discontent".

    Unions and the left yesterday accused Sarkozy of deliberately forcing workers onto the streets for a showdown over pensions reform in order to portray himself as a hard-man reformer who is prepared to stand his ground.

    From 8pm tonight, transport, gas and electricity workers, and staff at the Paris Opera and Comédie Française, will down tools in protest at plans to end special pension benefits enjoyed by certain public sector workers. Ending these special deals is key for Sarkozy if he is to retain his image as a tough reformer and push through more difficult changes in labour law and general pensions early next year.

    The special deals - which date back to the end of the second world war or, in some cases, to the time of Louis XIV - allow certain workers, such as train drivers, to retire early on favourable packages because their jobs were historically seen as dangerous or strenuous.

    by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 12:08:30 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    M of A - Strikes

    It is good to see that strikes are back in fashion. They are the best, and often the only way, people can demand their fair share of the productivity they bring to the market.

    In Hollywood the Writers Guild of America is on strike to get a fair share of the revenue stream that will come through Internet distribution of their work.

    In New York the stage workers are trying to protect their hard-won benefits by shutting down shows.

    Huge railway and student strikes are planned this week in France to fight against Sarkozy's neo-liberal attack on pensions and on University financing.

    In Germany locomotive drivers and train conductors are in on and off strikes to get better payment.

    In Ireland bus drivers are on strike over new imposed working condictions that in effect require them to do longer hours.

    by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 12:08:59 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    The locomotive drivers in Hungary will stroke again, this time for 4 or 6 hours, too. But whether they achieve anything, we'll see...

    I learnt from (the same) internal source that the insane plans of cuts to the new regular interval timeplan are off the table, though not permanently: the issue should be back on the table after impact studies (read: the prior plans of the transport ministry weren't based on any studies whatsoever). However, regarding branchline closures, after the first strike, the ministry increased the number of lines in discussion from 28 to 37... Currently, local governments let themselves be blackmailed into financing ten of these, the game continues with the rest, disregarding the strikes so far.

    *Lunatic*, n.
    One whose delusions are out of fashion.

    by DoDo on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 03:50:29 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    that there would essentially be no public transport from tonight until the end of the week. I'm not sure yet what I'll do - work at home, walk or just take some days off.

    In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
    by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 03:52:24 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Strikes for more bikes?

    Our knowledge has surpassed our wisdom. -Charu Saxena.
    by metavision on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 12:23:33 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Bosnia PM resignation accepted, parties talk | WORLD | NEWS | tvnz.co.nz

    Bosnia's three-man presidency accepted the resignation of Prime Minister Nikola Spiric, signalling the start of difficult talks on a new cabinet and possible early elections in the divided country.
       
    Spiric will remain caretaker PM while the country's three rival ethnic groups - Bosnian Serbs, Croats and Muslims - try to find a compromise candidate for prime minister.

    If they cannot agree, the country must hold a general election.
       
    Haris Silajdzic, the presidency's Muslim member, told reporters the presidency had tried to dissuade Spiric, but in the end had to accept his resignation.
       
    "We are launching consultations with parties for a new cabinet," Silajdzic said. "We have 30 days to propose a new prime minister-designate."

    by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 12:09:52 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    EU rejects US class action model  -  Business Day - News Worth Knowing

    LISBON -- The European Union's (EU's) consumer chief dispelled industry fears on Saturday that she intends to introduce US-style class action lawsuits across the bloc next year as part of her strategy to strengthen consumer rights.

    EU Consumer Protection Commissioner Meglena Kuneva announced in March that she hoped to introduce a new system of "collective redress" aimed at giving European consumers more power to bring claims against providers of faulty goods or services.

    But she vehemently dismissed claims that she proposed to copy the US legal system, where class action laws have allowed lawyers to create a thriving litigation industry seeking colossal damages against companies.

    "To those who have come all the way to Lisbon to hear the words `class action', let me be clear from the start. There will not be any. Not in Europe, not under my watch," Kuneva told a meeting of business leaders, consumer groups and leading law firms in the Portuguese capital.

    by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 12:11:16 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    because that's the main priority, as usual, right? 'Dispel industry fears'

    In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
    by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 03:56:56 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    It would be quite difficult for the EU to allow or disallow class action lawsuits, I think. It's a matter of the private law of Member States.
    by nanne (zwaerdenmaecker@gmail.com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 04:24:48 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    http://www.beppegrillo.it/english.php

    Assassins (of masses) in the workplace

    In 2006 there were 1302 deaths in the workplace, 930 thousand injuries, about 27 thousand people made invalids. A social cost of 41 billion euro each year 5/6 little budgets.
    The number will easily be well above that for 2007. Just on 5 November there were 5 people killed at work. Their names are: Immacolata, Alan, Francesco, Cristiano and Paul.
    It's a war that the newspapers don't talk about, that the politicians either use or ignore.
    We need to ask ourselves why a man or a woman decides to work while putting their lives at risk. They are never casual deaths. Those who die know they are facing danger. They decide to do it because they have children, to pay the mortgage on their home, or simply to survive. They do it because they have no rights, clandestine or precarious with a resignation letter already signed, so, if they raise their voice, they have sacked themselves.
    There are more dead in Italy in a year than there are United States soldiers dying in the war in Iraq.

    snip

    Who gains? Because it's certain that someone gains.
    Today, tomorrow, for the whole week the media will saturate our brains with football violence. If someone has made a mistake, they must pay. But for those who die in the workplace, no one investigates; no one gives the job to the police. No front page. Football is a tool for mass distraction. You don't have to think.

    g'morning fran!

    'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

    by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 02:30:44 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    I think Beppe's site is a must for getting information on little known abuses in Italy. But he tends to be too polemic and oversimplifies at times.

    Death and injury are major problems on work and construction sites but it must be coupled with the larger context of the job black market and generalized evasion.

    As for it being reported it often gets headline coverage and has been a public concern of president Napolitano.

    Security laws do exist, following EU directives I suppose, but the illegal, clandestine economy is so vast whatever repression there is is a drop in the bucket.

    PS. It's always a pleasure to see some prominent racist (Lega Nord) arrested for running illegal immigrant rackets. By making harsh, segregational laws against immigrants you create a thriving illegal work pool of dirt cheap labour without rights.

    by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 04:15:06 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    It seems it really is to spend more time with his family.
       
       
    Reuters: Müntefering tritt als Minister und Vizekanzler zurückReuters: Müntefering resigns as Minister and Vice-Chancellor
    Vizekanzler und Arbeitsminister Franz Müntefering tritt zurück. Das bestätigte sein Sprecher Stefan Giffeler am Dienstag in Berlin.

    "Franz Müntefering wird seine Funktionen als Arbeitsminister und Vizekanzler aus ausschließlich familiären Gründen niederlegen." Er betonte damit, dass der Rückzug nicht aus politischen Gründen erfolge. Es ist bekannt, dass Münteferings Frau schwer krebskrank ist. Müntefering galt als Garant der Regierungsfähigkeit und Koalitionstreue der SPD im Bündnis mit der Union. Über eine Nachfolge im Ministerium und der SPD-Führungsrolle als Vizekanzler gab es zunächst keine Informationen.

    Müntefering will nach Angaben seines Sprechers am Nachmittag die SPD-Fraktion über seine Entscheidung informieren. Offenbar hatte er damit noch die Beratungen der Koalitionsrunde am Montag abend abgewartet. Er hatte an dem vorangegangenen Spitzentreffen vor einer Woche wegen der Krankheit seiner Frau nicht teilgenommen und auch die vergangene Woche weitgehend in Bonn verbracht, wo sie in einer Klinik operiert worden war. Müntefering hat in einem früheren Interview bestätigt, dass er beim ersten schweren Ausbruch der Krankheit 2002 einen Rücktritt erwogen habe.

    Vice-Chancellor and Minister for Employment Franz Müntefering resigns. His Speaker Stefan Giffeler confirmed this on Tuesday in Berlin

    "Franz Müntefering will lay down his function as Minister for Employment and Vice-Chancellor, due exclusively to family reasons." With this, he emphasised that the resignation was not caused by political reasons. It is known that Müntefering's wife is suffering from a bad case of cancer. Müntefering was held to be the guarantor of the SPD's ability to govern and faithfulness in the coalition with the CDU/CSU. For the time being, there was no information about the succession in the ministry and the SPD leadership role as Vice-Chancellor.

    According to his speaker, Müntefering wants to inform the SPD faction of his decision in the afternoon. Apparently he had waited for the consultations in the coaltion round on monday evening. He had not attended the preceding meeting of the coaltion leaders in the week before due to the illness of his wife, and also spent much of last week in Bonn, where she was operated  in a clinic. In an earlier interview, Müntefering confirmed that he had already considered resigning in 2002, at the first severe onset of the disease.

    by nanne (zwaerdenmaecker@gmail.com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 06:21:11 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Merkel Loses 'Mr. Grand Coalition'

    "If you know your enemies and know yourself, you will not be imperiled in a hundred battles." Sun Tzu
    by Turambar (sersguenda at hotmail com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 02:38:35 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    RIA Novosti - Russia - Military chief says Russia not obliged to protect world from U.S.
    Answering a question as to whether or not the world could count on Russia to defend it from "insidious American plans," Baluyevsky replied, "Today, there is no need to be afraid of the Russian Armed Forces.

    However, I do not believe that the Russian military is obliged to defend the world from the evil Americans".



    The struggle of man against tyranny is the struggle of memory against forgetting.(Kundera)
    by Elco B (elcob at scarlet dot be) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 09:01:26 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    In deadpan you have dead.

    In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
    by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 10:24:23 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    WORLD
    by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Nov 12th, 2007 at 11:58:25 PM EST
    U.S. Digs In to Guard Iraq Oil Exports - WSJ.com

    KHAWR AL AMAYA OIL TERMINAL, Iraq -- The U.S. Navy is building a military installation atop this petroleum-export platform as the U.S. establishes a more lasting military mission in the oil-rich north Persian Gulf.

    While presidential candidates debate whether to start bringing ground troops home from Iraq, the new construction suggests that one footprint of U.S. military power in Iraq isn't shrinking anytime soon: American officials are girding for an open-ended commitment to protect the country's oil industry.

    That is a sea change for the U.S., which has patrolled these waters for decades. In the past, American warships and their allies flexed the West's military might in the Persian Gulf to demonstrate a broad commitment to protect the region, which produces almost a third of the world's oil. President Jimmy Carter codified the doctrine in 1980 in response to a perceived Soviet threat.

    Now, amid rising prices -- oil futures finished Friday at $96.32 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange, up 86 cents -- and new vulnerabilities in the world's stretched oil-supply chain -- from militants in Nigeria to occasional Iranian threats to disrupt Persian Gulf shipping -- the Navy finds itself with an additional, much more specific role: playing security guard to Iraq's offshore oil infrastructure.

    by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 12:00:42 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Interview with PKK Leader Murat Karayilan: 'Turkey Has Left Kurdistan to the Generals' - International - SPIEGEL ONLINE - News

    The Kurdish radicals of the PKK insist they are fighting for a homeland. Turkey and the rest of the world see them as terrorists that need to be eradicated. SPIEGEL spoke with PKK leader Murat Karayilan about the ongoing struggle for a homeland.

     A member of the PKK in the mountains near the Turkish border. It is a standoff that has been escalating for weeks (more...). Kurdish fighters with the Kurdistan Worker's Party (PKK) have, this autumn, staged an increasing number of brazen cross-border attacks into south-eastern Turkey from their bases in the mountains of northern Iraq. The Turks have been lobbing artillery at PKK bases and have threatened a cross-border incursion of their own.

    The West has urged calm. But Ankara is under growing domestic pressure to take action. Besides, as the Turkish leadership has pointed out, both the US and the European Union have identified the PKK as a terrorist group -- a product of numerous suicide attacks carried out by the PKK with civilians as their targets.

    SPIEGEL caught up with PKK head Murat Karayilan in the Sagros Mountains in northern Iraq:

    by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 12:06:52 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    That second paragraph gave me a very strong feeling the USG is behind the PKK.  First suspect is Condi State because she has tried to appease... denied everything more than three times.  As the rooster  sings.

    -They arm and negotiate with any faction, anywhere, even if it is counterproductive.
    -Iraq's oil law is still up in the air.
    -Arms must be sold, regardless.
    -Partition is not off the table and a greater Kurdistan is a possibility.

    Our knowledge has surpassed our wisdom. -Charu Saxena.

    by metavision on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 12:53:32 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Asia Times Online :: Middle East News, Iraq, Iran current affairs
    A new report on "smart power" by the Washington think-tank, Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), is out and prodigiously marketed as a timely "liberalist" antidote to the neo-conservative train wreck of US foreign policy that has put the US on the hate list of so many people around the world.

    Titled "A smarter, more secure America," [1] the report is prepared by a high-level group led by Joseph Nye, a leading advocate of the "soft power approach", and a former deputy secretary of state, Richard Armitage, better known for his previous role in the warmongering Project For the New American Century that prodded the US government to attack Iraq and to prevent any challenges to the US's post-Cold War "unipolar moment".

    But, that was then and now Armitage, acting as a consultant to multinational corporations, would rather wear the "neo-liberal" hat pushing for "norm-based internationalism", "global collective goods" and the like, without, however, altogether shedding the hegemonist predilections of his past.

    Not surprisingly, the report's prescription of a bold new approach for US foreign policy is somewhat checkmated by the sheer force of its underlying institutional compromise, devoid of much intellectual vitality, rehashing the old recipes for action associated with the so-called "neo-liberal institutionalism" in international relations while, simultaneously, reconciling two contrasting approaches, namely, militarism and internationalism, by the semantic fiat of "smart power".
    by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 12:14:23 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Joseph E. Stiglitz: The Economic Consequences of Mr. Bush

    The damage done to the American economy does not make front-page headlines every day, but the repercussions will be felt beyond the lifetime of anyone reading this page.



    "If you know your enemies and know yourself, you will not be imperiled in a hundred battles." Sun Tzu
    by Turambar (sersguenda at hotmail com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 05:49:12 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    The Economic Consequences of Mr. Bush by Joseph Stiglitz by An American in London - Nov 7

    In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
    by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 06:34:08 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Thanks.

    "If you know your enemies and know yourself, you will not be imperiled in a hundred battles." Sun Tzu
    by Turambar (sersguenda at hotmail com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 02:22:34 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    There are some indications that Indian government is close to resolving sharp political crisis over nuclear deal with US:
    Left approves Govt-IAEA talk
    The Left offered some relief on the nuclear deal and said the government can start talks with the IAEA, but has retained veto over the final agreement.

    This climbdown by the Left of course caused consternation in the capital and BJP (which retained its opposition to the deal) immediately charged ruling parties with trade-off - n-deal in return for silence on Nandigram.
    Reuters came up with more cautious information:
    Indian nuclear crisis panel to meet
    "I am quite confident that the situation will improve, we'll find some way out," Mukherjee [Indian foreign minister] said.
    ...[But Communists it seems retracted its yesterday statement:]
    "We are opposed to the deal," Communist Party of India chief A.B. Bardhan told reporters. "We do not want the government to operationalise the deal. Our stands remains as before."

    His comments came a day after he told a TV channel that the communists could allow the government to start talks with the International Atomic Energy Agency to secure a safeguards agreement to seal the deal, if it agreed to seek communist approval for the draft before signing it.


    The struggle in Indian elites over the direction of the country's foreign policy seems to be continued for some time more.
    by FarEasterner on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 09:12:37 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    THIS, THAT, AND THE OTHER
    by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Nov 12th, 2007 at 11:58:44 PM EST
    Experiencing Winter at First Paw: Polar Bear Knut Sees His First Snow - International - SPIEGEL ONLINE - News

    Berlin Zoo's celebrity polar bear Knut got the chance to see snow this weekend when the German capital had its first snowfall of the season. He seemed intrigued by the white substance but perfectly at home in the new winter wonderland.

    He spent last winter safe indoors, being raised on a bottle (more...) after his mother rejected him. Now Berlin Zoo's celebrity polar bear Knut has had the chance to enjoy the weather of his natural habitat.

    by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 12:04:11 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    A revolution in teaching promises the solution to dyslexia - Independent Online Edition > Education News

    A ground-breaking project which has had extraordinary success in helping hundreds of dyslexic children and others struggling to read and write at primary school is poised for a major expansion across Britain.

    Springboard for Children, an education charity which now has the enthusiastic backing of the British Dyslexia Association, has achieved a 90 per cent success rate in returning children with severe literacy problems to mainstream classrooms. The revolutionary scheme is being used in a dozen schools in Manchester and London, and the plan is now to set the scheme up in 10 other inner-city areas - bringing a lifeline to around 10,000 children suffering from dyslexia and other difficulties with reading and writing.

    Experts say there would be no shortage of volunteers for the programme, with estimates putting the number of dyslexic pupils in state schools at more than 300,000. In addition, national curriculum tests for 11-year-olds show around 120,000 youngsters a year leave primary school failing to reach the required standard in English. A recent survey by the National Union of Teachers showed the majority of teachers (77 per cent) believe they are not well enough trained to teach dyslexic pupils.

    The secret of the scheme's success is getting immediate help to youngsters once a reading problem is identified in their first term in primary school. Pupils helped by the unit are normally selected by their schools by the end of their first term.

    by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 12:07:39 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    I have never known about dyslexia as amuch as probably I should..at least knowing what it is beleived to eb the main elements of it.

    I am glad they have discovered that it is mainly a lack of  environment input (the main driving source). In this way an educational program will change the life of thousands...

    I am glad society will regard them as "normal".. sad they were cosnidered "anormal" or "udnernormal" for so long.

    A pleasure

    I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

    by kcurie on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 06:54:35 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    BBC NEWS | Americas | Man hurt using gun to change tyre
    A US man has injured himself in both legs after attempting to loosen a stiff wheel-nut by blasting it with his gun.

    The 66-year-old man from Washington state was repairing his car outside his home when the accident took place.

    Shooting at the wheel from arm's length with his 12-gauge shotgun, he was peppered with buckshot and debris.

    The man - whom police say was on his own and not intoxicated - was taken to hospital with severe, but not life-threatening, injuries.

    The man, from South Kitsap, 10 miles (16km) southwest of Seattle, had been repairing his Lincoln Continental for two weeks, according to the police, and had removed all but one of the nuts on the right rear wheel.

    by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 12:09:22 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    just earned himself a nomination for a Darwin Award.

    had removed all but one of the nuts on the right rear wheel.

    Opens a whole new definition on "gun-nut" if you'd ask me.

    by Nomad on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 04:03:26 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    How 'bout NRA's poster boy of the year?  Jackass hasn´t learned anything in 66 years, he won´t learn now.  I hope he saves that Continental for a casket.

    Our knowledge has surpassed our wisdom. -Charu Saxena.
    by metavision on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 01:05:00 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Former pilots and officials call for new U.S. UFO probe | U.S. | Reuters

    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Democratic U.S. presidential hopeful Dennis Kucinich may have been ridiculed for saying he had seen a UFO, but for some former military pilots and other observers, unidentified flying objects are no laughing matter.

    An international panel of two dozen former pilots and government officials called on the U.S. government on Monday to reopen its generation-old UFO investigation as a matter of safety and security given continuing reports about flying discs, glowing spheres and other strange sightings.

    "Especially after the attacks of 9/11, it is no longer satisfactory to ignore radar returns ... which cannot be associated with performances of existing aircraft and helicopters," they said in a statement released at a news conference.

    The panelists from seven countries, including former senior military officers, said they had each seen a UFO or conducted an official investigation into UFO phenomena.

    by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 12:30:10 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    If they're looking for aliens they could start with the White House.
    by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 05:40:26 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    No, sadly, such idiots aren't aliens to humanity, not at all.

    *Lunatic*, n.
    One whose delusions are out of fashion.
    by DoDo on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 05:46:29 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    BBC NEWS: Paddick Lib Dem mayoral hopeful (13 November 2007)
    Former deputy assistant commissioner for the Metropolitan police Brian Paddick has been named as the Liberal Democrat candidate for London mayor.

    ...

    Mr Paddick, who quit the Metropolitan Police earlier this year, beat competition from Chamali Fernando and Fiyaz Mughal for the Lib Dem candidacy.

    He stands in next year's contest against Labour's sitting mayor Ken Livingstone and the Conservatives' Boris Johnson.



    We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo
    by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 02:55:24 AM EST
    [ Parent ]

    Blackstone warns on mortgage `black hole'

    The US mortgage crisis is "deeper" and "scarier" than anyone expected, Tony James, president of Blackstone, said on Monday, as shares in the US private equity group fell on news that its revenues had fallen sharply below expectations in the third quarter.

    Blackstone was hit hard by market turmoil, posting a net loss of $113m (€77m) that reflected both its disappointing revenues and an $802m non-cash charge related to its initial public offering.

    (...)

    Mr James, also Blackstone's chief operating officer, said that deal flow was rebounding but the market for private equity buy-outs would be constrained by the reluctance of big banks to lend during the mortgage crisis.

    "The mortgage black hole is, I think, worse than anyone saw. Deeper, darker, scarier. [The banks] are now looking at new reserves and my sense . . . is they don't have a clear picture of how this will play out and confidence is low."




    In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
    by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 04:12:06 AM EST
    [ Parent ]

    E*Trade Plunges 59% On Analyst Warnings; Bank Unit Goes Awry

    Subprime-mortgage problems crashed into another unexpected corner of the financial industry, as online brokerage firm E*Trade Financial Corp.'s shares fell 59% over concerns about shaky securities on its books.

    E*Trade's main business is online investing, but the company also runs a bank that makes and buys mortgage loans and invests in securities backed by mortgages. Late Friday, the company warned in a filing that problems with these investments would lead to bigger-than-expected losses, prompting a flurry of downgrades from Wall Street analysts.

    (...)

    E*Trade said customer calls spiked yesterday after Citigroup Inc. stock analyst Prashant Bhatia wrote in a report that, given the company's troubles, "customers may withdraw assets, and ask questions later." Mr. Bhatia estimated there is a 15% chance E*Trade will be forced to file for bankruptcy protection. E*Trade also announced Friday that the Securities and Exchange Commission is looking into its mortgage holdings.

    E*Trade reacted angrily to the Citigroup report's implication that it could face a run on the bank. Jarrett Lilien, E*Trade's president and chief operating officer, said the report was tantamount to someone yelling fire in a crowded theater. "The call was irresponsible," he said in an interview. "We are impacted by the recent credit crunch but there is no fire."



    In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
    by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 10:26:37 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    could have told him that (The sky ain´t falling?)

    "deeper" and "scarier"

    black hole is, I think, worse than anyone saw. Deeper, darker, scarier. [The banks] are now looking at new reserves and my sense . . . is they don't have a clear picture of how this will play out and confidence is low."

    Those words were written on ET first.  Let´s sue.

    Our knowledge has surpassed our wisdom. -Charu Saxena.

    by metavision on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 01:23:04 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    KLATSCH
    by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Nov 12th, 2007 at 11:59:03 PM EST
    So Happy Together | Newsweek Politics | Newsweek.com

    Bill Clinton is never at a loss for company. When he's not globe-trotting or charming audiences for as much as $400,000 a speech, he's often schmoozing visitors in his suite of offices in Harlem. Last July, the former president sat down with a billionaire impressed with the William J. Clinton Foundation's campaign against AIDS in Africa. The two men chatted amiably over lunch for more than two hours, and the visitor pledged to write Clinton's foundation a generous check. But there was something unusual, if not plain weird, about the meeting. NEWSWEEK has learned that the billionaire so eager to endear himself to the former president was Richard Mellon Scaife--once the Clintons' archenemy and best-known as the man behind a "vast, right-wing conspiracy" that Hillary Clinton said was out to destroy them.

    Scaife was no run-of-the-mill Clinton hater. In the 1990s, the heir to the Mellon banking fortune contributed millions to efforts to dig up dirt on President Clinton. He backed the Clinton-bashing American Spectator magazine, whose muckrakers produced lurid stories about Clinton's alleged financial improprieties and trysts. Scaife also financed a probe called the Arkansas Project that tried, among other things, to show that Clinton, while Arkansas governor, protected drug runners.

    The Arkansas Project largely came up empty, and most of the stories were ignored by all but the most avid Clinton antagonists. But one Scaife-backed conspiracy theory got widespread attention. In 1993, White House aide and Clinton friend Vince Foster was found dead of a gunshot wound in a park outside Washington, D.C. Three official investigations concluded the death was a suicide. Yet Scaife dollars helped promote assertions that Foster had been murdered--the not-so-subtle subtext being that the Clintons had something to do with it. Scaife hired Christopher Ruddy, a reporter who doggedly pursued the conspiracy theory in a Scaife newspaper, the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. Though discredited, the story resonated with people who believed Clinton was hiding dark secrets. Scaife and Ruddy later started Newsmax, a Web site and magazine that attacks their enemies and lauds their heroes.

    by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 12:02:05 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    While president, Clinton did give Scaife some sort of journalism (or outstanding citizen) award. I thought that cunning on Bill's part at the time.
    by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 04:27:16 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-sente
    ncing12nov12,0,2726445.story?coll=la-home-center

    Panel may cut thousands of prison terms

    The early release of 19,500 inmates could result as officials try to address perceived unfairness in sentencing under federal cocaine laws.
    By Richard B. Schmitt, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
    November 12, 2007
    WASHINGTON -- Under pressure from federal judges, inmate advocacy groups and civil rights organizations, federal authorities are considering a sweeping cut in prison sentences that could bring early release for thousands of federal inmates.

    The proposal being weighed by the U.S. Sentencing Commission would shave an average of at least two years off the sentences of 19,500 federal prisoners, about 1 in 10 in the 200,000-inmate system. More than 2,500 of them, mainly those who have already served lengthy sentences, would be eligible for release within a year if the rule is adopted.
    Such a mass commutation would be unprecedented: No other single rule in the two-decade history of the Sentencing Commission has affected nearly as many inmates. And no single law or act of presidential clemency, such as grants of amnesty to draft resisters and conscientious objectors after World War II and the Vietnam War, has affected so many people at one time.

    The far-reaching move is aimed at addressing what is seen as an unfair disparity in federal cocaine laws dating to the mid-1980s that have imposed much harsher punishment on crack cocaine users and dealers than in powder cocaine cases. About 80% of those sentenced on federal crack charges every year are African American.

    The Justice Department is warning of dire consequences if the proposal goes through, including the possibility that returning thousands of serious drug offenders to the streets would compound a recent increase in violent crime across the country.

    "The unexpected release of 20,000 prisoners . . . would jeopardize community safety and threaten to unravel the success we have achieved in removing violent crack offenders from high-crime neighborhoods," the department said in a letter to the commission this month.

    The congressionally chartered commission, which sets sentencing guidelines for federal judges, has already adopted reduced penalties for new crack cases hitting the courts effective Nov. 1. That decision will affect about 4,000 a cases a year. The debate now is about its plans to make those changes retroactive to inmates. The seven-member commission is considering the proposal at a hearing Tuesday; a vote is expected next year.

    Congress started enacting tougher penalties for crack offenders in the 1980s, at the height of public fears about spreading street violence associated with the drug, and amid concern that crack was more dangerous and addictive than powder cocaine.

    The distinction became embedded in federal law and shaped the guidelines that the Sentencing Commission promulgated for two decades. For example, it takes 100 times as much powder cocaine as crack to trigger mandatory five- and 10-year prison terms under federal law.

    Since the time of shakespeare, it's been "killthe lawyers " --first.

    The myth of the silly suit, the "need" for tort reform--could it be that the trial lawyers are the ones who, for centuries, have spoken truth to power, and get tarred and feathered as a result?
    What are your experiences--personally, not by rumour-- with lawyers?
     

    Capitalism searches out the darkest corners of human potential, and mainlines them.

    by geezer in Paris (risico at wanadoo(flypoop)fr) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 02:15:35 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    well, I hire lots of corporate/finance lawyers. Does that count?

    They work incredibly long hours and cost a lot of money. Usually, they are competent, and friendly.

    In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

    by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 03:41:38 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Surely that counts.
    Interestingly, the (in)justice department's opposition to the release program hinged on what they claimed would be the excessive work load on the Judges. The judges, however, said they were willing to do the work.

    In my case, the lawyers who represented me after my accident came to my house and fixed my garage door so I could get in(these guys weren't sure which end of the screwdriver did the work), loaned me money to eat and get medical treatment, did battle with the hospital vultureaucracy for a reduction in costs ($90 for a piece of vinyl tubing, $26 for a pair of disposable gloves)all without being asked.
    While repairing my garage door, they came across a print of a lovely charcoal- a nude that I had kept for years, but was too big- too costly to frame. They had it beautifully framed- split three ways a cost of about $800- and hung it for me so when I got out of the hospital for the last time,---there it was.
    In general,I like lawyers.

    Capitalism searches out the darkest corners of human potential, and mainlines them.

    by geezer in Paris (risico at wanadoo(flypoop)fr) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 04:40:08 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Reclining nude
    Edgar Degas




    Capitalism searches out the darkest corners of human potential, and mainlines them.

    by geezer in Paris (risico at wanadoo(flypoop)fr) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 04:50:59 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    That's a rare story, geezer and I hope it can be  heard more often.  Unfortunately, I have never had a good experience, plus I suffer from three of them in the family.  Four with my late father, so that's a traumatic childhood in itself.  (;

    Our knowledge has surpassed our wisdom. -Charu Saxena.
    by metavision on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 01:52:29 PM EST
    [ Parent ]

    The Health Cost Myth

    The United States leads the pack in this regard, spending far more on health than other countries. Surely this puts the U.S. at a competitive disadvantage, doesn't it?

    No: It's the other way around. America's high productivity gives us the ability to spend more on health care, especially the latest treatments and technologies, than other developed nations that labor under forms of socialized health care.

    Robert L. Ohsfeldt and John R. Schneider of the American Enterprise Institute have determined that health spending increases at a constant rate of about 8% for every $1,000 increase in GDP per capita. For example, if GDP rises from $30,000 per capita to $31,000, health spending increases by $232. But if GDP per capita rises from $40,000 to $41,000, health spending increases by $500.

    Thus, because Americans earn so much more than people in other countries, it naturally follows that we spend more on health care.

    The fact that more money is wasted is a sign of wealth, not of efficiency. A striking admission in the WSJ pages?


    In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

    by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 06:36:53 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    If it was true, the health indicators should be significantly higher in the US compared to other countries.

    "Dieu se rit des hommes qui se plaignent des conséquences alors qu'ils en chérissent les causes" Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet
    by Melanchthon on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 07:10:53 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    There you go with facts again. The AEI has determined the truth: the facts must be wrong.
    by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 07:11:55 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    There you go with facts again.

    Sorry, I can't help...

    "Dieu se rit des hommes qui se plaignent des conséquences alors qu'ils en chérissent les causes" Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet

    by Melanchthon on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 10:59:27 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    PC Pro: News: Developers tidy up forums with "StupidFilter"
    A team of US software developers is developing a "StupidFilter" that will block unintelligible posts from internet message boards.

    Once the software is installed on a webserver it will scan posts before they are published for nonsense terms including "OMG!!" and "LOL", blocking the worst offenders with a message that says "This comment is more or less unintelligible. Please try to restate it."



    Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
    by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 09:25:36 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Just LOL.

    *Lunatic*, n.
    One whose delusions are out of fashion.
    by DoDo on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 02:16:43 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    This comment is more or less unintelligible. Please try to restate it

    Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
    by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 02:17:43 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    I believe I already solved this problem:
    European Tribune - Of version numbering and convergence
    An Idiotic Acronym Expander is provided. When you see IMHO, afaik, etc. in a page and don't know what it stands for, double click the word, and a span element appears, in green, informing you of its meaning. The span contracts to just the acronym on mouse-out, and expands again on mouse-over. It remains green and mouse-over active after the double click, until you reload the page.
    by someone (s0me1smail(a)gmail(d)com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 02:23:25 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    BBC NEWS | World | Europe | Spain royal sex cartoonists fined
    Two Spanish cartoonists have been found guilty of offending the royal family and fined 3,000 euros (£2,100) each.

    Their cartoon, on the front page of the weekly satirical magazine El Jueves in July, depicted Crown Prince Felipe and his wife Letizia having sex.

    The edition was pulled from newsstands across the country by police.



    Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
    by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 02:18:30 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    ROTFLMAO.

    *Lunatic*, n.
    One whose delusions are out of fashion.
    by DoDo on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 02:20:03 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    This comment is more or less unintelligible. Please try to restate it

    We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo
    by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 02:59:34 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    This will be the end of the Spanish monarchy.

    We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo
    by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 02:24:58 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Nah, they are not about to move to Malta. (´xagerao!)

    Our knowledge has surpassed our wisdom. -Charu Saxena.
    by metavision on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 02:51:19 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    This incident is not going to help the popularity of Felipe. Remember there is a large number of republican Juancarlistas in Spain. Maybe a majority?

    We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo
    by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 02:58:45 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    This was big news in July, when it happened, because it was sooo graphic, but the sentence seems really a minor anecdote around the Santiago summit.  

    Our knowledge has surpassed our wisdom. -Charu Saxena.
    by metavision on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 03:12:08 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Seems to be something going down on the Metro.  Security looks panicked, running up and down the trains.  Hoping no one's managed to set the Pentagon on fire again, since that was just SO fun last week, standing in Arlington Cemetery in the thirty-degree weather.

    Christ, I hate Washington.

    Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

    by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 04:56:07 AM EST
    set the Pentagon on fire again

    That was the French.

    by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2007 at 08:01:28 AM EST
    [ Parent ]


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