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French election + Swedish media

by someone Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 10:26:42 AM EST

As I know that we just can't get enough of the upcoming French presidential elections I thought I'd do a quick rundown on how the campaign so far has been covered in the Swedish media. I found it rather instructive. It seems like the Swedish media has largely completely internalised the inevitability of neoliberal economics. On several occasions the frustrated Swedish journalists note how French politicians seem to fail to grasp how the future is here, it's reform or die, and France should really think of the rest of Europe and get on with it already.

Worth noting for those who think that Social Democracy in the Swedish manner is a good thing: I think, that in Sweden even the Social Democrats have come to terms with the inevitabilities of the market and the neoliberal policies it demands. There is no other option worth talking about, and France is seen as simply backwards. I see this as a strong reason to be very wary of the 'Scandinavian model'. It is not really all that left anymore.

Disclaimer: I give no guarantee that these articles are in fact representational of Swedish coverage of the French presidential elections. I did some searching of major Swedish newspapers, and grabbed some stuff that was interesting, or seemed to be reoccuring. Below are brief summaries of the main points I found.

I think the French elections might offer us a very nice opportunity to do a comparison of media across Europe. A kind of snapshot of the European media landscape, in other words. So, let me encourage others to take a look at how the media of some other nation covers this. Do they all (as I suspect) recycle the same ideas and the same narratives?

From the diaries -- whataboutbob


SVT (Swedish Television):
Styrka blir svaghet för Ségolène Royal Strength becomes weakness for Ségolène Royal
February 4, 2007

Swedish TV has a 2min 52sec clip of Ségo doing an election/listening meeting in Grenoble, as well as an article describing her campaign.

First we get a mention of the 'Ségo-sphere' of youth who are very excited about her campaign and its openness. Then a description of her participative campaigning method and the enthusiasm it inspires in some, but also how it is becoming a weakness in facing off with Sarkozy who already has a programme. Further, her speech at this meeting is described as boring, occasionally uncertain, and uninspiring with only a few occurrences of audience excitement. It is noted that some people leave while she is speaking. Then it is on to her famous gaffes on foreign policy, as well as her trouble with a French comedian. Finely we are told that Sarkozy currently leads, but that the campaign has just begun.

Sydsvenskan, from the opinion pages:
Fransk populism French populism
February 15, 2007

What would one expect to read in an opinion piece in Sydsvenskan, a southern Swedish paper which is clearly on the right of the Swedish political spectrum? Perhaps a rehash of France's weaknesses as already well established by the English language business press? Yes, indeed! France, a land with great troubles. Unlike Britain it is protectionist in a globalising world. Weak growth and terrible unemployment numbers. Remember those violent riots in the suburbs in 2005? A clear sign of a stagnant economy and failed integration policies! The country is still relevant because its influence in Europe, where it totally screwed up the constitution for everyone else. Further it is noted that necessary economic reforms are not good election politics, with Le Pen indicated as causing trouble as a populist alternative. Sarkozy is seen as a bit better than Royal for breaking with the present crippling attachment to the welfare state, but he is still too protectionist. Ends with Royal's poor polling numbers, and the failure of the release of her program to boost the numbers.

Expressen: (Swedish tabloid)
061118: Ett bättre Frankrike A better France
Leading article, November 18, 2006

Notes that Ségolène Royal has become the Socialist candidate for president. Then moves on to ask if she will dare to implement the necessary reforms in France. Things have been going poorly for France for a long time. The country has enormous deficits, terrible unemployment and growth is much too low. French politicians have failed to open up the country, rampant protectionism, and resistance to globalisation. CPE is described as a modest proposal to improve the situation for youths, and Villepin is pointed to as a coward for backing down in the face of violent protests. A bit more on over protected labour market in France which keeps youth and immigrants out of the job market. "France has in other words the same problems as Sweden, but ten times worse." Ends with concluding that the rule of Chirac is thankfully soon over, and now the country is ripe for a large dose of economic liberalisation. "But in France liberalism is a bad word." Sarko is seen as a good neoliberal, but as bad on restrictive immigration. Ségo's program was not in existance, but it is noted that she admires Blair, who has continued along the path of Thatcher, who is credited with bringing Britain out of a deadlock much like the present French one.

Expressen:
070116: Franska fegisar French Cowards
Leading Article, January 16, 2007

Another leading article trying to find the most economically liberal candidate in the French elections. "France is the sick man of Europe and needs serious reforms to stand in the new world. None of the French presidential candidates are convincing, they don't have the courage to tell the French voters the truth. [...] This does not bode well, for France or for Europe."

Svenska Dagbladet:
En bra och en dålig väg för Europa One good and one bad way for Europe
Opinion piece, February 13, 2007

Continental Europe is in trouble. Poor economic performance in Germany, France and Italy. Worse unemployment than in the US, UK or Ireland. Continental Europe must reform! Bring in Phelps, please. Yup, here we go! Phelps piece on 'dynamism' is referenced. Problem of Europe: Too low rate of innovation. The state has its fingers in the market too much in Europe. The culture is to blame. Now, compare to proposals by Ségolène Royal. "According to Phelps, France is one of the countries in most dire need of reforms. Royal would bring reforms, but aiming in the wrong direction." She will give an even larger role for the state. The horror! She wants to bring in social issues to the future European constitution, and raise the minimum wage in France, all bad things. Sarko on the other hand is a good neoliberal. Lower taxes and more much needed freedom for entrepreneurs. He is seen as bad on immigration, Ségo as better. She would, however, totally stagnate the French economy. Bad, bad Ségo.

Svenska Dagbladet:
Ségolène Royal irriterar och fascinerar Ségolène Royal irritates and facinates
Ségolène Royal presenterades nyligen som det franska socialistpartiets presidentkandidat inför valet nästa år. Men bilden av henne är kontrastfylld. Hon ger uttryck för konservativa värderingar samtidigt som hon värnar om medborgarinflytande och odlar en såväl ekologisk som glamorös image. Ségolène Royal recently became the presidential candidate for the French socialist party. Her image is full of contrasts. She expresses conservative values at same time as she supports citizens influence in politics. She is cultivating both an ecological and glamorous image.
December 27, 2006

Who is Ségolène Royal? Article looks at a book by Aymeric Montoux and Benoit Simmat: Ségolène Royal: La dame aux deux visages. Covers where she comes from, what she might stand for, her political career, and how it fits in with the French socialist party.

Svenska Dagbladet:
Sarkozy i bister uppgörelse med Chirac Sarkozy in bitter battle with Chirac
Alltsedan Nicolas Sarkozy valt att ingå i Balladurs kabinett 1993 har Jacques Chirac med alla medel motsatt sig att han ska bli Frankrikes nästa president. Från att ha varit något av en andlig son har Sarkozy blivit en frän kritiker av Chiracs tid vid makten. Ever since Nicolas Sarkozy chose to participate in the government of Balladur in 1993 has Jacques Chirac by all means available opposed his becoming the next president of France. From being something of a spiritual son he has become a strong critic of Chriac's time in power.
February 9, 2007

This is the Sarko version of the article above, by the same journalist, who in this case takes a look at Sarko's book: Témoignage. Same kind of "Who is he" story. The fight with Chirac and Villepin is centre stage.

Svenska Dagbladet:
Nicolas Sarkozy rycker fram Nicolas Sarkozy on the advance
January 31, 2007

Notes that Sarko has been going up, and Ségo down in the polls. Talks a bit about accusations against Sarko for abuse of power in using the security police to investigate his opponents, as well as the investigation into who stole the scooter of his son. Points to earlier accusations against Ségo and Hollande of tax evasion, and to Ségo's foreign policy gaffes.

Svenska Dagbladet:
Sociala frågor i centrum för Royal Social issues central for Royal
February 11, 2007

Here it is, finally, the presidential program of Ségolène Royal. Heavy on social issues, and developed with a new method of citizen input. The right to a home, education, and health care with increased minimum wage, smaller school classes in problem areas, mandatory schooling from age 3, and 10000 Euro interest free loans to all 18 year olds. We then get another run through of her sinking polling numbers and many gaffes.

Dagens Nyheter:
En drottning för republiken A queen for the republic
Leading article November 18, 2006

Ségolène Royal has become the French socialist party candidate for president. But the French socialist party is not a Nordic social democratic party. It is far away from accepting the inevitability of market principles and their demand for economic reform and adaption. "A liberal is a dangerous market economist in France" Then we get a bit on her novel approach of citizen involvement in programme development. Nicolas Sarkozy is also trying to be a new kind of candidate for France. He is very good at being at the spot when something happens. Concluding that France is facing an epochal election where both main candidates promise a new France.

Dagens Nyheter:
Ségolène Royal trampade i klaveret Ségolène Royal has stepped in it
December 3, 2006

Ségo's gaffes in Beirut are mentioned.

Dagens Nyheter:
Sarkozy leder i Frankrike Sarkozy in the lead in France
January 17, 2007

Sarkozy has officially become the presidential candidate of the right. He delivered a rhetorically skillful, emotional and very, very long speech. He presented himself as softer and more humble, promising to keep Turkey out of the EU, punish criminals, and force member referendums in unions before strikes. Day care for kids, 700000 new housing units, and state backed loans for home buying. After his speech he leads in opinion polls. Reports on problems within Royal's campaign. During a meeting a phone was left off the hook so that Le Monde's reporters could listen in on the disarray of the Socialist.

Dagens Nyheter:
Lönerna och miljön ska göra Royal till president Wages and the environment hoped to carry Royal to presidential victory
February 11, 2007

Ségolène Royal has gone into higher gear with the release of her programme. First, let's note the ups and downs in the polls of Sarko and Ségo, and how lately they have favoured Sarko. Ségo has been criticised for her participative method that has delayed the release of her programme. But, now a new start, with enthusiastic socialist party members in Villepinte. A clear left programme was presented. Increase in minimum wage and small pensions. Educational initiatives, military training for trouble youth, democratic reforms of the republic. Environmental issues gets a large spot in her programme.

Display:
Thanks for the comprehensive coverage. It's quite depressing.

The "Anglo-Nordic" success story is much liked, I gather, then?

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 09:32:58 AM EST
Great collection of information, someone. Thanks for this!

I don't know enough about the trends in Sweden at the moment, how well do the press reflect the feelings of the people about "neoliberalism."?

There has always been a strong "libertarian/Randian/Friedmanite" set of intellectuals in Scandanavia, really people who react strongly against the culture they find themselves born into (long period of social democracy etc.) And these people are forever quoted in the British press as proof that the UK has nothing to learn from Sweden et al.

But, how many in Sweden have they persuaded?

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 10:09:33 AM EST
I hope someone other than I can answer your questions, for they are also mine. Having been gone from the country for 10 years I simply don't know what the popular opinion is on this, or anything else for that matter. Leaving Sweden before getting really interested in politics also does not help. I am trying to learn about my country from afar. Not an entirely easy task!
by someone (s0me1smail(a)gmail(d)com) on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 10:18:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Interesting questions.

A neoliberal consensus dominates most of the big newspapers but there are some local leftwing papers and of course Aftonbladet which is (as is Expressen) an evening paper and therefore has more Britney and docu-soaps coverage.

Tv and radio is dominated by public service, SVT and SR. They have sort of a middle-of-the-road approach as they need to be perceived as objective. That tends to position them to the left of the press and they also act as some form of guidline to were the center is.

On the topic of how convinced the people is, I continue to note that the right bloc came to power by moving to the left and they are not moving out to the right with any considerable speed. Reinfelt seems to hold his party (Moderaterna, which dominates the right field) in very strict control and looks determined to keep them "the new workers party" which was their slogan this autumn. Of course they are to the right of Göran Perssons left wing government they replaced but not hugely so.

The socialdemocrats will choose Mona Sahlin as their next chairperson in March. All opponents has dropped out of the competition. She is generally considered to be in the right wing of the social democrats, however she is above all a skilled politician. In all likelyhood she will be the first female prime minister of Sweden (in 2010 or 2014). She would have been in 1995 or 1996 had she not been the target of a campaign probably in part directed from opponents within her party. This time it looks like she has everything under control.

What the social democrats strategy will be remains to be seen, but if she chooses to lead them to the left the election 2006 may very well be the year the swedish political spectrum turned left after drifting to the right for about two decades.

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!

by A swedish kind of death on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 12:42:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
looks determined to keep them "the new workers party" which was their slogan this autumn.

Their also? The Finnish Kokoomus, which is right of center, used that slogan also in the last elections. People laughed at them.

The socialdemocrats will choose Mona Sahlin as their next chairperson in March. All opponents has dropped out of the competition.

Is she the one whose credit card use came into scrutiny and was that part of the campaign you mention?

You have a normal feeling for a moment, then it passes. --More--
by tzt (tzt) on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 12:49:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Is she the one whose credit card use came into scrutiny and was that part of the campaign you mention?

Yes. She was sloppy and used the governmental credit card for personal expenses. IIRC, the investigation launched reached the conclusion (long after she had dropped out of the race and Göran Persson instead had become the chairperson and prime minister) that she was far from alone in doing so both in the socialdemocratic and the previous right bloc government. And when every krona had been counted the government owed her something like a couple of hundred euros. The media hype around this and the backstabbing from party members (LTEs protesting and such) led me to believe there was a campaign against her.

However, against her does not imply for someone in particular. When she declined the stage became somewhat empty and there was a lot of speculation before Göran Persson finally emerged as the only candidate. Perhaps the party was simply not ready to handle having a women as the party leader.

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!

by A swedish kind of death on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 10:48:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I agree with all of the above, except that the state radio, and especially the state tv are a bit left of center. They are probably doing their best to be objective, but since more than 70 % of Swedish journalists are leftists (and likely even more in the state media) they don't always succeed.

Also I believe choosing Sahlin as new party chairman for the socialists will be a disaster and mean the center right will win on walk over in 2010, due to Sahlins complete sloppiness, incompetence and fascination for the kind of issues (Sweden has no culture and all Swedes are inherently racist, there are no more important issues than gay and transsexual rights etc) which will send the socialist core voters (socially conservative industrial workers) into the arms of the center right and especially our own populist Le Pen light, Sverigedemokraterna.

It's unlikely we'll end up in a situation where they are the biggest workers party though, like in France...

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.

by Starvid on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 05:34:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Most American journalists are lefties too. It doesn't make the media particularily leftist over there. Journalists are employees.
by Trond Ove on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 06:55:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
due to Sahlin's complete sloppiness, incompetence and fascination for the kind of issues (Sweden has no culture and all Swedes are inherently racist, there are no more important issues than gay and transsexual rights etc)

This kind of person is pretty common in USA as well.  A couple of years back, I went to a meeting that was supposedly organized by the Greens of Minnesota.  It lasted over three hours.  Over a hour was spent debating how we could get behind the demand for reparations for slavery.  I wondered how we could extract money from people whose families had not even been in USA while slavery was still practiced.  Got me dirty looks.

BTW, in three hours there was NO discussion of environmental issues at all!!!

"Remember the I35W bridge--who needs terrorists when there are Republicans"

by techno (reply@elegant-technology.com) on Tue Feb 20th, 2007 at 01:48:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No, no, no. Italy is the sick man of Europe. Or was it Germany? Can't be France. Unless maybe France is the sick woman of Europe. That might work. Maybe Europe, except for the bits that are doing well by the accepted metrics and - seven year nation plans and central wage agreements notwithstanding - are therefore  obviously implementing the assorted reforms and things required by the High Church of the Market Most Free and Holy.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 10:16:38 AM EST
This is fascinating stuff for me.

I am old enough to remember when the Nordic countries had enough of their own personalities to rate Cold War lies.  The Sweden of Hammarskjold, Bergman, Gylenhammar, and especially Olaf Palme and Gunnar Myrdahl especially annoyed the Eisenhower boys. (Sorry for spelling errors.)

I live in Minnesota where there are enough Nordics so that at least the Democrats are essentially a Social Democratic party.  (One may argue that the Republicans in the state have a more legitimate claim on this title as Charles August Lindbergh, Sr., whose father was a reform member of the Riksdag before fleeing to USA because of a scandal, would go on to win five elections to the US House.  Of course, modern Minnesota Republicans are now mostly ignorance-worshipping Reaganites so Lindbergh has been LONG forgotten.)

As I see it, Nordic politicians have similar characteristics on either side of the Atlantic.  They come in two essential flavors. 1) The explorers--the folks who like to blaze new paths.  2) The hearth-tenders--the folks who understand that one very good way to survive winter is to pull your blanket over your head and wait for spring.    My theory is that no matter how successful life is with the explorers, eventually Nordics panic and look to "be normal" for a while.

I have a Finnish friend.  Very smart--a professor at the University of Helsinki.  This guy sent me home with 5 kg of books on Marx and Lenin when I first visited him in 1970.  He last visited me a year ago.  He was working on a book on Adam Smith.  He had spent a year in France and considered French society a largely a failure at multiple levels.  It had been a LONG intellectual journey!

I wondered how this could happen.  Two theories emerged.  1) Neoliberalism has been almost kind to Finland.  They are experiencing the closest thing to a "Golden Age" they have ever had.  Hard not to credit neoliberalism.  2) Small societies just assume the larger nations are worth emulating--in this case, England wins almost by default.

Unfortunately for the rest of us, societies that are rich and willing to emulate a culture that has almost no known virtues except how to make life more comfortable for the rich lose their effectiveness a laboratories for social experimentation.  Oh well, at least there are fewer Cold-War-style lies directed at the Nordics these days.

One hopes this situation does not last much longer.  This is a culture that admires its explorers.  One assumes the Nordics won't be led by blanket-over-the-head types forever.


"Remember the I35W bridge--who needs terrorists when there are Republicans"

by techno (reply@elegant-technology.com) on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 07:37:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
1) Neoliberalism has been almost kind to Finland.  They are experiencing the closest thing to a "Golden Age" they have ever had.  Hard not to credit neoliberalism.

Well, I guess that could be true, if Finland consisted only of the most well-off citizens. At the same time there are more people depending on Salvation Army food packages than in decades. Lots of people who crashed financially during the early 1990's recession still haven't recovered.

You have a normal feeling for a moment, then it passes. --More--
by tzt (tzt) on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 07:47:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
At the same time there are more people depending on Salvation Army food packages than in decades.

That in itself is worth a diary.

I have been very intrigued by the "Nordic Model" since I first read about it a couple of years ago.  And while some like oldfrog praise and advocate it, others here occasionally reveal glimpses of a grimmer, less shiny reality behind the banner.

Bush is too stupid to be able to ACT that stupid.

by marco on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 07:57:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I have NO doubt this is true.  Neoliberalism has been VERY hard on the poor--even in places as "successful" as Finland.

Yet compared to some other experimenters in neoliberalism, Finland has had quite the 15 years.

"Remember the I35W bridge--who needs terrorists when there are Republicans"

by techno (reply@elegant-technology.com) on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 07:58:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thanks for this round-up, someone. It seems the press is condemned to have a superficial or false view of what's going on even in nearby countries that are part of the same supra-national structure. Mostly they use agency dispatches, and almost always foreign correspondents, when they exist, are useless.

Why that is so should be a question for the European media review you suggest, and that I think would be a good idea.

(I'm looking at Le Monde for an article as promised to bruno-ken, then I was in fact thinking of an overview of French media.)

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 11:14:03 AM EST
Why that is so should be a question for the European media review you suggest, and that I think would be a good idea.

I am really hoping that some people would be interested in doing this. I think it might be a nice opportunity to test the collaborative powers of ET. Clearly a lot is going to be written about the French presidential election. Is there a way to create something like a 'debate', but with the 'story' part editable by everyone? A place to gather links to diaries, but also write some synthesis of the whole story as it unfolds? We could go with a wiki page, but I think a comment thread would be useful as well.
by someone (s0me1smail(a)gmail(d)com) on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 01:26:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A collaborative editing tool like that is lacking for the moment. Other than the Wiki.

But we could begin with separate diaries from different contributors, and reach agreement in the threads on what to add and what to place in a "final" or "summary" document, which one person could then be the final editor of..?

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 04:01:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I've added an update to the Far, Far Away diary to discuss some very interesting articles today in Le Monde.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 04:33:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Most important is a pretty precise and damning piece of writing by Raphaëlle Bacqué about how Sarko has "embedded" himself with the media over the last 25 years, particularly by his friendship with big media bosses. This is such an important article it calls for separate treatment in a piece on the media (as suggested by someone).

That article is huge.

Thanks for pointing it out.

Have there been any other diaries about the role of cozy connections with big media in the rise of authoritarian leaders in democratic countries?  (I recall a lot of discussion about Putin and the media, and of course there is Fran's Murdoch alert.  Fox News is too obvious, but I don't recall any diaries on Bush's connections -- direct or indirect -- to the media.)

So perhaps there's some sense of shame at Le Monde? Some wish to fight, on the part of some of the journalists?

Even if the journalists wish to fight, isn't it the editors who ultimately make the decisions on what gets published?

Bush is too stupid to be able to ACT that stupid.

by marco on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 06:59:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
you missed berlusconi, who is their guru, when it comes to massaging the public through his own media.

to watch how his message was spattered 24/7 pre-election last year was an object lesson in orwellianism, up close.

goebbels on steroids

he almost pulled it off, too.

brrr

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Tue Feb 20th, 2007 at 07:02:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Interesting.  Are Sarkozy's media connections really becoming une affaire in France now?

L'amitié Bouygues-Sarkozy "ne joue en rien sur l'information", se défend TF1

Bush is too stupid to be able to ACT that stupid.

by marco on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 07:53:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Not mainstream. But all those articles (three I quote, and this one you quote) in one day in Le Monde, are a departure from the usual blanket silence. These are journalists who are actually speaking out. Bacqué's article will not please Sarko.

Neither will this snippet from Philippe Ridet, the embed who can't shake off Sarko's familiarity:

Cette réputation de professionnel des médias, il y tient. Il porte ses scores d'audience comme des médailles et le chiffre des ventes des journaux dont il a fait la "une" lui sont une réassurance permanente sur ses capacités de séduction. Confondant volontiers les Français avec l'Audimat, il s'est fabriqué un statut, inédit chez les politiques, de "producteur-animateur". D'abord, il crée l'actualité, ensuite, il la commente.

This media pro reputation matters to [Sarko]. He wears his TV ratings like medals, and the sales of newspapers he was on the front page of are for him permanent reassurance on his powers of seduction. Willingly confounding the French with the Audimat (TV audience measurement system), he has built himself a previously unknown status among politicians, of "producer-presenter". First, he makes the news, then he comments on it.

The range and quality of these articles seems new to me. What it means in terms of editorial policy at Le Monde I have no idea for the moment.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Feb 20th, 2007 at 03:12:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Very useful post, thanks. I gather that "Svenska Dagbladet" is a cut above the others ?
by balbuz on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 12:04:32 PM EST
I think they are in many ways. They are one of the most rightwing in their editorial page but has generally a better (more fact-based) reporting then the rest.

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!
by A swedish kind of death on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 12:19:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"Dagens Nyheter" used to be good too in the fact department, but they have been going downhill. So has Svenska Dagbladet, but not as much.

Dagens Nyheter have an even more insane editorial page* than "Svenska Dagbladet", whose rampant neoliberalism is at least sometimes reined in by conservatism, or maybe it's just common sense. Except when they start mumbling about "idédebatt", ideas debate, that is plain neoliberal ideology, something the Swedish people has been rather resistant too, only electing a rightwing government after they promised not to be more neoliberal than the socialists were.

* including as a columinst stark raving mad neocon-zionist former vice pm Per Ahlmark.

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.

by Starvid on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 05:44:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"My" newspaper, Hufvudstadsbladet (the largest Swedish-language daily in Finland, based in Helsinki) seem to only be interested in the French presidential elections when there's a hint of a scandal. Royal's verbal "gaffes" and...uh..."Bruno Rebellegate" made it into the papers. They also did an article on Bayrou, but I seem to recall the focus being on the competition aspect of the campaign rather than on the issues. The editorial line is rather economically liberal.

"The basis of optimism is sheer terror" - Oscar Wilde
by NordicStorm (m<-at->sturmbaum.net) on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 12:12:07 PM EST
I should start reading Husari again.. We actually get it here in the Netherlands, mostly only one day late. (My mother-in-law subscribes Husari for us - she's worried that my husband will lose his Swedish since we speak only Finnish at home). The only trouble is, if I read it, I start mixing my Dutch and Swedish and end up saying stuff like "det var maar een leuk film det".

Anyway, Husari's culture pages are often better than Helsingin Sanomat's. (And none of this has much to do with the French elections, sorry for digressing..)

You have a normal feeling for a moment, then it passes. --More--

by tzt (tzt) on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 01:19:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Husis is not bad, but their editorials leave a bit to be desired at times. Like last year when they thought Niinistö should be president because both SDP and the Centre Party had had three presidents compared to the Coalition Party's two!?

"The basis of optimism is sheer terror" - Oscar Wilde
by NordicStorm (m<-at->sturmbaum.net) on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 01:39:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
LOL, well, at least they did not continue with "and then we should have three RKP presidents in tow, for equality's sake.."

You have a normal feeling for a moment, then it passes. --More--
by tzt (tzt) on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 01:41:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
sorry, SFP på svenska, of course.

You have a normal feeling for a moment, then it passes. --More--
by tzt (tzt) on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 01:42:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Haha, nah, I think even they realise a repeat of '94 is not likely to happen any time soon...particularly not with as uninspiring candidates as Henrik Lax!

"The basis of optimism is sheer terror" - Oscar Wilde
by NordicStorm (m<-at->sturmbaum.net) on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 02:03:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
... really..great diary...

The more I look at it.. the more I like Sego

A pleasure

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 12:43:42 PM EST
How do we go about doing a Spanish press review of the French presidential election?

"It's the statue, man, The Statue."
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 01:03:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It is not going any where.. but I can tell you ... if you want

El PAIS. SEGO A BOLD LEADER

EL PERIODICO: Sego a very bold leader

La Vanguardia: Interesting fight for power in France

El Mundo: Sego is nice but something tricky about her.

ABC: Sego in free fall

La Razon: Sego is a dangerous pinko communist with links to the underworld who wants to destroy the world

A pleasure

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Mon Feb 19th, 2007 at 01:17:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
LOL. Too much, too true.

Our knowledge has surpassed our wisdom. -Charu Saxena.
by metavision on Tue Feb 20th, 2007 at 07:10:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]


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