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European Salon de News, Discussion et Klatsch - 17 December

by Fran Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 04:12:30 PM EST

 A Daily Review Of International Online Media 


Europeans on this date in history:

1943 – Birth of Ron Geesin, a Scottish musician and composer, noted for his quirky creations and novel applications of sound. He is probably best known as the orchestrator and organizer of Pink Floyd's "Atom Heart Mother (suite)" in 1970,

More here and here

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En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 08:41:02 AM EST
Spanish PM lays down ambitions for rotating EU Presidency in 2010 _English_Xinhua
Zapatero highlighted four main priorities for the Spanish presidency.

    The first was the efficient application of the Treaty of Lisbon, which he considered vital to reach other goals.

    The second priority was to ensure economic recovery by enhancing cooperation between member states and the application of the Strategy for Sustainable Economic Growth.

    Zapatero also aimed to strengthen the EU presence and influence on the international stage, while his fourth main priority was to bring EU citizens closer to the bloc through developing rights and freedom.



En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 10:09:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
his fourth main priority was to bring EU citizens closer to the bloc through developing rights and freedom.

Even in Catalonia? The PP must be apoplectic at the prospect.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 11:12:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The Lisbon Treaty: Implications for Future Relations Between the European Union and the United States
Philip H. Gordon
Assistant SecretaryBureau of European and Eurasian AffairsStatement before the Subcommittee on Europe of the House Foreign Affairs Committee

The United States and the European Union form a community of shared values and a partnership of shared interests. We are united by our deep commitment to freedom, security, human rights, the rule of law, and open markets. Our 800 million democratically- governed citizens are bound together by enduring links of culture and commerce, by our shared history and our common hopes for the future. The EU is one of our most crucial partners in addressing regional and global challenges around the world. Our shared priorities cover all the major U.S. foreign policy concerns including: stabilizing Afghanistan and Pakistan, contending with the Iranian nuclear program, addressing global climate change, pursuing a permanent and comprehensive peace in the Middle East, managing our responses to the global financial crises, enhancing energy security, and promoting the spread of democratic and market reforms to every corner of Europe. The U.S.-European economic relationship is one of the central drivers of the world economy. For example, the value of U.S. goods and services exports to the EU is over five times the value of our exports to China, and from 2000 to 2008, over half of total U.S. foreign direct investment (FDI) was in Europe. Lastly, it is also worth noting the human dimension of our ties. Our links are not just those of shared values, trade ties, and political traditions, but also the millions of our citizens who travel each year to our countries to work, to study, or simply to visit.

...

We look forward to working with these new institutions as they define their new roles and develop their capacity. We fully recognize that the process of building up new institutions takes time; for our part, we are ready to engage. We hope EU member states will invest the post-Lisbon institutions with the authority and capacity to make concrete contributions to the pressing global challenges we face together.

...

The United States faces a daunting array of global challenges that no one country can handle on its own. For a variety of critical issues, from climate change, to the Doha Round of trade talks, from the Balkans, to Iran, solutions will require working in close concert with our European partners. We believe that the Lisbon Treaty represents a serious effort by our EU partners to streamline their policymaking process. We understand that, as with all efforts to reform complex institutions, this is a work in progress, and that it may take time for the new institutions to demonstrate their impact. Nevertheless, we hope that the changes brought by Lisbon will make the EU a stronger partner for the United States, and increase the role of Europe on the world's stage. We want the EU to be that stronger partner and we certainly intend to do our part to engage closely with the new institutions, but in the end their ultimate effectiveness will be determined by the will of EU Member States to invest in them. I thank you again, Mr. Chairman and members of the Committee, for the opportunity to appear before you on this subject. I look forward to answering your questions on this important topic.



En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 10:17:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The Lisbon Treaty: Implications for Future Relations between the European Union and the United States
by Sally McNamara

Testimony before the
Committee on the Foreign Affairs,
Subcommittee on Europe,
of the United States House of Representatives

...

Negative Foreign Policy Implications for the United States

...

The Lisbon Treaty's ability to rein in its members from taking independent action should also concern Washington. Under the Lisbon Treaty, EU member states are now required to consult the other members before undertaking international action and to ensure that their decisions are in line with EU interests.[8] Giving the EU the ability to supersede the autonomy of its member states in areas of foreign policy--such as the decision to join the United States in military action--will seriously impair the ability of America's allies in Europe to stand alongside the United States where and when they choose to do so. It will see America isolated and facing hostility from an organization which is designed to serve as a counterweight to American "hyperpower."[9]

...

A Threat to the Anglo-American Special Relationship

The institutional and political constraints imposed by the Lisbon Treaty will severely limit Britain's ability to build international alliances and independently determine its foreign policy. The biggest damage would be done to Britain's enduring alliance with the United States.

...

Conclusion

Europe doesn't need a constitution. The European Union is not the United States of Europe. The EU is a grouping of 27 nation-states, each with its own culture, language, heritage, and national interests. The EU works best as an economic market that facilitates the free movement of goods, services, and people. It is far less successful as a political entity that tries to force its member states to conform to an artificial common identity. The Lisbon Treaty will bring Europe much closer to the French vision of a protected, integrated European Union than the British vision of a free-trading, intergovernmental Europe. It will do huge damage to American interests in Europe; and contrary to any democratic tradition it is a self-amending treaty which can aggrandize power not explicitly conferred on it by the Treaties. As Lady Thatcher states in her seminal book Statecraft: "That such an unnecessary and irrational project as building a European superstate was ever embarked upon will seem in future years to be perhaps the greatest folly of the modern era."[15]




En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 10:23:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Migeru:
"That such an unnecessary and irrational project as building a European superstate was ever embarked upon will seem in future years to be perhaps the greatest folly of the modern era."

haha... nice try maggie!

what a fuckwit, nary a clue

there's one salty old paradigmer who looks like she'll die with her boots on, rather than admit what a colossally idiotic leader she was, while her son was raking in the $ in sierra leone, nasty work if you can get it!

what the hell was she afraid of, if not someone keeping a closer eye on the wrecking tools reagan and she forged?

some kind of euro-fascist takeover?

nah, just wogs begin at calais...

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 07:31:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Al Jazeera: Russian group awarded rights award

Three Russian activists critical of the Kremlin have received the EU's top human rights award, in recognition of the dangers they face in carrying out their work.

Lyudmila Alexeyeva, Sergei Kovalyov and Oleg Orlov from human rights group Memorial were awarded the Sakharov Prize, which comes with a $72,850 honorarium, at a European parliament ceremony in Strasbourg, France.

Jerzy Buzek, the European Parliament president, said despite the pride he felt for Memorial he also felt "bitterness that it is necessary to award this kind of prize in Europe".

by Sassafras on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 01:58:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
wonder how much gas that's going to cost us, lol...

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 07:34:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC News - Three MPs challenging expenses repayment call

Three MPs have become the first to challenge an auditor's request that they repay money they claimed on expenses dating back five years.

Liberal Democrat Jeremy Browne, Labour's Frank Cook and Conservative Bernard Jenkin are appealing against Sir Thomas Legg's findings.

Sir Thomas was asked to review all MPs' second home claims since 2004 after the expenses scandal broke in May.

MPs have until the end of the day to signal their intention to appeal.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 09:07:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
 ECONOMY & FINANCE 


En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 08:41:35 AM EST
Ben Bernanke - Person of the Year 2009 - TIME - Flash Player Installation

A bald man with a gray beard and tired eyes is sitting in his oversize Washington office, talking about the economy. He doesn't have a commanding presence. He isn't a mesmerizing speaker. He has none of the look-at-me swagger or listen-to-me charisma so common among men with oversize Washington offices. His arguments aren't partisan or ideological; they're methodical, grounded in data and the latest academic literature. When he doesn't know something, he doesn't bluster or bluff. He's professorial, which makes sense, because he spent most of his career as a professor.

He is not, in other words, a typical Beltway power broker. He's shy. He doesn't do the D.C. dinner-party circuit; he prefers to eat at home with his wife, who still makes him do the dishes and take out the trash. Then they do crosswords or read. Because Ben Bernanke is a nerd. (See pictures of Ben Bernanke's life from childhood to chairmanship.)

He just happens to be the most powerful nerd on the planet.



En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 09:03:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Bernanke says banks stabilized, but lending still weak | Reuters

After a "near-death experience," banks are wary of taking on the kind of risk that led to the crisis although they have rebuilt capital, he said.

The Fed has taken steps to loosen markets through programs that allow investors to invest directly in various forms of credit, such as auto loans and credit card loans.

But further steps are needed to pull the sector out of the "convalescent stage," he said.



En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 09:57:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]
banks are wary of taking on the kind of risk that led to the crisis although they have rebuilt capital,

Wish I could be certain this applied to the TBTFs. It is true that small and medium sized banks are very wary of loans just now.  Who knows what disasters the TBTFs, the Fed and the Treasury will still bring, and that could jeopardize any loan they make.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 12:03:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
"Useful" credit is not "the kind of risk that led to the crisis"...

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 05:54:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Credit that would be "useful credit" in "normal times" is in jeopardy during a financial collapse and "recession". Absent an effective clean-up and re-structuring of Wall Street, perhaps what we have is the "new normal."

Fasten your seat belts.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 11:06:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Goldman faces lawsuit over anticipated bonuses | Reuters
The lawsuit, filed with the New York Supreme Court by the Security Police and Fire Professionals of America Retirement Fund, names chief executive Lloyd Blankfein and other executives and board members as defendants.

Goldman has faced a maelstrom of criticism for setting aside billions for year-end payouts soon after the firm paid back its $10 billion taxpayer bailout.

Goldman is accused in the lawsuit of "blindly" rewarding executives "for corporate performance that has absolutely nothing to do with the skill of the company's employees." The lawsuit states that Goldman is estimated to issue payouts in excess of $22 billion.

That is a very interesting take on the bonus culture. Let's see what the court says.

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 09:53:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
As Goldman Thrives, Some Say an Ethos Has Faded - NYTimes.com
The gathering, held at the venerable New York Athletic Club, both celebrated Goldman's past and looked toward its future. What, Mr. Blankfein was asked, did he want his legacy to be?

Mr. Blankfein replied that like his predecessors, he hoped to position Goldman Sachs to capitalize on whatever opportunities might arise during his tenure. As bland as that might sound, few on or off Wall Street have seized opportunities in these troubled economic times as skillfully as Mr. Blankfein.

...

Interviews with nearly 20 current and former Goldman partners paint a portrait of a bank driven by hard-charging traders like Mr. Blankfein, who wager vast sums in world markets in hopes of quick profits. Discreet bankers who give advice to corporate clients and help them raise capital -- once a major source of earnings for Goldman -- have been eclipsed, these people said.



En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 09:55:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Blankfein's heroic role.



"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 12:11:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, he is an artist of sorts...and you can be sure HE will be in one of the lifeboats. The girl....maybe not.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 12:33:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]
the one of Geithner holding Turbo Tax® --"I've got the solution!"-- cracked me up.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 10:08:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
GM May Give Opel Workers Stake to Win Deal - BusinessWeek
An employee shareholding, along with profit sharing and the division's conversion into a German joint-stock company "can be part of the final settlement," Nick Reilly, who was appointed president of GM Europe today after running the unit on a temporary basis, said at a press briefing at Opel headquarters in the Frankfurt suburb of Ruesselsheim.

GM decided last month against selling Opel to Magna International Inc. (MGA) and instead plans a 3.3 billion-euro ($5 billion) reorganization of the unprofitable unit that would be financed mainly by European Union nations. Reilly said following a meeting with EU industry ministers in Brussels today that the plan's completion may take until the beginning of January.

The U.S. company is seeking 2.7 billion euros from EU countries where Opel and its sister Vauxhall brand have plants, with GM providing the remaining 600 million euros. Swedish Industry Minister Maud Olofsson, who led the meeting of her EU counterparts with Reilly, said before the gathering that GM won't be permitted to receive assistance that kept jobs in one nation at the expense of employees elsewhere in the bloc.



En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 12:38:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC: Cheques to be phased out in 2018

heques will be phased out by October 2018, but only if adequate alternatives are developed, the body that oversees payments strategy has said.

The board of the UK Payments Council has set the date in a bid to encourage the advance of other forms of payment.

The first cheque was written 350 years ago and the decision will be greeted with disappointment by some small businesses and consumers.

The Council said there should be "no scenario" for using cheques by 2018.

by Sassafras on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 01:09:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Is the US Financial Crisis Over?   Jesse

This frankness and honest statement of the situation is the reason that Paul Volcker, one of the most credible advisors in the Obama Administration, is a marginalized voice as compared to Larry Summers and Turbo Tim. Ironic, because only by assuming Volcker's leadership style can the US President hope to get his country out of this cycle of monetary bubbles, systemic fragility, and chronic imbalances driven by an outsized, counterproductive financial sector.

   DER SPIEGEL: But even though there are still more people being fired than hired, the Chairman of the Federal Reserve Ben Bernanke is saying that the recession is technically over. Do you agree with him?

    Paul Volcker: You know, people get very technical about these things. We had a quarter of increased growth but I don't think we are out of the woods.

    SPIEGEL: You expect a backlash?

    Volcker: The recovery is quite slow and I expect it to continue to be pretty slow and restrained for a variety of reasons and the possibility of a relapse can't be entirely discounted. I'm not predicting it but I think we have to be careful.

    SPIEGEL: What is the difference between this deep recession and all the other recessions we have seen since World War II?

    Volcker: What complicates this situation, as compared to the ordinary garden variety recession, is that we have this financial collapse on top of an economic disequilibrium. Too much consumption and too little investment, too many imports and too few exports. We have not been on a sustainable economic track and that has to be changed. But those changes don't come overnight, they don't come in a quarter, they don't come in a year. You can begin them but that is a process that takes time. If we don't make that adjustment and if we again pump up consumption, we will just walk into another crisis.

    SPIEGEL: The US has not yet instituted any kind of reform policy. What we see is the government and the Federal Reserve pouring money into the economy. If one looks beyond that money, one sees that the economy is in fact still shrinking.

    Volcker: What should I say? That's right. We have not yet achieved self-reinforcing recovery. We are heavily dependent upon government support so far. We are on a government support system, both in the financial markets and in the economy...




"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 01:55:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
FTC Challenges Intel's Dominance of Worldwide Microprocessor Markets
"Intel has engaged in a deliberate campaign to hamstring competitive threats to its monopoly," said Richard A. Feinstein, Director of the FTC's Bureau of Competition. "It's been running roughshod over the principles of fair play and the laws protecting competition on the merits"

You don't say! Intel "running roughshod over the principles of fair play"? Goodness me, what's next? Microsoft abusing its monopoly position? Say it ain't so...
by Bernard on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 07:35:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Project Syndicate - The Gold Bubble and the Gold Bugs - Nouriel Roubini
The recent rise in gold prices is only partially justified by fundamentals. Nor is it clear why investors should stock up on gold if the global economy dips into recession again and concerns about a near depression and rampant deflation rise sharply. If you truly fear a global economic meltdown, you should stock up on guns, canned food, and other commodities that you can actually use in your log cabin.

See also: A Couple of Thoughts for the Gold Bugs
by Bernard on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 07:39:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Dept. of buh BUH buh

U.S. Senators John McCain and Maria Cantwell proposed reinstating the Depression-era Glass-Steagall Act that split commercial and investment banking to rein in Wall Street firms in response to the financial crisis.

"Under our proposal, too-big-to-fail banks would be forced to return to the business of conventional banking, leaving the task of risk taking or management to others," McCain, an Arizona Republican, said at a Washington news conference. A former bank regulator said splitting up companies is "crazy."

McCain and Cantwell, a Washington Democrat, join other lawmakers in Congress proposing to reinstate the 1933 law, repealed a decade ago by the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act that led to a rise in conglomerates including Citigroup Inc., JPMorgan Chase & Co. and Bank of America Corp. active in retail banking, insurance and proprietary trading. Legislation to reinstate the ban was introduced today in the House.

Read more...

HR 4375(The text of H.R.4375 has not yet been received from GPO): To restore certain provisions of the Banking Act of 1933, commonly referred to as the "Glass-Steagall Act", and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Rep Hinchey, Maurice D. [NY-22] (introduced 12/16/2009)      Cosponsors (5)
Latest Major Action: 12/16/2009 Referred to House committee. Status: Referred to the House Committee on Financial Services.

COSPONSORS(5), ALPHABETICAL [followed by Cosponsors withdrawn]:     (Sort: by date)
      Rep DeFazio, Peter A. [OR-4] - 12/16/2009
      Rep Inslee, Jay [WA-1] - 12/16/2009
      Rep Kaptur, Marcy [OH-9] - 12/16/2009
      Rep McDermott, Jim [WA-7] - 12/16/2009
      Rep Tierney, John F. [MA-6] - 12/16/2009

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 09:10:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
 WORLD 


En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 08:42:26 AM EST
U.S. to test missile shield vs. Iran-style strike | Reuters
Speaking at the Reuters Aerospace and Defense Summit in Washington, Army Lieutenant General Patrick O'Reilly, the head of the Missile Defense Agency, said the roughly $150 million test was a departure from the more standard scenario of a North Korean attack.

It also would be more difficult testing the U.S. Ground-based Midcourse Defense (GMD) system against a missile that would be faster and more direct as it races toward the United States than a simulated strike from North Korea.

...

His comments came the same day that diplomats disclosed concerns among intelligence agencies that Iran tested a key atomic bomb component as recently as 2007. The finding, if proven true, would clash with Iran's assertion that its nuclear work is for civilian use.



En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 09:52:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Testing against a missile that will hit the sea just 5,000 miles short, now thats $150 million well spent.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 03:03:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yeah, but Iran might nuke the arctic and bring on climate change.  You can never be too careful.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 12:38:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Al Jazeera: Abbas' presidential term extended

The Palestine Liberation Organisation (PLO) has extended the mandates of both president Mahmoud Abbas and the Hamas-dominated parliament until new elections are held.

The decision was made by PLO's Central Council at a meeting in Ramallah on Wednesday.

Qaid al-Ghul, a PLO representative said: "The PLO took the decision that president Abbas and the Legislative Council will continue their duties until the next election in accordance with the Basic Law."


by Sassafras on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 12:56:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Telegraph: Indian jail aims to be world's first green prison

South Asia's largest prison - Tihar central jail in New Delhi - is hoping to become the first in the world to go green, by using renewable energy, recycled waste and cutting its electricity consumption.
by Sassafras on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 01:04:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Guardian: China stretches the imagination with world's longest sea bridge

China today announced it had begun construction of the world's longest sea bridge - barely 18 months after opening the current record-holder.

The Y-shaped link between Hong Kong, Macau and China will be around 50km (31 miles) long in total, 35km of which will span the sea, said the state news agency Xinhua. Due to be completed by 2015, the 73bn yuan (£6.75bn) cost of the bridge will be shared by the authorities in the three territories.

The structure also includes a 5.5km underwater tunnel with artificial islands to join it to bridges on each side.

by Sassafras on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 02:03:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Stimulus.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 12:41:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
WW43D?


URL

Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Terrorism, PL 107-40
NB. SCOTUS opinion of AUMF rationale in Hamdan v. Rumsfeld
TITLE 50--WAR AND NATIONAL DEFENSE, 50 US 33 War Powers Resolution,  Pub. L. 98-119, Pub. L. 93-148

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn says the state will need to get three appraisals in order to set a sale price for the property, which has seen an investment of state dollars exceeding $170 million. The prison would be sold to the Federal Bureau of Prisons, which would then lease part of the prison to the Department of Defense....

A letter outlining the purchase notes that federal departments and agencies, including the departments of Homeland Security, Justice and Defense, will work with state and local law enforcement authorities to identify and mitigate risks. Federal officials also have consulted with local, county and state law enforcement authorities to begin the process of identifying additional resources they may require to handle the increased population of federal inmates and detainees...

Congress also will likely get in on the act when the administration asks for money to buy the prison or seeks changes in federal law regarding the transfer of detainees to the U.S. Among those expecting the issue to be discussed in the nation's capitol is U.S. Rep. Phil Hare, D-Ill. "Language was passed earlier this year that said federal funds could not be used to house detainees on U.S. soil. That would have to be amended," Hare said Tuesday.

Read more...

Yet another funding option appears in Senate confirmation of the House appropriations bill passed today. It could increase the Federal Bureau of Prisons' budget by $170M plus payroll for "thousands" of shovel-ready jobs.


Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 08:59:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, Thompson seems well past "shovel ready". A very quick pay-off on infrastructure stimulus dollars. Perhaps Illinois will use the $170 million to finance more gentrification in areas beset by deteriorating public housing. That seemed close to Obama's heart.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 12:47:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Ouch.

I gotta say, the backstory @ wiki on Thomson Correctional Center construction --1,600 max-security cells, 200 min-security beds-- left an indelible impression of graft upon graft --before we even get to this this shining moment in justice served.

There's also that 3 appraisals requirement. That's gotta add a couple hundred Gs.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 10:19:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
But it is not "politics as usual".  It is politics as usual in Illinois.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 10:59:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
 LIVING OFF THE PLANET 
 Environment, Energy, Agriculture, Food 


En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 08:43:18 AM EST
BBC: EU agrees on 2010 fishing limits

The EU says European fishing fleets will have to cut their catches of cod, haddock and sole next year, but a ban on anchovy fishing has been lifted.

The quota for cod fishing is being cut by 15-35%, depending on the area. But there is an exemption for cod fishing in West Scotland and the Celtic Sea.

There are increased quotas for some fish, including plaice - by up to 14% - and herring - by 72% in the Celtic Sea.

Anchovy fishing will resume in the Bay of Biscay. A ban was imposed in 2005.

That is seen as good news for French and Spanish trawlers.

by Sassafras on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 01:47:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
EUobserver / EU ministers reopen anchovy fisheries

Under Tuesday's deal, fishing captains who agree to the installation of three security cameras onboard their boats will see their catch quota topped up by an extra five percent.

The cameras will play a double role, monitoring fish stocks to verify the accuracy of current scientific assessments, and a witness when fishermen illegally dump unwanted fish back into the sea.

"I know the fishing industry is fully behind these trials and I look forward to working with them as they progress," said the UK's fishery minister, Huw Irranca-Davies.

Note the editorialising by EUObserver when they headline this section with
Big brother is watching you


En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 02:01:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by Sassafras on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 01:51:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
NPR.org: Newly Discovered Planet Could Be A Watery World
If you could ride a spaceship to this planet -- which you couldn't, because it is 40 light-years away -- you would first approach the small, feeble red star that the planet orbits once every 38 hours, Charbonneau says. Then you'd see the planet, bigger and heavier than Earth, and probably enshrouded in an alien atmosphere.

Plunging down through that atmosphere, Charbonneau says, the light from the star would most likely dim and disappear until you were in darkness. Then, if you kept going down and your ship could survive the crushing pressure of the atmosphere, you might splash into a hot ocean.

At least, that's what Charbonneau and his colleagues think this planet is like. There's no way to know for sure, with current technology.




En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 04:25:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Johnny Ball booed by atheists over climate change denial - Telegraph

Ball, 71, claimed that spiders' flatulence was more damaging to the environment than fossil fuels, and criticised the "bad science" of global warming during a performance at a Christmas show in celebration of atheism and science.

Audience members at `Nine Lessons and Carols for Godless People' at the Bloomsbury Theatre, London responded with slow handclaps, whistles, jeers until he left the stage.One blogger who was in the audience wrote that Ball had delivered a "ten minute rant descending to an incoherent ramble" in which he said that he doubted the small proportion of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere can cause global warming.

They added: "A cry of `shame' from the audience broke the dam, the boos started and a perplexed and shaken-looking Ball was finally forced from the stage."



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 08:58:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A technology fetishist. He reads like someone who's afraid that DFHs are using a load of guff about climate change as an excuse to turn away from modernity and his beloved whizz bang techie stuff. But he ends up disputing hard science like the best of the corporate denialists.

As the variation on Clarke's 3rd law goes "Any sufficiently advanced incompetence is indistinguishable from malevolence".

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 06:25:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
He reads like someone who's afraid that DFHs are using a load of guff about climate change as an excuse to turn away from modernity

Well, he's not wrong there. There's a distinct thread of that running through the environmental movement - at it's extreme are the "humans should all kill themselves crowd" (you first, asshole) - but we also have the like of De's bizarre little utopias and people who believe breeding cart horses is the way of the future. Not a lot of science there, lots of science fiction and fantasy fulfillment.  

He can probably smell the whiff of bad science off a lot of what's being wittered about in the papers, and I can see how he could overreact to that. He's probably wrong, but I could see how he could get there.

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 06:33:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You technofetishist you.

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 06:41:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You know, that could possibly have been phrased more diplomatically. Sorry.

As mitigation, I'll blame high doses of anti-asthma medication that tends to make me jumpy and short-tempered. Or even-shorter-tempered.

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 06:44:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, whilst I accept your list does sound like a lot of what I bang on about, I'm just trying to be realistic about what is available now. I wish that the Stranded Wind initiative was 10 - 15 years into global implemenation. I wish that we were 10 - 15 years ahead in electrification of railways. That battery technology was exploiting the possiblities only recently discovered.

I don't turn my face against modernity, I just recognise that an awful lot of it depends on a cheap enegy paradigm that has no future right now.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 07:26:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I suspect we'll see some hard times ahead, but I doubt we'll see the 19th C again.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 08:27:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
And a good thing, too.

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 08:29:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
They had some very good hats. And sword canes. It wasn't all bad.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 08:32:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I have a cape, too bad the sword canes are illegal.

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 08:35:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Very good hats are £60 here.

Sword canes between $40 and $55 here.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 09:10:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
But the sword canes violate most cocealed weapon legislation in the civilised world...

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 09:17:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
They're on sale in America, from which we'll have to conclude...

Gadzooks! America is non-civilized!

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 09:42:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
But they cannot ship to all US states...

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 09:50:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Hey Colman!  Who's the asshole here?  Looking in a mirror while you're posting?  Channeling poemless?

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 08:23:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You've caught me. I am in fact poemless. Well known fact.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 08:31:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Poemless, I command you to leave Tactless' body!

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 08:34:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
<head spins, borchst sprays everywhere, a ghostly shirtless Putin manifests>
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 08:36:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Gaaaagh!

<runs away>

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 08:56:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Foes Unite to Support Bill on Old-Growth Forests NYT

Calling a truce in a long and bitter battle, timber executives and environmentalists united Wednesday in supporting legislation to codify and expand current protections for old-growth forests on federal land in eastern Oregon.

After nearly eight months of talks, representatives of both groups joined Senator Ron Wyden, Democrat of Oregon, at a news conference in Washington as he introduced a bill that would ban cutting of trees more than 21 inches in diameter and protect delicate watershed areas.

Such prohibitions are already in place in many forests but are administrative in nature rather than mandated by law, and subject to rollback at any time.

In return for their support for such limits, which they had previously fought, timber groups were promised steady, unimpeded access to younger trees as part of a broader program to assure the health of the forests and fire prevention.



"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 01:34:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That Tap Water Is Legal but May Be Unhealthy  Charles Duhigg NYT  

The 35-year-old federal law regulating tap water is so out of date that the water Americans drink can pose what scientists say are serious health risks -- and still be legal.

Only 91 contaminants are regulated by the Safe Drinking Water Act, yet more than 60,000 chemicals are used within the United States, according to Environmental Protection Agency estimates. Government and independent scientists have scrutinized thousands of those chemicals in recent decades, and identified hundreds associated with a risk of cancer and other diseases at small concentrations in drinking water, according to an analysis of government records by The New York Times.

But not one chemical has been added to the list of those regulated by the Safe Drinking Water Act since 2000.

Other recent studies have found that even some chemicals regulated by that law pose risks at much smaller concentrations than previously known. However, many of the act's standards for those chemicals have not been updated since the 1980s, and some remain essentially unchanged since the law was passed in 1974.

All told, more than 62 million Americans have been exposed since 2004 to drinking water that did not meet at least one commonly used government health guideline intended to help protect people from cancer or serious disease, according to an analysis by The Times of more than 19 million drinking-water test results from the District of Columbia and the 45 states that made data available. In some cases, people have been exposed for years to water that did not meet those guidelines.

 

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 01:46:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
 LIVING ON THE PLANET 
 Society, Culture, History, Information 


En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 08:43:45 AM EST
This story is seriously wrong... Let's caount the ways:

RTÉ News: Challenge to underage sex law

The boy's lawyers told the court the legislation proceeded on the basis that the boy was 'the guilty party' and the girl was a 'comely maiden' whose virtue must be protected.

...

Mr Hogan said the State's justification for the provision in the legislation was that an underage girl would be deterred from engaging in sexual activity by the prospect of becoming pregnant.

The Oireachtas had to 'equalise' the positions of a boy and a girl by providing an equal deterrent to a boy in the form of making the sexual activity a criminal offence, he said.

He added that no sane person would encourage a 14 and a 15-year-old to engage in sexual activity but he said this was nakedly gender based legislation.

He said no one would suggest that pregnancy in a young girl was something that could be countenanced but he said there was no comparison between pregnancy and the prosecution for a sexual offence, which would destroy a young life.



En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 09:09:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Unfortunately it reflects a prejudice in wider society. Women are always infantalised by the idea that they have often have no ownership of their sexuality. It is there to be defended or exploited by others, but the female herself is always the passive voice.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 06:32:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It's just all madness, from the idea that an honest belief about age shouldn't be a defence to the idea that a 13 year old boy having sex with a 16 year old girl is the criminal, which is pretty much how it works now.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 06:47:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
he said there was no comparison between pregnancy and the prosecution for a sexual offence, which would destroy a young life.

Unfortunately not true for "fundie" authoritarians, especially those from the Roman Catholic Church. That mindset is the origin of such grotesque laws.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 11:31:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Qantara.de - The Hypocrisy of Islam's Indignation
The result of the referendum on banning the construction of new minarets in Switzerland, the motherland of the Red Cross, is without a doubt the fruit of a campaign led by the Swiss People's Party (SVP), a right-wing populist and racist party, which exploited the widespread, vague fear of Islam in the West and stirred up other irrational fears to spread panic among the Swiss - as if Muslim armies stood before the gates of the Alpine country!

This development in Switzerland is also alarming because it signals a relapse into outdated modes of thinking and calls into question the principle of neutrality with respect to all religions in the modern constitutional state.

Nevertheless, it is important not to lose sight of one decisive fact: namely that the Swiss government rejected the ban initiative right from the start and, presumably with the help of human rights groups, will attempt to have this surprising referendum result overturned by the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg.


En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 09:33:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC News - European Muslims prefer mixed areas - survey
The work by the Open Society Institute (OSI), an independent think-tank, looked at the social integration of Muslims in 11 West European cities.

...

In the Kreuzberg neighbourhood of the German capital Berlin few Muslims identified themselves with their nation - not because they rejected German values but, it says, because society still sees them as "foreigners".

...

In the Netherlands recent controversies like the assassination of the film-maker Theo van Gogh by a Muslim extremist have "convulsed public opinion". Muslims, it says, have "become scapegoats for public anxieties over security".



En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 09:34:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
News Analysis - New Incidents Test Immunity to Terrorism on U.S. Soil - NYTimes.com

American Muslims, the reasoning went, were well assimilated in diverse communities with room for advancement. They showed little of the alienation often on display among their European counterparts, let alone attraction to extremist violence.

But with a rash of recent cases in which Americans have been accused of being drawn into terrorist scheming, the rampage at Fort Hood, Tex., last month and now the alarming account of five young Virginia men who went to Pakistan and are suspected of seeking jihad, the notion that the United States has some immunity against homegrown terrorists is coming under new scrutiny.



En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 09:43:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
NYTimes.com
the notion that the United States has some immunity against homegrown terrorists is coming under new scrutiny.

Oh, I see: Timothy McVeigh and Eric Rudolph were Muslims, right?
by Bernard on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 07:26:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
"Terrorism" now means "muslim extremist terrorism", except they don't believe it's an extreme position.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 07:47:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Its OK if you are a Right Wing Authoritarian, even if the Evil Liberal Media has twisted things so that it is impolitic to say so. (Unless you are a Fox "advocacy journalist".)

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 11:37:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC News - The media and the message
I can now read the paper onscreen, with some sections nicely cached for offline browsing and a cleverly designed user interface that lets me put the Media and Technology sections at the top of the paper, mark articles as favourites and quickly find related stories.

I can't - yet - buy anything like extra content, early access to stories or the ability to search the archive, but I would imagine that the business plans and functional specifications for those features are already being pored over at Kings Place, the paper's shiny new office near King's Cross in London.


They had better be, because one immediate result is that I have stopped buying the paper in the morning, except on Saturday when the social setting is completely different and scattered sections, coffee and conversation are a vital part of the weekend.



En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 10:01:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The Associated Press: Miami Herald asks online readers for donations

A link at the bottom of online stories directed readers to a separate page that accepts credit card information. A short message thanks them for making the site "South Florida's most-read news destination on the web," and asks them to support the content.

The McClatchy Co. newspaper has cut hundreds of employees in recent years as the weekday circulation of its print edition has fallen by almost 25 percent in the last year to about 163,000 and 14 percent on Sundays to about 238,000, according to the Audit Bureau of Circulations. By comparison, the paper says 5 million different readers visit its Web site each month.

...

Elissa Vanaver, a Herald vice president, said some readers had already donated, though she didn't have specific numbers. A short story about the decision ran Tuesday in the Herald's print editions, which cost 50 cents on weekdays and $1.50 on Sundays. The newspaper has no timeline for the plan.



En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 10:05:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
YouTube considering subscription fees for TV and film | Technology | guardian.co.uk

While a number of broadcasters - including Channel 4 and Channel Five - have already forged deals with the Californian website to show full-length programmes online, the company indicated yesterday that it may consider paid options as well.

In an interview with Reuters, Google executive David Eun - who is in charge of partnerships with media companies - confirmed that paid subscription was an option as it tries to convince more TV channels and Hollywood studios to sign up.

...

The move would be an attempt to forge agreements with more rights owners, many of whom are reluctant to put their content online without adequate compensation.



En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 10:05:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It depends how you use a newspaper. I rarely read the front pages as I get most of that online. What I'm interested in are the shorts that fill up the paper space, that are almost unfindable online. These are the things that contain lots of good info, yet you browse them at high speed to find the nuggets that catch the eye. You don't read them item by item as you'd have to online.

I actually find the layout of websites difficult to browse as headlines are still not partiuclarly informative and papers don't use tagging intuitively enough. Searches, particularly on the telelgraph site, are a descent into immediate irrelevance.

And the saturday guardian is the worst of the week. It's the one issue I don't mind missing if I'm not around.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 07:13:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Helen:
It depends how if you use a newspaper.

Fixed.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 11:35:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Australia Internet filtering a test case for global clean-feed - IDC, isp filtering, Minister for Broadband, Senator Stephen Conroy - ARN
Minister for Broadband, Senator Stephen Conroy, released the long-awaited Internet filter trial report yesterday and announced the Government's plan to introduce a mandatory ISP-level filtering legislation to Parliament.

...

Cannon criticised the unbridled nature of the Internet, claiming existing regulations were too lax. He saw online content control as an inexorable and necessary outcome.

...

While wary of Australia becoming the next "Great Firewall", like China's stringent Internet censorship regime, Cannon claimed the ISP filtering plan would be dictated by society and less so by Government.



En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 10:03:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Cannon claimed the ISP filtering plan would be dictated by society and less so by Government.

That should insure against sexism and homophobia then?

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 01:01:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC: Scientists crack 'entire genetic code' of cancer

Scientists have unlocked the entire genetic code of two of the most common cancers - skin and lung - a move they say could revolutionise cancer care.

Not only will the cancer maps pave the way for blood tests to spot tumours far earlier, they will also yield new drug targets, say the Wellcome Trust team.

by Sassafras on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 01:13:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Great! Now Welcome to the patient's and taxpayer's pocketbook. Your money or your life.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 11:41:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The Times and Bit.ly Roll Out `nyti.ms' Short Links - Bits Blog - NYTimes.com

Eagle-eyed fans of Twitter and The New York Times may have noticed a change in the Web addresses used to share some articles from The Times's Web site on Twitter. Beginning Wednesday, the links are compressed into a custom New York Times URL that begins with "nyti.ms."

The customized links are powered by Bit.ly, a New York-based start-up that has become the de facto service



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 05:04:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC condemned for pulling ballet featuring pregnant nuns and wild sex | Stage | guardian.co.uk

When Javier de Frutos's dance tribute to the great Russian impresario Diaghilev premiered in London on 13 October, the work - with its deformed pope, pregnant nuns and wild sex - received a mixed reception: walkouts and boos combined with an ecstatic response from its fans.

It was a succès de scandale, recalling the brawls at the premiere of The Rite of Spring in 1913, which Diaghilev famously commissioned. The following day, the BBC announced it would broadcast the piece, along with three other new dance works commissioned by Sadler's Wells in honour of Diaghilev and the Ballets Russes.

But last month it became clear that the BBC had decided pull the transmission of De Frutos's work, set for a pre-watershed slot on Friday on BBC4 - and now de Frutos is hitting back at a decision he believes is "silly as well as dangerous".



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 05:50:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC News - Jewish school loses places fight

The Supreme Court has found a Jewish school guilty of race discrimination for refusing places to pupils it did not consider to be ethnically Jewish.

Nine justices ruled, by a small majority, that the JFS in London had breached race relations legislation.

The case was brought by a Jewish man whose son was not given a place because his wife was not regarded as Jewish under rules set by the Chief Rabbi.

The parents were angry that their Jewish status was being questioned.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 06:23:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Photographer beaten, detained in London for being "cocky" to policeman who implies she is a terrorist Boing Boing
In this video, two British police officers come up to a young woman who is filming a building and harass her, imply that she is a terrorist, intimidate her, demand to see her footage. The policeman says that he's harassing her for being "cocky" -- punishing her for failing to cringe sufficiently


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 09:03:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Of course, police believe that anyone who does not comply with their demands, however unjustified or unlawful, is a problem and a threat to "order" who must be "dealt with".

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 07:18:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
uh oh, the anti-Niebuhr

Whether Obama deserved the Nobel Peace Prize is not the point. He didn't. The fact is, he got it, and was gifted with the chance of a lifetime to make a classic speech on the politics of peace-making, a speech that in the glare of Nobel could have attained instant standing.

He failed miserably, producing a hodge-podge that resembled the work of a bright but undisciplined sophomore.

He was hoist on the  petard of  classical "just war theory," a theory that, properly understood, condemns his decision to send yet more kill-power into Afghanistan.

This theory which is much misused and little understood is designed to build a wall of assumptions against state-sponsored violence, i.e. war. It puts the burden of proof on the warrior where it belongs.

Read more...



Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 09:38:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Jay Rosen and Clay Shirky | NYU Journalism "Primary Sources"
Jay Rosen and Clay Shirky discuss what's happening in journalism after its disruption by technology. Rosen, a student of the press, is associate professor of journalism at NYU and the author of What Are Journalists For? Shirky, a student of the Internet, is an adjunct professor in NYU's graduate Interactive Telecommunications Program and the author of Here Comes Everybody.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 10:32:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
According to Ofcom, hours per day watching TV:

USA 4.6
UK   3.8
Sweden 2.7

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 04:30:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Artistic men are happier, study finds

Scientists have found that men who took the time to engage in cultural activities or artistic pursuits were less likely to suffer from depression, a condition that affects one in five Britons.
Cultural factors were shown to have a stronger effect on happiness than personal wealth or occupation.


You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 04:56:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Agunbiade was subsequently called in to chat with Newsom. The conversation between the mayor-who-slept-with-his-appointments-secretary and the department-head-accused-of-sexually-and-religiously-harassing-his-spokeswoman (in writing!) must have been one for the ages. Whatever was said, the outcome was this: Agunbiade resigned not long after, and Dennis this year received a $91,000 settlement from the city.

Minus the alleged harassment, city government is filled with Yomi Agunbiades -- and they're hardly ever disciplined, let alone fired. When asked, former Board of Supervisors President Aaron Peskin couldn't remember the last time a higher-up in city government was removed for incompetence. "There must have been somebody," he said at last, vainly searching for a name.

Accordingly, millions of taxpayer dollars are wasted on good ideas that fail for stupid reasons, and stupid ideas that fail for good reasons, and hardly anyone is taken to task.

Read more...



Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 09:28:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
 PEOPLE AND KLATSCH 


En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 08:44:18 AM EST
For tsunami's Baby 81, fame brought misfortune | Reuters
People assumed he was getting rich off the publicity and began hounding him. He could not get local aid because charities believed he had been paid for the trip to New York. He moved the family from their village in Kalmunai to the city of Batticaloa, on Sri Lanka's east coast.

Unlike many tsunami survivors who were given houses by the government, Abhilash and his family stay in an unfinished two-room house built on his aunt's land.

As for the boy himself, he says he still doesn't know what happened to him, or why the media come looking for him on a tsunami anniversary.



En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 09:48:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Independent: Found: The Gillrays that were too rude for the Victorians

To a modern eye, the pictures look elaborate, funny, somewhat dated and a little bit naughty. But around 160 years ago, someone in authority was so disgusted by them that the entire album of 40 drawings - including these four examples - was seized and consigned to a vault in the Home Office. There it stayed, forgotten, long after ideas on what was fit for the public to see had liberalised.

Then two years ago the Home Office was broken up and many of its functions transferred to the newly created Ministry of Justice. That involved moving personnel, equipment and files to new MoJ headquarters. As a mountain of old files came in from the department that dealt with pornography, David Pearson, an MoJ civil servant, came upon an unusual find which, on examination, turned out to be drawings by James Gillray, one of the greatest political caricaturists in history.

by Sassafras on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 12:49:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Telegraph [UK]: Olympic weightlifter gives birth while training
Elizabeth Poblete, 22, did not know she was pregnant, and called for a doctor when she felt unwell a week ago while hoisting weights in the gym in Sao Paulo, where she lives.

...

Doctors calculated that Miss Poblete must have been six months pregnant. The training and diet observed by female weightlifters can cause irregular menstruation.

Miss Poblete competed for her country in the Beijing Olympics last year. She had been seeking to beef up her body to move from the 75-kilo category to 85 kilos over the past few months.



En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 03:39:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Did you know Discovery (nyuk, nyuk) Health Channel broadcast to America a series titled "I didn't know I was pregnant"?

"Meet these fascinating women and their "surprise children" as they explain how they didn't know they were pregnant. I Didn't Know I Was Pregnant airs Sunday, January 17, at 10 am. Find more airdates and sign up for an email reminder."

Oh yes Militant Electrician told me so.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 10:54:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Nice to see my old pal Ron Geesin in the diary header. He introduced me to a lot of crazy recording techniques during the time we used to meet regularly late Sixties to early Seventies. One which was truly inspiring was his use of 3 or 4 Revox G36 reel to reels lined up side by side with a single reel of tape running through all 4 sets of heads. It was a giant adjustable Watkins Copicat tape echo machine where the repeats could be spread out over several seconds, and with judicious positioning of the G36s the repeats would fit into the bar structure.

I've always had very much time for the company of eccentrics. 'Professor' Bruce Lacey was another who blew the mind of this nice middle class lad. And Quentin Crisp - though I only met him a few times. Eccentrics seem to be focii for convergence of disparate influences. Do we have fewer eccentrics today? Are we homogenized? Do we all have the same information?

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 05:20:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Do you know anything about how Les Paul did his live overdubbing and multitracking ? He was 20 years ahead of Fripp and Eno.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 07:21:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't, but the Revox G36 (stereo) was the first tape recorder that allowed to you easily 'bounce' tracks. The same effect was achieved much earlier by recording onto acetate, playing the acetate back and playing along with it onto a new acetate. Later the same was done with mono recorders - with a loss of quality at each stage.

It wasn't until multitracks came along that the quality was more controllable. If I recall correctly, Les Paul was involved in creating the first multitrack recorders - maybe late 40's?.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 08:50:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
In mono one records a basic track, say drums, bass and rhythm guitar, and then plays it back while running the track through the console and adding, say, a lead guitar and re-recording the augmented mix on the same or a different recorder. Rinse, repeat. Best to roll off the high frequencies a bit to prevent a build-up of hiss. With a stereo or four track machine you could "ping pong" the new mix to a different track.  If you were satisfied, this could become the new mix and the old mix track could be recorded over. It wasn't really until the advent of eight track recorders that things began to change towards what we would call multi-track recording.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 11:59:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I looked it up and Paul was involved with the creation of the first 8-track using 1" tape. I'm not sure what other technology of the time was using 1", but it's only a matter of slitter pitch on the big rolls that are cut down into reels. Can't find a date, but I guess around 1950.

Incidentally, AFAIK the outside of the manufactured roll was more prone to uneven coating and thus provided the cheaper brand tapes.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 01:31:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
1955.  See here. I got involved in recording studios in the fall of '69. The studio where I worked on the console had just gotten a eight track. A year later they got a 16 track.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 02:28:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
1948 for the adaptation of the Ampex machine?

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 02:32:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ampex built a handful of machines during the late 1950s that could record as many as eight tracks on 1" tape, though four-track machines were widely considered state-of-the-art until about 1967.

This fits with my memory. Artist's Recording Studio, where I worked, had relied on Ampex AG 300s until just  before I started there.  That was a machine!  Massive deck, great precision. Giant channel electronics. I am having trouble remembering if we had a Sculley 8 track or another imitation AG-440 series. 3-M had just hit the market with their "Iso-Loop" tape drive and miniaturized electronics. I remember seeing it at the Spring, 1970 Audio Engineering Society show in LA. Studer was there, but I do not recall ever seeing Lyrica.

Bing Crosby had a lot to do with bringing Ampex and professional audio recording together. Jack Mullin of the US Army Corps of Engineers had been tasked to investigate German recording technology and "acquired" two Magnetophon machines and brought them back to the US after the war.  He then produced modified versions, met Crosby, who hated live broadcast, and Crosby made him his chief engineer, brought in Ampex as a manufacturer, and Crosby insisted on prerecording his shows and got a job so doing for ABC in 1947.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 06:26:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A studio I built and ran in Helsinki had a Helios desk and a 16 track Lyrec. We suspected that one of the tape ops/roadies (who all had keys) was bringing in his friends to secretly record at the weekends. They concealed it very well - the place was clean and tidy on Monday. And yes this was a Commie company, so we didn't work weekends.

I caught them because their knowledge of tape machines was limited to the top and front. What they did not know was that most pro machines have an hour timer at the back, for maintenance checks. It was easy to check it on Friday and Monday.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 02:43:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
So, as a good Commie Organization, did you send the miscreant to Siberia?

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Fri Dec 18th, 2009 at 11:50:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Effectively...

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Dec 18th, 2009 at 11:56:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I learned ping-ponging (bouncing) on those G36s;-)

I had 4 of them. It was also possible to start 3 of them at the same time and have them run fairly synchronously for a couple of minutes. That way I got 6 playback tracks + live inputs going down onto stereo.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 01:35:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
 SPECIAL FOCUS 
 COP15 


En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 08:46:27 AM EST
Activists arrested in Copenhagen protests - CNN.com

Kristina Larsen, a spokeswoman for Climate Justice Action (CJA) -- the group organizing the protest -- told CNN that police have used pepper spray and dogs to contain the protests.

Around 3,000 activists convened at two railway stations in the Danish capital early on Wednesday and began their march towards the Bella Center -- the scene of the climate talks.

CJA is calling for activists to "take over the conference for one day and transform it into a 'People's Assembly'."



En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 09:56:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Evo Morales stuns Copenhagen with demand to limit temperature rise to 1C | Environment | guardian.co.uk
Two of the world's two most radical presidents today shook up the Copenhagen climate change summit by blaming climate change squarely on capitalism and demanding billions of dollars in "reparations" from rich countries.

Bolivian President Evo Morales called on the world leaders to raise their ambitions radically and hold temperature increases over the next century to just 1C. In the most ambitious statement yet made at the climate summit, Morales demanded rich countries pay climate change reparations and proposed an international climate court of justice to prosecute countries for climate "crimes".

"Our objective is to save humanity and not just half of humanity. We are here to save mother earth. Our objective is to reduce climate change to [under] 1C. [above this] many islands will disappear and Africa will suffer a holocaust," he said. Limiting warming to 1C would need an end to all emissions and billions of tonnes of carbon dioxide to be sucked from the air and stored.



En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 12:39:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
PRESIDENT EVO MORALES: [translated] And if we don't--and I repeat this--we're going to end our lives, all of us. So, as with the last country and with our black and indigenous brothers who were treated as slaves, and their rights were not recognized, now, today, too, our Mother Earth, she is treated as if she were a thing without life, as if she didn't have rights.

The second climate debt is the use of atmospheric space by the developed countries. It's not possible that atmospheric space be the exclusive property of just a few countries for their development, that the countries that are irrationally industrialized have taken over, with their greenhouse gases, the atmospheric space. To pay this debt, they should reduce their emissions and absorb their greenhouse gases in a way that there exists a fair distribution of atmospheric space between all of the countries, taking into consideration their population, because the countries that are on the path of development need atmospheric space for their development.

The third component of climate debt is the paying of reparations, reparations for damages that have been created by the irrationally industrialized countries. For humanity together, it's shameful that the Western countries have only offered $10 billion for climate change. I was looking at some figures.

Read more



Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 07:50:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Goodman interviews Morales now @ DemocracyNow!

streaming video, podcast later, trannie later

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 08:25:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
our Mother Earth, she is treated as if she were a thing without life, as if she didn't have rights.

Oh dear. More nonsense.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 08:34:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Hold on there, Colman, you might want to parse that.  Morales comes from a culture where for tens of millenia that was a given.  And I for one don't think all the science regarding consciousness is complete yet. There may well be higher levels of consciousness we don't understand yet, as the ancients have been telling us since time immemorial.

Come to think of it, Olaf Stapledon's Star Maker shows it's possible for UK citizens to understand the concept.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 09:23:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't especially care: it's just different superstition: I'd rather we just skipped the superstition entirely.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 09:52:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Care to explain how you come to dismiss as superstition --some magical apprehension?-- the fragment that you quote?

You may want to compare customs implied by Morales's apparently inexplicable respect for the planet, as an ongoing concern --

Government agents confer rights to human persons and immortal, insubstantial persons, i.e. a corporate  "entity".  A right is a legal construct. Sovereignty is a legal construct. Private property rights is a legal construct--

I can't recall where right now, but I've seen headlines on litigation in the US to animate forests rights. Or was it a watershed. hmmm... mebe a pint will jog me plaque...


Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 11:22:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Currently watching an Evo interview on Democracy Now!  Great stuff!  I should move down there and get to work.

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 08:27:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Actually, you likely could help significantly. Y habla espanol tambien?  I would note the elevation of La Paz and check to see about health care, the internet, etc. I  thought of moving to the Mexican altiplano around Guadalajara when we were living in Northridge, CA and deciding where to go in the summer and fall of 2005.  

Mexican real estate agents are speculating that Mexico will be the first foreign country authorized to accept US Medicare payments. Current US Medicare physician payment levels would well exceed what is usual and customary there and, if properly negotiated, could benefit both US Medicare and the Mexican healthcare industry. But they are likely dreaming.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Fri Dec 18th, 2009 at 09:21:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Copenhagen breakthrough as Africa signals support for $100bn funding proposal - 16 Dec 2009 - BusinessGreen.com
As flagged earlier today, Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zenawi told the summit that the African group of nations would scale back climate funding demands into line with the $100bn a year proposed by the UK and endorsed by a number of industrialised countries.

...

Zenawi added that African Nations would also support plans for a $10bn fast track fund that would run between 2010 and 2012, and back proposals from industrialised nations that much of the long term funding is "financed by creative financing mechanisms", such as levies imposed on the carbon market.

The move is a significant breakthrough as it appears to bring the funding expectations of a large number of developing countries into line with what key industrialised nations are offering. To date China has been calling for long term funding from developing nations to be in the region of one per cent of industrialised nation's GDP or $600bn a year from 2020. But with China stating that it does not expect to receive much, if any, of that funding, the move from African nations to accept a more modest offer will raise hopes that an agreement on funding will be reached.



En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 12:40:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Migeru:
into line with the $100bn a year proposed by the UK and endorsed by a number of industrialised countries.

isn't this a bit like bribing them to stfu while the energy tycoons continue to milk their barely awakening public as long as they possibly can?

and with those kinds of numbers to buy silent, grateful compliance (keep mum), what the f. are they earning, one may wonder...

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Wed Dec 16th, 2009 at 07:49:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
karaoke title, Buh Weet Sings, track "????"

Todd Stern: "I'm not anticipating any change in the mitigation commitment. I think that's something that the President announced just--I don't know, I guess it was a couple of weeks ago. And so, I don't think there's going to be a change in that commitment."

Stern also renewed his opposition to the payment of climate reparations to poorer countries most affected by global warming.

Todd Stern: "We fully recognize our historic role in putting emissions up in the atmosphere, and we also fully recognize our responsibility to be part of an overall global effort to help poorer countries, both with regard to the need to adapt to the impacts of climate change and the need to help them develop on a sustainable path, which at this point in our collective history means low carbon path. Reparations, to me, conveys a sense of culpability, guilt, that kind of thing. I just--I don't think that that's a legitimate--a legitimate way to look at it."

For further information read Angelica Navarro, Chief Climate Negotiator for Bolivia, Introduction to Climate Debt: "We're not begging for aid," 9 Dec 2009

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Thu Dec 17th, 2009 at 10:03:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]


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