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Thursday Open Thread

by In Wales Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 10:25:36 AM EST

The thread is open


Display:
I guess I can dare post this: :-)

Austrian company under fire for recruiting certain zodiac signs - Telegraph

An Austrian insurance company has come under fire for recruiting workers born under certain star signs.

An advertisement published in major Austrian newspapers said the company was seeking employees for sales and management - but only certain star signs need apply.

"We are looking for people over 20 for part-time jobs in sales and management with the following star signs: Capricorn, Taurus, Aquarius, Aries and Leo," read the advertisement that appeared at the weekend.

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 10:27:28 AM EST
Boy, that's a discrimnation suit waiting to happen.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 10:31:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It would be fun to see the insurance compay arguing its case using actuarial data.

Most economists teach a theoretical framework that has been shown to be fundamentally useless. -- James K. Galbraith
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 10:35:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 10:43:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Aries was the worst-performing star sign, being responsible for nearly 9% of all road accidents. Astrologers say that Ariens have a natural 'me first' attitude that could contribute to dangerous impulsiveness on the road.

I'm shocked. "Nearly 9%" of accidents contributed by 1/12 the population? Who'd have thought it?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 10:45:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Details of the exact distribution would certainly be useful.
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 10:57:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Confidence intervals would be nice.

Most economists teach a theoretical framework that has been shown to be fundamentally useless. -- James K. Galbraith
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:06:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Actually, I already have enough information for a univariate confidence interval for Aries :-) Will do it at home.

Most economists teach a theoretical framework that has been shown to be fundamentally useless. -- James K. Galbraith
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:08:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I've asked their press office to email me a detailed breakdown, if they have one.

We'll see what they come up with.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:50:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
1/12? Are births really uniformly distributed throughout the year? I would guess not, but I've no idea which signs are over-represented.
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:15:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well... 9% is 1/11

Most economists teach a theoretical framework that has been shown to be fundamentally useless. -- James K. Galbraith
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:18:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That's a media-reported "nearly 9%"- which may or may not be significantly larger than 1/12th.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:19:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The sample size to tell 1/11 apart from 1/12 with 95% confidence is...?

Most economists teach a theoretical framework that has been shown to be fundamentally useless. -- James K. Galbraith
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:20:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
No clue. I only ever knew how to do that for about 20 minutes in 1989.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:25:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh I'm glad someone else is like that. I thought I was the only one who walked out of an exam room, turned their head to one side and let all the useless info drip out. (then go to pub)

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:46:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Whaddayamean useless?

Most economists teach a theoretical framework that has been shown to be fundamentally useless. -- James K. Galbraith
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:57:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Most people really don't need that stuff y'know.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 12:07:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Most people don't get involved in this kind of comment thread :-)

Most economists teach a theoretical framework that has been shown to be fundamentally useless. -- James K. Galbraith
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 12:10:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
yea, but statistically I mean...

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 01:00:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Statistically, ET's population vs that of the Earth is very low at almost any confidence level you care to name.

And yet - here we are. :)

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 01:02:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
My first estimate was 22160, but I am not sure whether my methodology is standard.

Let's see with a dumb summation: If I make the decision cut at 1929/1930 out of 22160, the chance to make a mistake with either of actual probabilities (1/12 or 1/11) is... at most 2.3% - I suppose that meets 97.7% confidence. The doubling down to ~2.5% is not surprising, as here we do not mix the far-away tails.

Here are the errors for lesser samples:
Cut at 1741/1742 for 20000 samples: <3.0%
Cut at 1567/1568 for 18000 samples: <3.7%
Cut at 1393/1394 for 16000 samples: <4.6%
Cut at 1305/1306 for 15000 samples: <5.2%

Oops, 15000 samples is not enough.

Cut at 1349/1350 for 15500 samples: <4.8%
Cut at 1323/1324 for 15200 samples: <5.0%

by das monde on Fri Feb 6th, 2009 at 12:11:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Though the "nearly" could bring the difference down to telling 8.5% apart from 8.33%

Most economists teach a theoretical framework that has been shown to be fundamentally useless. -- James K. Galbraith
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:22:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Assuming that they're not just "rounding" 8.34 up to 9 ...
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:23:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
"White people were the worst-performing race in Vermont, being responsible for over 98% of all road accidents."

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:22:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
And here I thought that people who select red cars have more accidents.
by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:56:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No it is because red cars go faster.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:59:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That needs serious explanation. Does red reduce wind friction or something better than yellow.

Yellow, I notice, attracts more insects (unless of course the sum of the digits of the car plate equals 9....)

by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 04:02:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The ET Business PlanTM does not project discussion of numerlology until Q3 2009 at the earliest.  Please restrict your comments to astrological evaluation of the Financial Great Times.  the Numerlology upgrade is still in beta, as is the Numerology upgrade.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 04:12:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Numerlology is a permitted spelling, but you are requested to refrain from using the proscribed spelling astrology. The authorized form is astrolology.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Feb 6th, 2009 at 01:49:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I stand corrected, square in the 7th house.

Lology, the science of laughing out loud while staring alone at a computer screen.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Fri Feb 6th, 2009 at 02:45:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
No, the science of laughing out loud is correctly spelled "lalalology."

It comes from ancient Greek.

As Horace put it:

pone sub curru nimium propinqui
solis in terra domibus negata:
dulce ridentem Lalagen amabo,
     dulce loquentem.

by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Fri Feb 6th, 2009 at 06:13:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Of course we shouldn't exclude the variant "Lalagology."
by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Fri Feb 6th, 2009 at 06:14:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Windmills, then, should be painted red.
by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 05:55:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
With a go-faster strip as well of course.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 06:51:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
and red is the colour of aries!

it all makes so much sense...

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 04:07:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
We should conclude that windmills should be built under the sign of Aries and painted red.
by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 07:44:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No, windmills should be built under an Air sign, either Gemini, Libra or Aquarius.

however it would be best under a mutable sign, ie one where what is there is adapted to new purpose. Mutable signs are Gemini, virgo, Sagittarius or Pisces, so for windmill ot's obvious that it should be under the sign of Gemini

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Feb 6th, 2009 at 06:09:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
A bit of self promotion there, I dare say? I for one suffer the same sign with Acquarius rising, the moon in Scorpio, Venus in Leo, a couple of nasty conjunctions involving Mars, Mercury retrograde, Sun and champagne descending.
by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Fri Feb 6th, 2009 at 06:20:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
OMG, what did I do!

But you do have an interesting astrological profil. :-)

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Feb 6th, 2009 at 06:25:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It wasn't intended as self-promotion, but for suitable recompense I will make myself available to travel the world breathing my mutable aura onto all currently installed windmills in order to bring them into line.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Feb 6th, 2009 at 07:59:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
no, gemini would be gusty winds, libra mellow breezes, you're better off with aquarius, ruler of alt. energy and the evolution of the air principle, started in mutable gemini, furthered in cardinal libra, and matured to streamlined perfection in fixed aquarius, sign of technology in service to mankind.

or sump'n...

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Fri Feb 6th, 2009 at 01:36:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Psychometrics: Myers-Briggs correlated to DOB ("zodiac") makes for a powerful predictive tool (of "finance").

What is odd to me is how many people I meet are reluctant to admit how often they're subjected to such assessments.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 10:58:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Predictive of what?

Most economists teach a theoretical framework that has been shown to be fundamentally useless. -- James K. Galbraith
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:01:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Future Individual Behavior, given incidences of past behavior(s) among "similarly" characterized individuals, a statistical class. Didn't you read the wiki article, hmmm? You evoked actuarial "science" after all...

Besides, the insurance business model is pricing premium collection to maximize revenue rather than fund replacement costs.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:27:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I evoked actuarial "data" :-)

Most economists teach a theoretical framework that has been shown to be fundamentally useless. -- James K. Galbraith
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:28:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
which is always proprietary :-)

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 12:17:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Is it?  I am not aware of any legislation that states you must not discriminate on the basis of star signs.

I'd be interested in how they are presenting this one and under what legislation in order to rule the advert out of order. unless there is something generic to work with.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 10:57:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
excellent observation (of the law of laws: what is not punished is permitted.)

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:08:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm sure a creative lawyer could make something out of the assorted human rights laws.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:12:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Discrimination on the basis of age.

Most economists teach a theoretical framework that has been shown to be fundamentally useless. -- James K. Galbraith
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:15:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Are you sure you're not a lawyer?

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:42:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Nasty!
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:43:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
IANAL, but I can be creative.

Most economists teach a theoretical framework that has been shown to be fundamentally useless. -- James K. Galbraith
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:54:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Sports league and school might face such a lawsuit any day then ; classes gathered by year of date are discriminatory for those born at the end of the year...

Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères
by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:52:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
that wouldn't work if they hired an aries (or whatever) who was older!

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 02:53:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
-astrological profiling at Customs-
by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 05:57:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
add an extra line to the US visa forms

DS-156

38. IMPORTANT: ALL APPLICANTS MUST READ AND CHECK THE APPROPRIATE BOX FOR EACH ITEM.
A visa may not be issued to persons who are within specific categories defined by law as inadmissible to the United States (except when a waiver is obtained in advance). Is any of the following applicable to you?
  • Have you ever been arrested or convicted for any offense or crime, even though subject of a pardon, amnesty or other similar legal action? Have you ever unlawfully distributed or sold a controlled substance(drug), or been a prostitute or procurer for prostitutes?
Yes No
  • Have you ever been refused admission to the U.S., or been the subject of a deportation hearing or sought to obtain or assist others to obtain a visa, entry into the U.S., or any other U.S. immigration benefit by fraud or willful misrepresentation or other unlawful means? Have you attended a U.S. public elementary school on student (F) status or a public secondary school after November 30, 1996 without reimbursing the school?
Yes No
  • Have you ever violated the terms of a U.S. visa, or been unlawfully present in, or deported from, the United States?
Yes No
  • Have you ever been afflicted with a communicable disease of public health significance or a dangerous physical or mental disorder, or ever been a drug abuser or addict?
Yes No
  • Are you now or have you ever been a Scorpio?
Yes No


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 06:57:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Like Scorpios would ever tell the truth about that.

Sheesh.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Fri Feb 6th, 2009 at 07:13:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
well I suppose it's less likely than International terrorists, and communists

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Feb 6th, 2009 at 10:47:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Merely anecdotal, but the few close male friends I have in the media business are all (presumably) Leos, since we share each others birthday celebrations in the late Finnish summer. I am sure that there are people in the media business born on days throughout the year, but I find it interesting that we should gravitate to each other - essentially, from my point of view, because we share a sense of humour and attitude.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 10:47:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
There are more summer than winter babies, so you'd expect a weighting towards the summer signs.

You wouldn't necessarily expect them all to work in media though. :)

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 10:59:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That I didn't know. I suspect though that  the rapid changes in baby-to-child development and how they synchronize with the seasons - say in Britain - may have an influence on personality.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:54:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You wouldn't necessarily expect them all to work in media though. :)

Or all to be born in the same um seasonally adjusted location.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 12:34:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
which is why african divination or indian astrology would possibly/probably have a different seasonal character-set...

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:41:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I dunno. I've little idea how Chinese, Vidic, and various African or other original cultures divine personality-type. The unstated assumption above is global qualification by N. hemispheric, Julian "seasonality" distinct from observations (or not) of constellations and planetary orbits elsewhere.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 06:59:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
any astrologer worth his sodium will tell you leos and entertainment go hand in hand.

how the mice are playing tonight, lol!

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 02:55:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Just so the mice can play even more...of course we all know that female Virgos are smokers and have Sagittarian partners ...

...this from a recent survey with a sample of two....poemless and solveig...

"The future is already here -- it's just not very evenly distributed" William Gibson

by ChrisCook (cojockathotmaildotcom) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:52:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Male Sagittarian smoker seeking Virgo female smoker with ability to do load calculations, ROI scenarios, and media deconstructing.  Must be able to straddle the gamut from Western Swing to Deep/Funky House.  Owning an airline not a prerequisite, but should be fluent in at least two languages.  Cooking skill optional, but discerning whisky palate to be negotiated.  The Royal We are an equal opportunity whatever, but undulating curves are a mechanical plus.  Must be willing to relocate to the financial axis of offshore windpower capital, if you don't own an airline.  Must be equal to or greater than 27.5 years of age.

Non-Virgo applications gracefully accepted.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 02:56:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah but the description of Virgos from One Word Horroscopes is "Never trust a virgo"

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:10:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
With what?

Come, my friends, 'Tis not too late to seek a newer world.
by poemless on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:18:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think it's general principles, too many Virgos the creators know turned out to be Heroin addicts.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:25:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
oh yes and the rest of the star sign descriptions were similarly complimentary.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:28:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Stop. Just stop. Yer killing me.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:17:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Crazy Horse:
 Must be able to straddle the gamut from Western Swing to Deep/Funky House.

That's not a gamut - it's a medical condition.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:19:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
my dad was a virgo and my mum a sag, they are super good in harness together.

both smoked like turkish chimneys, tho' dad stopped the last 7 years of his life.

that's it, J. is going to kill all our accounts...

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 02:58:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Why not just accept applications from everyone, sort them by birthday, and only call back the Tauruses, etc.?  You could go ahead with your silly strategy and avoid the lawsuit.

That is, if it is silly.  My brother is a Taurus and is very good at sales & management.  Which just makes me think he is evil.  I myself am a Virgo and could not sell something to save my life.  Its awful.  My whole philosophy is, if someone needs something, you should give it to them.  If they don't need it, I'm not going to try make them think they do so I can profit from their insecurity and gullibility.  


Come, my friends, 'Tis not too late to seek a newer world.

by poemless on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 12:01:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I was once told I'd be good at sales. I put it down to being a gemini and a two-faced b.....d

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 12:06:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Maybe they were using a version of Myers-Briggs.

Most economists teach a theoretical framework that has been shown to be fundamentally useless. -- James K. Galbraith
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 12:11:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
What's the name of that 4th form? (~age 11) appitutde test that determines secondary school admission? Key Stage SAT, is it?

haz cheaper cheez than Briggs, I'd say.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 12:42:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There goes my life <slit> ;-)

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 02:46:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
LOL, smartest and funniest comment of the day!

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:00:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Seeing that this is the Torygraph, with its habit of fill-in stories about the "silly Continentals", and given that they won't even name the insurer in the article, I had to track down the original. It's more or less correct, though - ORF brought the story. However, the identity of the astrology-mad company is unknown; what ORF learnt via telephone was only that they are looking for people who'll "sell financial products like insurance".

The result of the on-line vote on the ORF page right now:

29.16%There is some truth in it - if there is demand for a certain character, star sign is important.
58.95%This is nonsense - character and star sign have nothing to do with each other.
11.9%I don't care.

Personally, checking the corresponding dates, I suggest that the company better focus on those born in winter or spring... e.g. those of ideal age within their onetime school classes; and probably those who were over-aged and became leaders in their class. That is, if their statistical sample was of any significant size.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 01:17:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]

found this on Huffpo:

Caption This Photo

German Chancellor Angela Merkel attended the 2009 International Toy Fair yesterday to kick-off the five day event. The Nuremberg-based gathering boasts 2,700 exhibitors from 60 countries, including a toy called the 'Eco-Power Station' pictured here.
by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:06:20 AM EST
maybe our specialists can comment on it.

Helen should be happy, as it has more than three 'wings' or whatever they are called.

Okay, now I am out, still got two yoga classes ahead of me.

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:08:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I was just about to say... which reminds me I haven't caught up with what CH was saying last night yet.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:43:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
1.
Playmobile Security Checkpoint, USD 62.00. Playmobile also sells Police Checkpoint, USD 99.99
Yes, this product line should raise questions about formal practices to manipulate [pun intended] early childhood devlopment.

2. HuffPo yesterday solicited volunteers to read S.336, 431pp version of the House Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, H.R. 1, 647pp. I'd call that a "historic" event in US yellow-sheet publishing.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 01:08:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Context.

They do a whole line of airport stuff. A security checkpoint is at least as salient as a vending machine.

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 01:20:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thank you, Coleman.

They do a whole line of airport stuff.

"Airport stuff" is a "product line." However a product line is not the "context" of early childhood development to which I refer. That would be method of socialization and manipulatives employed to inculcate problem solving strategies (e.g. conflict resolution) and model acceptable behaviors.

" Manipulatives are objects designed to appeal to a child's senses: they can be touched, handled and moved (Yeatts, 1991). Manipulatives have been widely used in early elementary education because they are thought to provide a means of external representation which involves the child in learning, thereby improving performance [read: acceptable behavior(s)]. They concretely represent otherwise abstract numbers, and this external representation is thought to aid children in counting tasks."

A security checkpoint is at least as salient as a vending machine.

You imply, at least, that a security checkpoint is an inanimate feature of airport operations. But of course a security checkpoint is not a commercial feature. Nor is manipulating a vending machine a normative, social requirement per se of passage by public transportation such as an airline or bus.

I believe you are a parent of very young children (infant, toddler?). Before and during travel with your children, how do you explain delays, searches, legitimacy, affective responses, etc of "security checks" to them?

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 01:53:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thank you, Coleman.

Colman. (I noticed you repeatedly made that error.)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:00:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I stand corrected.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:13:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
what do you think of war toys, MT?

do you have a son, or have you raised a boy in a belligerent society?

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:08:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And there's a big tangle of snakes, barbed wire and live wires I've got to figure out shortly.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:19:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
yup, it's one of the sharpest-horned moral dilemnas, amongst so many others around parenting...

i think sweden banned war toys, anyone know?

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:36:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
what do you think of war toys?
Do you have a son or have you raised a boy in a belligerent society?

re: the last question first.

I don't do gender. I'm purposefully raising a human being ("MilitantElectrician," ME) in a belligerent society, i.e. the USA. I permit the ME to read blog contents re: food or food prep and mass media; I permit the ME to search wikis; and I have related ME response to blog threads. The ME is 9 y.o. I have a nephew who is 8 y.o.

re: first question last

I don't teach war. Therefore I do not permit "war toys" or toy war practices. I encourage non-belligerent conflict resolution. That is not to say I discourage demonstrations of anger. Nor is it to say that war toys and practices do not infiltrate the society I want to encourage my child to engage. Certainly DrMarketTrustee had his moments; these were instructive. Certainly the ME has been exposed to the ubiquitous war mores; for example, a hand game learned at soccer camp, where hand/rhyme coordination (think "Miss Mary Mack" and rock-scissors) involve a gun (pointing) and killing (win/loss objective).

My most successful anti-war education strategy has been permitting the ME to view a full year (age 6) of Newshour during which its producers each night named the military dead by rank, age, and origin.

OTOH, I cannot explain how the ME came to the conclusions at an even younger age (i) infinity is not a number; and (ii) I trust myself.

I hope you find this information helpful.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 05:26:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
extremely helpful, i hope you didn't mind me asking.

militant electrician, huh?

i like it

loved the line about infinity too...

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 09:06:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
My point is that they replicate bits of the world with toys: a security checkpoint in this case, a vending machine, a helicopter, a cargo area, whatever. The security scanner is hardly surprising in that context and not worth the pixels that have been wasted on it on blogs on the web (I've seen it several places in the last few weeks) except, maybe, as an opening into what sort of toys we're giving kids and what the effects are. Your phrasing of your point 1 suggests to me an intention by someone to manipulate childhood development via this toy.

As it stands, at ten months, Christopher doesn't need any of that stuff explained to him - he's too busy trying to charm security staff. When he does, I'll try to keep the explanations free of any language that David Letterman wouldn't have been able to air.

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:21:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Your phrasing of your point 1 suggests to me an intention by someone to manipulate childhood development via this toy.

My point is that you and I know better than "they" how you and I prefer to teach our children. You choose manipulative, i.e. toys, for your child even if they are gifts. In institutional settings such as creche/nursey schools you will or will not be interested in what manipulatives "teachers" provide your child to aid concept attainment while you work elsewhere.

When he does, I'll try to keep the explanations free of any language that David Letterman wouldn't have been able to air.

Practice magic much?

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 04:56:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
'so that's what my gang's nemesis looks like!'

will. maintain. facial. muscle. control...

next: toy politicians with solar panels implanted in their heads.

she looked radiant the other day putting the foot in to his holiness, tanned and in a pink outfit that reminded me of the queen muvva.

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:05:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
this morning i just went to the post office (in the USA) to mail a book to my brother in greece and was stunned to learn that the U.S. Postal Service no longer offers surface mail.

apparently this was option was discontinued last May, so i think before the world economic downturn created a shortage of shipping containers.  actually, i don't know if shipping containers had anything to do with u.s. postal mail, but it blows my mind that ALL international mail from the U.S. now has to be flown by plane.  this can't be good for energy efficiency or keeping carbon emissions down, can it?

Truth unfolds in time through a communal process.

by marco on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:18:48 AM EST
I have a stupid question.  Does this mean it goes by boat?  I mean, unless we're talking about Canadia or Mexico and the contiguous Americas.  In fact, I don't think I've ever known of anything other than airmail for delivering regular mail overseas.  I think "Par Avion" was the first foreign phrase I ever learned (forced into pen-palship the moment I could write...).  Of course, I think I've only sent things internationally I can fit into an envelope...  4-12 weeks?  People still wait that long for things?  I don't know.  I suppose for people with families far away, I sympathize.  But really, since most people can get online and get stuff delivered to them, I would think the only things friends and families need to send overseas (I'm not talking about military families, btw) are letters, photos, sentimental items.  If they are too big to send by air, either they are super important or are not and thus can wait.  I mean, if you can wait 12 weeks for something, you can wait until the next time you see someone.  That sounds insensitive.  But I mean, of all the budgetary cuts in the US, I can't get upset about this.  The domestic snailmail itself is practically obsolete.  Between the cost of stamps and the more infrequent delivery.  I guess sending stuff person-to-person in the USPS mail is becoming a kind of romantic indulgence, since so much of it can be done online.  

Come, my friends, 'Tis not too late to seek a newer world.
by poemless on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:50:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Does this mean it goes by boat?

I've never used it, but I assume so.

I actually had a friend ask me once why she couldn't find "ground shipping" as an option on a package being sent to a friend in China.  Took her a few minutes, but she eventually figured it out.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 12:02:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Right.  My instinctual response was to conflate "surface shipping" with "ground shipping."  But seriously, I didn't know anyone but multinational corporations sent stuff by boat.  It just seems so... 19th century.  So... Dracula.

What with the pirates these days, I'd stick with airmail.  

Come, my friends, 'Tis not too late to seek a newer world.

by poemless on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 12:08:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
When I was in the US in August 2005 I ended up with too much weight to fly back. So I had a parcel sent from LA to London, it cost $50. Only problem was it was due to be shipped out via New Orleans, only Katrina happened.  My parcel took the best part of 6 months to arrive.

Still, alongside other stuff, it had all my precious bottles of chilli sauce that I'm still working my way through. After all, how much of a sauce with 257,000 scovilles do you need on your bacon ?

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 12:04:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
more how much of a pig do you need with that sauce.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 01:00:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A sizeable herd I'd imagine.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 01:04:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, surface goes by boat. It usually takes 1-3 months.

It's perfect if you're not in a hurry for something because it's much, much cheaper than air freight.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 12:04:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
When I moved back to the UK from the US, most of my books and other heavy belongings came back by boat.
by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 01:08:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
i've been trying to get even the roughest estimate of what half a container of stuff would cost to ship between and italy (genoa?) to costa rica (Limon?), and google was not helpful at all.

i'll have to retry with kewl.

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:14:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Did you try a note on the riviera section ofangloinfo.com forum perchance? Some one may also want to get a move on.

There are also some Removals companies listed in their directories who might have some experience. Hopefully they have some one else who wants to get another half filled.

Never underestimate their intelligence, always underestimate their knowledge.

Frank Delaney ~ Ireland

by siegestate (siegestate or beyondwarispeace.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:36:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I moved household air freight to UK (38 hr), sea freight back to USA (5 wks); ForEx to USD over 36 mo was the pain point not change in weight of household goods. At this point in time, air and sea freight is a buyer's market, so beware hidden charge scams. Following is a summary of my search.

  1. Inventory precisely household goods.
  2. Declare "personal effects & household goods" for customs duty exemption.
  3. search online local business directory (YourTown.it) or metropolitan phone book; keyword "international mover," "transatlantic shipping," "transatlantic freight forward." Results yield broker or wholly-owned company.
  4. Use phone. Present by fax or mail inventory to prospective (6) brokers to obtain binding, written quote. Charges inclusive: land transfer to port at origin, land transfer from port to destination, bonds and destination customs brokerage (service) fees. Additional: "professional" packing materials and packing services. DIY is perfectly fine; one doesn't normally get to "choose" one's mode < one guaranteed ITU, e.g.ISO standard. So save yourself the trouble of trying to arrange "shared" shipping UNLESS you plan on combining "personal effects & household goods" at a single point of origin/pick-up address.


Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 04:41:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
wow, amazingly helpful, gracias, MT.

MarketTrustee:

So save yourself the trouble of trying to arrange "shared" shipping UNLESS you plan on combining "personal effects & household goods" at a single point of origin/pick-up address.

er, why wouldn't i?

what does '&amp' mean?

:;

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 06:28:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
it's a bail out for the airlines.

:)

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:21:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Digby on the strangely accomodating behaviour of the Obama administration

"I think the administration thought they could be mediators between the two parties rather than leaders of the Democratic party. That just won't work, particularly when the Democrats aren't very good at battling the Republicans in close combat and the Republicans can make those who stay above the fray seem lightweight and insubstantial, which is what they've managed to do. They've showed they don't respect Obama and are unimpressed with his mandate --- the administration needs to accept that and strategize with that in mind."

while Steve at the Left coastertries to work out another angle on the gathering fail

You probably noticed all the GOP talking heads on the weekend chat fests, telling us that tax cuts for lower income Americans and spending for Main Street wouldn't work, while saying with a straight face that Corporate America needed more tax cuts. Did you see any sign of a coordinated counter message from the White House, fighting the GOP on the issues and going after their failed dogma?

Nope, and you won't either. The Obama White House is still delusional in its thinking that by not talking about issues, by not challenging GOP senators, and by continuing to appeal for fuzzy bipartisanship that they'll pull enough GOP senators over to vote for a package that will already be watered down too much with futile and failing gestures to win GOP votes. And it will be a waste of time.

This is the way Obama won the nomination, not on the issues or making a compelling case for a Democratic or progressive counter agenda, but by talking up change, by taking advantage of Clinton's mistakes, and by appealing for "anyone but Hillary." Now that he has to attack on the issues to win, he doesn't know how to, and may not have the skills to do it, because he himself doesn't have the DNA to do it.

I think the natives are getting restless

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 11:57:47 AM EST
I find Obama tries to change the tone.

In recent days, there have been misguided criticisms of this plan that echo the failed theories that helped lead us into this crisis -- the notion that tax cuts alone will solve all our problems; that we can meet our enormous tests with half-steps and piecemeal measures; that we can ignore fundamental challenges such as energy independence and the high cost of health care and still expect our economy and our country to thrive.

This is from an Obama op-ed in the WaPo that has such high traffic that it took half an hour until it downloaded for me.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 01:32:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And Reid now says they have the votes to pass the bill.

See, Barack, a little partisan pressure goes a long way.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:30:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And Nelson must be getting his face ripped off by our side, because he's backing off on his Very Serious cuts.

The package has actually gotten bigger -- over $900bn now.

So this is good.  Pass the stupid thing tonight, go rewrite it in conference, and ram the final bill through.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:54:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Me likeee.  Long overdue ... like 30 years overdue.

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:36:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Those who have forgotten how to shovel snow are doomed to wade through it. - By Anne Applebaum - Slate Magazine
As I say, things look different to people in different places: I've no doubt that in those newly successful societies where folk memory of hardship nevertheless remains--Indonesia, say, or Ghana--plenty of people still fiddle with broken toasters and televisions in their spare time. That's why, when recession hits, they'll be better off than those of us who have forgotten how to shovel snow--or indeed have thrown away the snow shovel altogether.

memo: learn how to 'fix' toasters, (preferably powering them off recycled stationary bikes)

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:47:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Vapid. Turns out that investing in the infrastructure to deal with occasional snowfalls isn't really worth it. That people who never have to drive in snow don't know how. Who knew?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:51:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
My father always reckons that the worst winter driving he ever came across was in.... Norway.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 04:18:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Did your father explain in more detail?
by Solveig (link2ageataol.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 06:00:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
He was working in Norway, and on Landing the BA pilot warned everyone that the weather coming would be dropping a fair ammount of snow, and not to drive if you were going to be on the road after more than an hour. when he got there the people in the factory told him not to worry, as the place where they were hardly ever got serious snow....

When he left that night the road was full of cars stuck in ditches. Whenever it snows and the news is full of stories that Scandinavian countries never have this problem he's always reduced to complaining bitterly to the screen.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 07:43:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
lol...

It tends to be a bit like that when the first snow falls - before drivers adjust to the snow, and maybe have not changed to winter tyres yet.  It can be fun...;-)

by Solveig (link2ageataol.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 09:30:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Shorter Anne Applebaum:  Spoiled Westerners now even worse off than poor people in Ghana.

Come, my friends, 'Tis not too late to seek a newer world.
by poemless on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 04:05:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
yes she's awful, but she got that one right.

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 04:18:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Are you serious?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 04:23:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No she did not.  

It may seem all innocent and enlightened on the surface, but the implications are pure Applemaumian drivel.  Sorry.  I mean, I don't blame you.  It looks right.  And that's her MO, everytime.  At first you are like, yeah, good point.  Then when you think about it for a minute, your are like, damn, that is one intellectually lazy, condescending twit with an agenda!  Gah!  

I should never have read that article.  Now my blood pressure is up and I'm all pissed off all over again.  

Come, my friends, 'Tis not too late to seek a newer world.

by poemless on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 04:27:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Dean Baker: Senators Go Wild!, Approve House Flipping Subsidy, Media Doesn't Notice:

The reporters covering the stimulus have been so busy editorializing against it that they haven't had time to pay attention to what Congress is doing. Last night Congress approved the Isakson amendment which gives $15,000 (or 10 percent of the purchase price, whichever is lower) to every person who buys a home in 2009.

Somehow, Isakson puts the cost of his tax break at just $19 billion. Let's break the Washington rules and try a little arithmetic. Even with weakness in the housing market, it is still virtually certain that we will sell close to 5 million homes in 2009. The overwhelming majority would qualify for the full credit. So, we get 5 million times $15,000. That sounds a lot like $75 billion.

And this is before we get to any gaming. It's hard to see why tens of millions of people wouldn't figure out a way to buy a house from a friend or relative and get their $15k. If we can get one-third of the country's homes to change hands (lots of jobs for realtors) that would be good for $375 billion.

I'm going to go play in the traffic now....

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 12:12:09 PM EST
I'm going to go play in the traffic now....

I think that's part of the stimulus plan: drive half the country to suicide.  Possibly the most effective part of of it, from a purely economics standpoint.  And everyone knows economics has no moral obligations.  Everyone knows you don't stimulate the economy by being ethical or responsible, you do it by giving people loans and credit cards and cash and businesses tax-cuts and cash.  You know.  Like how it was just before we ended up in this mess.  DUH, people!!!

I am so just this close to suggesting my own stimulus plan, in which stupid people get dramatic cuts in political representation.  Of course, that would be unethical.  But economics isn't ethics.  You want an ethics bill, pass an ethics bill.  Don't go using my stimulus bill as a bottomless vessel for your ethics agenda!!

...

Ok.  I feel better now.  Kind of.  Not really...


Come, my friends, 'Tis not too late to seek a newer world.

by poemless on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 12:30:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The lost Letterman episode. This segment of Bill Hicks was never broadcast. Even Letterman is cagey about why he canned it.

Hicks himself had two theories;-
the first was he had a pro-life skit and apparently the pro-life campaign were spending a lot of advertising on letterman. The other was that Letterman didn't like any comedy featuring Jesus, and guess what...

Anyway enjoy.



keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 12:53:10 PM EST
Eh... now we know why Drew loves Bill Hicks...

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 01:43:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That can't have been many months before his death.

Anyway, in light of the Terry Schiavo debacle, his comments about the pro-lifers locking arms before the cemetery seems awfully prescient...

"The basis of optimism is sheer terror" - Oscar Wilde

by NordicStorm (m<-at->sturmbaum.net) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 02:15:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Bill Hicks - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
On October 1, 1993, about five months before his death, Hicks was scheduled to appear on The Late Show with David Letterman, his twelfth appearance on a Letterman late night show (his prior 11 appearances having been on Late Night with David Letterman), but his entire performance was removed from the broadcast - the only occasion, up to that point, in which a comedian's entire routine had been cut after taping. Hicks' stand-up routine was removed from the show allegedly because Letterman and his producer were nervous about Hicks' religious jokes.[8] Both the show's producers and CBS denied responsibility. Hicks expressed his feelings of betrayal in a hand-written, 39-page letter to John Lahr of The New Yorker.[9] Although Letterman later expressed regret at the way Hicks had been handled, he did not appear on the show again. The full account of this incident was featured in a New Yorker profile by Lahr. This profile was later published as a chapter in John Lahr's book, Light Fantastic.[10]


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 02:26:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It wasn't, about 3 months.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 02:26:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
One of the saddest things about Hicks is that his stuff is still relevant, just imagine how he'd have been ripping into Bush & Cheney.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 05:18:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Bush was so far off the scale that I'm not sure. Jon Stewart sitting there speechless with his eyes popping out of his head was all that was needed when the "comedy" was writing itself.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Fri Feb 6th, 2009 at 08:43:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Nice - hadn't seen this before. It's mild for Hicks - but that's just a testament to his professionalism. Know thy audience.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:01:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Nothing in it that we haven't seen elsewhere, but he does look a lot more respectable in that incarnation!
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:03:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
its all a cleaned up version of bits of Rant in E minor

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:15:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That was it.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:18:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Did i understand this right?  16 years after Letterman cut Hicks from his show, he resurrects the clip on his prime time version.  Who was the old lady?  (Hicks' mother?)

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Fri Feb 6th, 2009 at 02:53:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes and yes.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Feb 6th, 2009 at 06:37:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Metro - World's youngest sex change

A teenager who has wanted to be a girl since the age of two has become the youngest person to have a full sex change.

This post should be in green ink cos I am absolutely sick with envy. Transitioning at 16.... {sigh}

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 12:59:36 PM EST
Let it go, the envy. Why be ill, when you may as well feel proud? You did your part. You stood up --to many humiliations I don't doubt-- and still do cherish your self-respect. Standing up counts.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 01:23:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's one of those crosses I have to bear. I don't consume my hours in regret for the life I never led, although I won't deny I did spend a couple of weeks on that at one stage years ago. But I can't help a momentary flashback when I see stories like this.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 02:10:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
you are paving the way for her better world.

let that balance your envy!

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:23:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Heh, maybe. I'm not normally that altruistic but on this occasion ... ;-)))

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:45:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well said, MT.
by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 02:11:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
[Helen's Green-With-Envy™ Technology]

((*Envy name)) without the asterisk.

Most economists teach a theoretical framework that has been shown to be fundamentally useless. -- James K. Galbraith

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Feb 8th, 2009 at 03:23:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC NEWS | England | Humber | Charity swamped over clothes gift

A charity in East Yorkshire has been swamped with calls from across the country asking for clothing donated from residents in Iceland.

A 20ft container filled with clothes arrived in Hull after an Icelandic radio appeal to help pensioners who cannot afford to pay their fuel bills.

Which is the country in trouble...?

"The future is already here -- it's just not very evenly distributed" William Gibson

by ChrisCook (cojockathotmaildotcom) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 01:17:06 PM EST
Well, you know, some of those people don't even have central heating.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 01:25:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
there's no hot springs in yorkshire, squire!

<duh>

seriously, they were prolly shipped while iceland was still just heading for the iceberg.

now they're probably ask for them back!

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:25:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Harrogate used to be a spa town and sometimes still is.

Damn that looks appealing.

I have a friend who works in Harrogate. It may be time for another visit.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 04:05:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
If you Want a taste of Harrogate without visiting.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 04:21:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
i did a visit today, at rapolano terme, near siena.

a whole olympic size pool full of constantly refreshing hot mineral water, no need for chlorine.

air temp made it to 15°C today.

no pampering needed, just mellow lapping for an hour and a half.

took that incipient hip pain away right handily.

can't rec enough.

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 04:25:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I woke up this morning to find approximately 16 forwarded emails from family-- someone in England was doing geneaological research, and it turns out their ancestor was a sibling (that we didn't know about) of our ancestors. I've just gained a bunch of cousins in the UK and am still trying to process it.
by lychee on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 01:29:14 PM EST
lychee:
I've just gained a bunch of cousins in the UK and am still trying to process it.

My commiserations....

"The future is already here -- it's just not very evenly distributed" William Gibson

by ChrisCook (cojockathotmaildotcom) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 01:32:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
(Jokes aside, oh UK person, she does seem nice. And she did a really thorough job of investigating all the name changes that occurred!)
by lychee on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 02:32:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Wow, a number of 1880s births in Liverpool, and some in Wales, too....
by lychee on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 01:40:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well my father came from Liverpool, and his father before him, and they traced their ancestry back to Wales...

...maybe you're my fifth cousin once removed....

"The future is already here -- it's just not very evenly distributed" William Gibson

by ChrisCook (cojockathotmaildotcom) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 02:07:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Everything's relative...

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 02:39:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh c'mon, everyone and their uncle know that!

"The basis of optimism is sheer terror" - Oscar Wilde
by NordicStorm (m<-at->sturmbaum.net) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 02:42:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
i for one, take deep succour and comfort knowing we are all sprung from the furry loins of one tribe of apemen, scratching around the same fire...

cue dave davies

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:28:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
So you and In Wales are......?

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 02:38:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Probably not related. But maybe.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:14:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Probably not related, but as I've held the title of Queen of Coincidences since 1992, you never know. Got any Jewish relatives from a town called Mold?

(From one of the birth certificates: Registration district of Holywell, sub-district of Mold, county of Flint)

by lychee on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:40:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't think so. Or not that I know of. One of my cousins is doing a family tree at the moment so you never know what may pop up.  My Jewish family aren't from Wales.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:58:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh, man, Mold, Flintshire, county Clwyd, is a fine place, just a hop and skip from Manchester and Liverpool to the East, with the gorgeous expanse of North Wales and Snowdonia to the West, and Powys to the South.

It's a unique bit of land and culture. I hope you'll have the opportunity to visit the region, one day.

I'll resurrect a few of the pictures of the region, some of which I've posted previously, and will republish them in this weekend's photoblog.

     

by Loefing on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 07:51:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Liverpool is the capital of North Wales.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:14:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
When the capital of wales was being discussed, and Cardiff was decided on, there was some serious discussion as to making Liverpool the capital of Wales.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Feb 6th, 2009 at 06:42:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Despite not being in Wales and hence becoming known as the capital of North Wales. It entertains me.  Also the fact that Cardiff grabbed the capital crown off Swansea amuses me too.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Feb 6th, 2009 at 10:54:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It should have been Maccynlleth

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Feb 6th, 2009 at 11:41:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
someone in England was doing geneaological research

No, someone's in Switzerland doing physics research.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 02:06:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yarrrrgh......
by lychee on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 02:33:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Just wait 'til they start asking you for money.
by Magnifico on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 02:09:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well that's English relatives for you.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 02:27:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
i thought it was when they started offering you millions you had to watch out.

kornfused in kansas

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:30:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Why are you just standing there?!  Unplug it you Moron!!!!
see more crazy cat pics

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 02:36:37 PM EST
Best one yet.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:06:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't have the broadband to watch this.

Does it have socially redeeming value? humorosity perhaps?

Never underestimate their intelligence, always underestimate their knowledge.

Frank Delaney ~ Ireland

by siegestate (siegestate or beyondwarispeace.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 03:39:29 PM EST
No idea what it is. It crashed my browser and I'll not try twice.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 05:39:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Lots of fun with stats and graphs...a few days old, but I was traveling...hope I'm not repeating anything - it has a lot of slant, and missing some comparative data, but isn't completely out to lunch.

Can The Euro Survive?
... All these challenges are surfacing as the global economy faces the worst year since World War II. I have noted that most economic forecasters are still quite sanguine about the prospects for 2010. Be careful. The models upon which these forecasts are built are based on experience from prior recessions; however, this is no ordinary recession and historical data is therefore largely irrelevant. I am becoming increasingly convinced that most of us are underestimating how long it will take to get the global economy firmly back on its feet again.

Kenneth Rogoff and Carmen Reinhart published a research paper about a month ago which should be mandatory reading for all investors2. They have studied every single banking crisis of the past 100 years and reach some rather unsettling conclusions. As they point out: "Broadly speaking, financial crises are protracted affairs".

Following a banking crisis, asset prices fall more and for longer than most investors realise (see charts 2a and 2b). So do output and unemployment. Most importantly, though, the real value of government debt explodes (see chart 2c) but not for the reasons you might think. Yes, the bailout costs are significant, but the main driver of rising government debt is actually the subsequent collapse of tax income.

Chart 2a: Decline in Real House Prices during Banking Crises



Never underestimate their intelligence, always underestimate their knowledge.

Frank Delaney ~ Ireland

by siegestate (siegestate or beyondwarispeace.com) on Thu Feb 5th, 2009 at 04:08:46 PM EST


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