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Trip to Everest (Photo round-up)

by FarEasterner Wed May 20th, 2009 at 05:37:21 AM EST

It was my dream to look at the highest mountain on this planet called by westerners Everest (after British official) and by locals Qomolungma or Sagarmatha, which in translation mean roughly the same, the Mother Goddess of the Sky. The full text of diary is in Part I, Part II and Part III. Here you can see some photos taken on the journey.




On Durbar square in Kathmandu.

Belorussian guide Yuri who showed me the best and cheap places in Kathmandu.

Nepali army soldiers were marching on the grounds of Ratna Park just opposite of the bus station on the early morning of my departure to Jiri.

Thamel House restaurant, opposite of Anjuna's Newar Momo cafe.

In the evening near Bodhnakht stupa.

In Lumbini.

Horrified goat on the bus station.

My guide Kebi Sherpa.

Pine forest near Jiri.

Pretty Shivalaya.

Having a tea in a teashop on the way to Deurali pass.

The trail was zigzagging steep slopes.

Suspension bridges over streams are far below the trail.

Rushing locals on the way to Kinja.

Heavy bulks of goods carried by Rai porters.

I bribed this Rai child by chocolate to have this wonderful photo.

The first look of Junbesi located in the beautiful valley under looming snows of Numbur.

Mandala on the ceiling of Junbesi gompa.

My first view of Everest in Salung. It's smoking pyramid on the left.

Buddhist stupas dot landscape.

The French couple from Provence.

On Thaksindu pass.

Local girl in Kharikola was beating barley to prepare flour.

Flock of crows on Khari La pass.

Sumptuous lunch of dhal-bhat.

Fabulous forest near Paya.

The first rays of sun dispel yesterday's gloom.

In Surke hanging bells were filling the air with magic sounds.

Namche Bazaar is located in crater on the slope of Khumbi Yul La mountain.

The view from terrace of Japanese hotel in Syangboche.

Celestial Ama Dablam (6856 m).

Children in Mong Selawa where we had a lunch.

The view of Cho Oyu (8188 m) reflecting in the lake.

American couple from San Francisco.

Everest at the top of the ridge opposite of Gokyo Ri mountain.

All glaciers of the world on your palm.

Canadian mountaineer Martin was filling bottles of water through sophisticated filter.

Yaks

The last view of Everest from outskirts of Namche.

In Lukla airport.

Goodbye Himalaya.

Display:
Wonderful pictures!

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Wed May 20th, 2009 at 06:37:36 AM EST
Wow!What an adventure!!!
Photos are more then great!

Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind...Albert Einstein
by vbo on Wed May 20th, 2009 at 07:28:02 AM EST
Great adventure, great pics.

Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.
by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Wed May 20th, 2009 at 10:13:02 AM EST
I got chills looking at these pix.

Truth unfolds in time through a communal process.
by marco on Wed May 20th, 2009 at 12:22:01 PM EST
Superb!
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed May 20th, 2009 at 12:36:43 PM EST
Great Photographs, the picture of Namche Bazaar gives me vertigo.  Thanks for sharing these beautiful shots.

"I said, 'Wait a minute, Chester, You know I'm a peaceful man...'" Robbie Robertson
by NearlyNormal on Wed May 20th, 2009 at 04:50:37 PM EST
Beautiful.  I have a co-worker who goes almost every year.  I think he'll move there when he retires.

Was it confusing talking to Yuri about Jiri?  :)

Bribing kids with chocolate for their photos is adorable.

"Talking nonsense is the sole privilege mankind possesses over the other organisms." -Dostoevsky

by poemless on Wed May 20th, 2009 at 06:39:28 PM EST
It's very difficult life up there, both harsh and inhospitable climate and from material point of view. Everything is very expensive, like in most expensive cities and one needs some commerical property there to survive or [really] millions of dollars to stay there indefinitely.
Actually Yuri and Jiri are differently pronounced ;)
And any kind of bribing I deplore. But children up there did not seem to be spoilt by tourism. They were not begging for any attention or gifts like in many ther places where they were pursuing me with demands for chocolates, pens etc. Himalayan children are usualy very dignified and express genuine surprise for unexpected bonanza.
by FarEasterner on Thu May 21st, 2009 at 02:04:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
those pix are stunning, a dire poco...

i remember meeting some himalayan people when i was in india, on a pilgrimage up a steep, winding, sharp and pointy trail. they were from nepal, and my mind was totally blown by the strength, grace, humility, and ear-to-ear smiles on their faces.

your pix of those packs brought the memory back brilliantly.

these guys were barefoot, and their packs not much shorter than they were!

beautiful comment above about the dignity of children, far easterner.

so glad you shared this wonderful diary, truly sublime landscape and pix that reflect both your sensibilities and the epic nature of your journey.

just incredible...

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu May 21st, 2009 at 02:28:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
thank you for your kind words about Himalayan people. It's interesting thing about them - they recognised me as their own. I think it's more likely for big and numerous nation to adopt "others". that's why actually i don't like to stay in home - in my home people are divided, here they are united.

about pix - well, they don't give justice to reality. but better to have them than not to have them.

by FarEasterner on Thu May 21st, 2009 at 02:42:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
they recognised me as their own.

I suspect this might have had more to do with your generosity of spirit than your appearance or community of origin.

Wonderful and dazzling photos of a trip I could no longer undertake.  Thank you for this.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu May 21st, 2009 at 11:11:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
no it was about my appearance. at home it was always somewhat akward feeling when people would stare at me in bus or in metro. here in asia i found my look quite unsuspicious and whenever I go here, in thailand, nepal or many parts of india (ladakh, sikkim, tibetan communities etc) it is a shock for locals to realize that i am foreigner. some were wondering about links of sakha people with himalayan or thai people. yes, many things are common, even Gesar khan epic, and probably there were more links in the past. but now many my compatriots are happily rediscovering our roots in tibet, nepal or india.
by FarEasterner on Thu May 21st, 2009 at 12:29:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Forgive me for prying, but where is "home"?  I'm guessing this is not a line of inquiry you're wanting to go into.   I suppose I assumed that non-European ethnicities were not so rare in the Russian Far East.  Of course, one can even be in the majority of a local population and still be subjected to all kinds of racism, unfortunately.  

Someone on ET should write a diary on the concept of "home" (where one is from  or currently lives v. where one feels a sense of belonging, etc.).  Seems to be a theme around here.

"Talking nonsense is the sole privilege mankind possesses over the other organisms." -Dostoevsky

by poemless on Thu May 21st, 2009 at 01:10:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
well, home is russia, of course. I stayed for a couple of years in moscow and generally it was ok. there were very cases of discrimination or abuse and i had many many friends of all nationalities. in far eastern city of Yakutsk where i was born situation of course was different, no discrimination at all. in fact after period of trouble in 1990 many ethnic russians and other europeans left this place and much more ethnic minorities moved in. so it became thoroughly asian city where local speech is more often spoken than russian.

the concept of home is good idea. maybe some more experienced writers than I can handle it. I really feel more at home here than in my birthplace, let alone moscow.  

by FarEasterner on Thu May 21st, 2009 at 02:36:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"in far eastern city of Yakutsk where i was born situation of course was different, no discrimination at all. in fact after period of trouble in 1990 many ethnic russians and other europeans left this place and much more ethnic minorities moved in. so it became thoroughly asian city where local speech is more often spoken than russian."

And this is what I'd assumed (I indeed have an ethnic Russian friend who left that area around that time.)  But you still felt uncomfortable there?  

"Talking nonsense is the sole privilege mankind possesses over the other organisms." -Dostoevsky

by poemless on Thu May 21st, 2009 at 02:49:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
yes and no. it's difficult to say as i have not been in russia continuously for almost 4 years now. my family wants me to return but i drag my feet. (i wanted to say prevaricate however i am not sure about meaning of this word).
i don't think i will have problems in my town, it's possible only in european russia where there are many street gangs and some even with racist agenda.
i am actually afraid of life in yakutsk, it's a small place of 200 thousand people and there are not many interesting people around whom i can talk to. here in india or maybe later in south east asia (if i move there) i find many more interesting people. not only from the first world but also (and mainly) locals.
by FarEasterner on Thu May 21st, 2009 at 03:35:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
sorry, read as this "there were very few cases of discrimination or abuse and I had many...".
by FarEasterner on Thu May 21st, 2009 at 03:25:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Beautiful pictures. Namche Bazaar... I've dreamed of passing through that place. Perhaps some day. Your pictures make me want to go there now.

You have a normal feeling for a moment, then it passes. --More--
by tzt (tzt) on Thu May 21st, 2009 at 06:09:39 PM EST
I agree with tzt, I want to go there!  Thanks for such wonderful pictures.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu May 28th, 2009 at 11:12:48 AM EST
Thank you for those refreshing views... That took me back through "Memory Lane".. I've been there, as in Kashmir, but had then the age of the kids in your pictures !

Seems it hasn't changed much :-)

"What can I do, What can I write, Against the fall of Night". A.E. Housman

by margouillat (hemidactylus(dot)frenatus(at)wanadoo(dot)fr) on Thu May 28th, 2009 at 01:58:23 PM EST


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