Welcome to the new version of European Tribune. It's just a new layout, so everything should work as before - please report bugs here.

Wednesday Open Thread

by Nomad Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 10:51:30 AM EST

A place to hang out.


Display:
Like Water for Money | Steven Strogatz (Guest Columnist) | The Wild Side - Olivia Judson | New York Times
... Unfortunately, we have poor intuition about such complex systems. And yet we have to come to grips with them if we ever hope to understand, with mathematical precision, such issues as cancer, climate change and, yes, the workings of the real economy. All of these are obviously far more complicated than Phillips's cartoonish caricature, with its mere handful of pipes and valves, but still, the family resemblance is unmistakable.

In an earlier time scientists were content to break problems into smaller and smaller pieces and study the individual parts. Reductionism, as the strategy is known, makes good sense. The hope was always that once you figured out how the components behave, it should be possible to put them back together to make sense of the original ensemble. But only rarely has this dream come to fruition, and in too many cases reductionism became an end in itself. ...

See it in action, click on the above image, or here is another YouTube video:



Truth unfolds in time through a communal process.

by marco on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 10:54:29 AM EST
hasn't someone produced a software version of this device so we can all have a play?

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 01:34:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The hardware version used to be on public view in the Science Museum.

I have a suspicion it used to leak.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 02:12:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The computer model that once explained the British economy | Business | The Guardian
McRobie was given a grant from Nesta - the National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts - and spent a summer on the restoration project. The only difference with the original is that McRobie has dispensed with the cochineal because it would stain the Perspex. "Everything was in the wrong place. It had been here since the 1950s but everything was connected wrong. I had to work out what he was trying to do. Economics is run by people who didn't understand it."

(my bold)

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Jun 4th, 2009 at 06:03:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
One of the economists who used one for Harold Wilson's govt wrote an article in the Guardian about it. He said they swore by it, but it began to come up with answers about the value of Sterling that Wilson didn't want to hear. He was campaigning about the value of the "pound in your pocket".

The economist said that it was at that point that the machine fell out of favour and the UK economy had a crisis.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 02:23:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I do remember film on the news in my childhood of it working.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 02:36:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It is a hydraulic analog computer.  I see no reason why it could not be duplicated as an electronic analog computer or as a digital economic model.  Bart Locanthi of JBL long ago came up with an electronic analog computer that accurately simulated the sort of electro acoustic circuits that speakers form in sealed or vented boxes.

The real problem would probably lie in updating the model to accommodate the international nature of corporations and the fragmented regulatory structure of the current situation.  Such an attempt would likely reveal several interesting problems, including vulnerability to positive feedback resulting in crashes due to unsustainable demands.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 03:16:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's not doing anything complicated/

It would only take a day or two to code this in Flash with some cool graphics and a comedy music bed.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 05:54:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
How to flush, or reset?
by das monde on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 10:24:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Östhammar wins bid to store nuclear waste
Online: http://www.thelocal.se/19852/20090603/

The eastern Swedish town of Östhammar has seen off rival bidder Oskarshamn and secured a lucrative deal to store nuclear waste for the next 100,000 years, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) said in a statement on Wednesday.

Plans call for all the spent nuclear fuel from Swedish nuclear power plants to be deposited in a repository at a depth of nearly 500 metres underground in the crystalline bedrock.

The Östhammar site is located near the Forsmark nuclear facility and was chosen in part because rock at the level where the spent nuclear fuel will be stored is dry and relatively free of fractures.

"The selection of a site is a milestone for the Swedish nuclear waste programme. We see a clear advantage for Forsmark concerning long-term safety", said SKB President Claes Thegerström in a statement.

In addition, placing the underground storage facility at Forsmark will require less space, meaning less rock will need to be excavated.

The next step for SKB is to begin the process of applying for permits to be reviewed by the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority and the Environmental Court.

"We are now focusing our work on putting together the necessary documentation to submit a licence application for constructing a safe repository for nuclear fuel in Forsmark," said Thegerström.

The company expects to have its applications submitted sometime in 2010.

This site is located 65 km from my home, so we're kinda celebrating. :)

There's always been an undercurrent in the (international) nuclear waste debate about "bribing" communities to accept the spent fuel, and indeed the winner here will get 50 million euros. But the funny thing is that the losing community will get 150 million. Yes, we have to bribe people not to take the stuff...

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.

by Starvid on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 12:31:04 PM EST


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 12:47:55 PM EST
As powerful as the infamous "daisy" advert, but it connects past experience to hope for the future through easily achievable action.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 12:57:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Hey! 0:32 to 0:35 in -- aint't that Helen?

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 01:15:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
How can I tell ? I still can't view embedded vids.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 01:23:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's on YouTube, link.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 01:27:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
In the green T-shirt ?? Get out of here.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 01:42:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
LOL

The brainless should not be in banking. — Willem Buitler
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 04:17:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC NEWS | Politics | Brown pressure after Blears quits

Communities Secretary Hazel Blears has quit the cabinet, increasing pressure on UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown.

Her departure is the second top-level resignation on the eve of the European and English local elections.

It led to stormy Commons scenes as Mr Brown denied his government was in "meltdown" and rejected calls for an immediate general election.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 12:53:09 PM EST
Guardian | Gordon Brown: Labour's dilemma

Gordon Brown talks much about his Presbyterian past, but he has a story to tell - about personal morality, a sense of justice and a belief in the power of politics that does, at its best, appeal to the "better angels of our nature", as he put it on his first day in Downing Street. The nation needs someone who answers this description to lead it now, just as Labour needs to find someone who is able to set out a case for progressive government. Political reform can no longer be put aside as an abstract idea, of appeal to dreamers but not to voters who face the harder realities of life. The public is calling furiously for a better system. People want an honest parliament. They want leaders who are prepared to act. They loathe the old system, and many of the people who are part of it.

The tragedy for Mr Brown and his party is that his chance to change it has gone. Although he still purports to be a radical, he has adopted the caution of an establishment man. He cannot lead a revolution against his own way of doing government, and yet a revolution is necessary. Grandstanding on his claims to good intentions, the prime minister demands the right to carry on, even as the cabinet implodes around him. The home secretary, the chancellor, and perhaps even the foreign secretary may go, and Labour faces its worst defeat in its history on Thursday, but the prime minister does not recognise his direct responsibility for the mayhem.

The truth is that there is no vision from him, no plan, no argument for the future and no support. The public see it. His party sees it. The cabinet must see it too, although they are not yet bold enough to say so. The prime minister demands loyalty, but that has become too much to ask of a party, and a country, that was never given the chance to vote for him. Had there been a contest for the leadership in 2007 - and had Mr Brown called a general election - he would probably have won. He decided not to do these things. And he has largely failed since.

The truth of the matter is that all of these calls for Brown's resignation are idiotic.  Anyone intelligent enough to make for a good PM will be intelligent enough not to seek it now with less than a year to the election.

Labour is going to lose the next general election.  Throwing out Brown would most likely only ensure an even greater massacre, perhaps putting an end to the party as a major force altogether (not that Labour and its voters wouldn't richly deserve it).

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 03:49:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
At Dodo's suggestion i have written a diary on this

but the story is moving fast. I could be proved entirely worng by tomorrow.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 05:38:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
British hostage Edwin Dyer 'killed by al-Qaida'

Apparently he was kidnapped amongst a group of tourists visiting a famous Tuareg music festival in Mali that has attracted a lot of attention as being a favourite of many western musicisans, Robert Plant among them. I nearly went myself 18 months ago and if my financial plans hadn't gone awry, I might have been among that group earlier this year. I only threw the brochure away a couple of weeks back.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 01:22:36 PM EST
The alpha ventus wind farm is the first far-from-shore off-shore wind farm in the North Sea off the German territorial waters. In the initial phase (this summer or early autumn), it will consist of six 5MW Multibrid M5000 units (soon to be followed by another six of the rival REpower 5M). Today, the last of the fundaments was plaed on the sea bottom.




*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 01:24:11 PM EST
BTW. Was this posted on ET yet?

Wow. I missed Spain tripling new installations a second time. But, the news that got me to check this -- in the form of an off-hand half-sentence on the German PV market -- is that this year, the Spanish market collapsed?

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 01:47:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
An unnamed US statesman as quoted in Haaretz:

"The Israelis want us to commit to oral understandings we have never heard about, but at the same time they are not willing to commit to written agreements their government has signed, like the road map and commitment to the two-state solution."

says it all really

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 01:36:44 PM EST
Ynet News | Rightists to circulate doctored photos of kaffiyah-clad Obama

Doctored photos of US President Barack Obama wearing a kaffiyah (traditional Arab headdress) with a caption reading "Jew-hating anti-Semite" will be circulated in the coming days by Israeli right-wing activists in protest of the growing US pressure on Israel  to halt settlement activity, even that which is attributed to "natural growth."

The activists, Ynet has learned, plan to circulate another doctored photo showing Obama shaking hands with Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad against the backdrop of a nuclear explosion. The heading reads "Yes, We Can."

The photos may be distributed in the US as well.

On Wednesday some 200 right-wing activists held a demonstration outside the American Consulate in Jerusalem under the banner, "Obama, no! No you can't!"

Ah, the Middle East and its fine, fine people.

Still having trouble figuring out why we bother with any of these people.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 04:03:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
caption reading "Jew-hating anti-Semite"

...adding: Is this as opposed to all of the Jew-loving anti-Semites?

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 04:08:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yea, palestinians and jews do seem physiognomically similar. Methinks they have common ancestors about ... 1950 years ago.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 04:37:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Air France 447 - AFR447 - A detailed meteorological analysis - Satellite and weather data

Air France flight 447 (AF447), an Airbus A330 widebody jet, was reported missing in the equatorial Atlantic Ocean in the early morning hours of June 1, 2009. The plane was enroute from Rio de Janeiro (SBGL) to Paris (LFPG). Speculation suggested that the plane may have flown into a thunderstorm. The objective of this study was to isolate the aircraft's location against high-resolution satellite images from GOES-10 to identify any association with thunderstorm activity. Breakup of a plane at higher altitudes in a thunderstorm is not unprecedented; Northwest Flight 705 in 1963 and more recently Pulkovo Aviation Flight 612 in 2006 are clear examples.

Back in the 1990s I did flight route forecasting for the Air Force. One of my assignments in summer 1994 was forecasting was the sector between Mombasa, Kenya and Cairo, Egypt for C-5 and C-141 aircraft. The Sudan region had tropical MCS activity similar to this with little in the way of sensor data, so this incident holds some special interest for me as one of our C-5s could easily have followed a very similar fate. Using what's available to me I decided to do a little analysis and see if I could determine anything about the fate of AF447 and maybe through some circuitous, indirect means help give authorities some clues on where to look.

Can't say I understand all of it, but the fact that this sort of analysis is possible, and the almost instantaneous information sharing via informed comments that follows, is what makes me optimistic for the future.

"The future is already here -- it's just not very evenly distributed" William Gibson

by ChrisCook (cojockathotmaildotcom) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 01:43:32 PM EST
from Lightning Wiki

Positive lightning, also known colloquially as "bolts from the blue", makes up less than 5% of all lightning. It occurs when the leader forms at the positively charged cloud tops, with the consequence that a negatively charged streamer issues from the ground. The overall effect is a discharge of positive charges to the ground.

Research carried out after the discovery of positive lightning in the 1970s showed that positive lightning bolts are typically six to ten times more powerful than negative bolts, last around ten times longer, and can strike tens of kilometres/miles from the clouds.

The voltage difference for positive lightning must be considerably higher, due to the tens of thousands of additional metres/feet the strike must travel. During a positive lightning strike, huge quantities of ELF and VLF radio waves are generated

As a result of their greater power, positive lightning strikes are considerably more dangerous. At the present time, aircraft are not designed to withstand such strikes, since their existence was unknown at the time standards were set, and the dangers unappreciated until the destruction of a glider in 1999.



keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 02:03:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Obama goes to enjoy the hospitality of a particularly nasty arabic dictator to make a speech in which he'll attempt to convince ordinary muslim people that he's on their side.

Talk is good, walk is better methinks.

But how can you talk to ordinary muslims by addressing some "muslim street" ? What's the "christian street" ? Wouldn't we in the west feel patronised if some war mongering foreigner who openly supports our most villanous governments and a spoke to us all as Xtians from Italy or Latvia ?

It's like our pols always talking about looking for the "community leaders" amongst 2nd or 3rd generation immigrant populations. I don't have a community leader, I don't know anyone who has. And funnily enough we don't look for community leaders amongst our Polish friends who have lately been so industrious on our behalf. So why do we assume that asians have community leaders. Are we sub-consciously asking for Tribal chieftains ? A racist asusmption that these people are actually a bit primitive.

And oddly, I'm sure many people in the middle East have radios, some might even have televisions !! So why does he have to go to cairo to show his "sincerity" when actually that veyr location undermines the message he hopes to put across.

all of which is not to slag off Obama or his intentions. It's more a case of an exasperated "get a clue, for chrissakes"


keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 01:54:18 PM EST
McClatchy: Egyptians worry that Obama will inadvertently bless repression

Cairo prepares to welcome President Barack Obama on Thursday, when he's scheduled to deliver a major speech to the Arab world, politicians such as Nour are growing increasingly concerned that Obama will sacrifice democratic reforms in Egypt to shore up Mubarak in pursuit of the American president's broader Middle East agenda.
by Magnifico on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 04:30:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"Inadvertently".

Hope springs eternal...

The brainless should not be in banking. — Willem Buitler

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 04:32:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Agreed and disagreed.  I think it's wise, if obvious to any sane person, to try to fight the perception that the American presence is not -- or at least isn't anymore -- any kind of Crusade against Islam.  Certainly I don't think you'd find people like bin Laden attacking him if they didn't believe he might have some success.

I suspect if roles were reversed, and some overwhelmingly Muslim country were occupying Texas (there's an image for ya), talk of the "Christian street" wouldn't be wholly ridiculous in that I think it means trying to get in touch with the typical person on the street.  In this hypothetical situation, is there really any doubt that a Muslim occupier would be identified as such?  That was, after all, an obvious point to make when discussing how people over there might perceive us.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 06:52:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
La face cachée de la lune. Anyone else seen this brilliant French-Canadian movie?

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 02:42:06 PM EST
Unfortunately, no: it was one I wanted to watch when it was new, but missed when it arrived in the cinemas here.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 03:18:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
(IOW: just added to my list of films to be downloaded as torrent...)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 03:19:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It should be prescribed viewing before any debate about religion ;-)

I found it utterly absorbing and the coups de theatre exploded into all kinds of thoughts.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 03:42:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BTW DoDo. Have you seen the Israeli movie 'Beaufort'?

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Jun 4th, 2009 at 06:52:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Interesting little tit-bit from someone reasonably well informed.


If Latvia defaults, then of course there will be a Domino effect, but I am not sure as to where it will spread. Russia looks quite strong, Ukraine looks terrible. Austria and Sweden? They will undoubtedly be horribly affected.

Also look out for June 7th. This is when Ukraine will have to pay Russia for gas. Some fireworks may take place there (last two months were paid by a barter: Russia provided gas to Ukraine in return for transportation costs until well into 2010.

This month, the Russians are asking for hard currency payments for their gas. Ukraine will probably be able to pay, but it will be very painful. They have desperately tried to borrow extra cash from Russia or EU, but the Russians have politely told them to go back to bed with the EU, whilst the EU sees no reason as to why it should bail Ukraine out.

At some stage, this will reach some conclusion and Ukraine will collapse like Latvia. Ukraine has been holding on by carrying out regulatory measures which would make Chairman Mao proud. (advice to Latvia: pass a regulation which forces all bank reserves to be in local currency. Short term result: huge increase in demand for local currencies. Long term result: all the banks will have a huge local currency exposure. That is what the Ukrainians did and it worked for this month.)



"The future is already here -- it's just not very evenly distributed" William Gibson
by ChrisCook (cojockathotmaildotcom) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 02:51:23 PM EST


The brainless should not be in banking. — Willem Buitler
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 03:00:04 PM EST
edbr

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 03:20:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9tzga6qAaBA

The brainless should not be in banking. — Willem Buitler
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 03:55:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
thanks. Hmm, that's not the sort of job yer average careers advisor comes up with

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 04:39:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I know someone who got two O-levels, woodwork and religious knowledge. Careers adviser asked if he'd ever considered being an undertaker.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Jun 4th, 2009 at 06:10:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
When I was about eight I discovered the joy of inserting "bobbie pins", or 2" long two sided hair clips, into 115 VAC sockets.  I would strip back the insulation on the ends with my teeth, insert one side with my fingers and then use something insulated to get the other side to slip in.  Then I got to watch the pin get red hot and break.  Lucky I didn't kill myself or burn down the house.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 04:46:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I was driven by some madness to remove a light bulb from its socket and replace it with a quarter.  I was about 7.  My parents were not happy when all the power went out in the middle of their dinner party.  I was both terrified and filled with an exciting sense of power.  Kids dig electricity.

"Pretending that you already know the answer when you don't is not actually very helpful." ~Migeru.
by poemless on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 04:53:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]

what passes as opinion on the IHT

Does the California case sound familiar to Europeans? It should. Political dysfunction, out-of-control public spending and budget deficits, an inability to devalue the currency to meet the crisis, weak politicians looking for bailouts, all are part of the current European landscape. California even has a "European" as its chief executive.



In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 03:50:20 PM EST
WTF?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 03:52:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
California is French!

The brainless should not be in banking. — Willem Buitler
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 03:53:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
California makes wine. France makes wine. Therefore California equals France.
by Magnifico on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 04:28:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
They use all those French grape varieties, too.

The brainless should not be in banking. — Willem Buitler
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 04:29:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The quoted author is from The Hoover Foundation at Stanford.  Nuf said.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 04:49:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
ROFL

The brainless should not be in banking. — Willem Buitler
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 03:53:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
DEH PEEPEL UV GULLYVORNYAH WEEL NOT STAND FUH DEES COMPEHREESONS, JAY!!

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 04:06:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Op-Ed Contributor - Europe's Advantage - NYTimes.com
Mel Krauss is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution

Same old song.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 04:36:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]


In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 04:09:12 PM EST
The picture is a photoshop from Fark. The base image is from a 2000 Smithsonian display: "A full-scale display of a typical nuclear-powered submarine's maneuvering room in which the ship's engineers control the power plant and electrical and steam systems."

See Snopes: Does Not Computer.

by Magnifico on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 04:24:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, I don't think the concept of home computers occured to anybody till the altair 8800.

In films computers were big things with computer tapes and punch card readers and gangs of technicians ministering to them.

but it's an intersting idea, when did anybody seriously begin to imagine a computer in every office, let alone every home. I'd bet it was application rather than hardware driven; spreadsheets for offices, WP for home.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 04:43:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It first became possible in 1971 with the first single chip microprocessor, the Intel 4004 with a 4-bit processor utilizing 2,300 silicon gated metal oxide semiconductor transistors on a 2x3 mm chip.

I actually saw this chip in Intel PDSs in '71 or 72, but my interests lay in audio console automation and I didn't appreciate the general purpose potential the computer itself could have.  And I have always been a dufus with software.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 05:08:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 05:58:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Not bad.

The brainless should not be in banking. — Willem Buitler
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 06:03:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Bleedin' Commies!

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 06:20:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
What is best in life?
To crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and to hear the lamentation of their women.
(according to Conan (as played by Arnold Schwarzenegger) in the 1982 film Conan the Barbarian)


The brainless should not be in banking. — Willem Buitler
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 04:13:13 PM EST
(David) Cameron the Barbarian should be feeling very pleased then.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 04:34:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The current? page from scroogle.org scraper is not as funny as usual.

http://www.scroogle.org/cgi-bin/scraper.htm

Is there a credible defense for goog?  

Our knowledge has surpassed our wisdom. -Charu Saxena.

by metavision on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 05:20:10 PM EST


Display:
Go to: [ European Tribune Homepage : Top of page : Top of comments ]