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Exhibit 165

by Cat Sat Sep 19th, 2009 at 04:07:09 PM EST

Jimmy came out of the Deep South. He had a sense of the agricultural epoch. Then he came and worked in the plant and had a sense of the industrial epoch. And then he watched automation, what we called automation takeover, remove the necessity of work from our well-being. And he saw that we're moving into a jobless world and that we had to redefine ourselves as human beings. And that's what American revolution is all about: redefining ourselves as human beings, because we have benefited from damning the rest of the world to underdevelopment.
-- Grace Lee Boggs, 18 Sep 2009

Following are excerpts from a job application form, provided by the US retailer CVS. The excerpts demonstrate in part how one might define oneself as a human being, how automated communication applications qualify and evaluate selected characteristics of human being, and  how employers approve applicants for minimum wage, low-skill employment according to an applicant's responses to the survey. More important, the excerpts demonstrate one method of reporting primary research data or micro-economic inputs that underlie econometric decompositions of statistical inferences.

I, being one, would like to find more such facts in the blogs' commentaries on macroeconomic theory, governments' statutues, and partisans' purported public policies.


Self-service
The form is available by internet and same-store locations, where CVS management has installed a collection device for "walk-in" applicants. The application is a multipage document, branching in which discriminates applicants by state jurisdiction of residence and labor law. In addition, the form screens applicants by their responses to criminal conviction and federal- and state-funded transfer receipts. Applicant responses are required to proceed to completion of personal qualifications for an unspecified vacancy.

The form requires approximately 30 minutes or more to complete. In fact, the internet service permits applicants to suspend/resume processing over a 72-hr period, but the kiosk service does not. This reporter did not encounter a live moderator or directions to a live moderator at any of the three kiosks sampled. Further, the internet application service (ASP) did not qualify repeat application submission by cross-reference to unique identifiers such as social security number AND residential address, also collected by same-store kiosk service.

Categorical Job Descriptions
The CVS applicant must select one of these five descriptions in order to complete and submit the form. One should note, in practice, functional fluidity.

"Customer Service: Responsible for customer service, cash handling, merchandising activities, light maintenance and any additional tasks specific to each position.

Beauty Advisor: Responsible for meeting or exceeding Beauty department sales and service targets and building a loyal customer base through outstanding customer service.

Photo Lab: Responsible for customer service, photo finishing, cash handling and general equipment maintenance.

Shift Supervisor: Responsible for customer service, employee supervision, cash handling and merchandising activities.

Pharmacy Technician: Our Service Associates are responsible for ringing out prescriptions, answering telephones, and pharmacist referrals. Our Certified Technicians are responsible for customer service and prescription order processing, as well as problem resolution and inventory management."

Below are statements about many attitudes and experiences. Read each one and select the answer that best describes you. Work quickly--choose the answer that comes to mind first."

Survey or Questionnaire
The following is excerpt from a "20-page"  section to qualify a "Customer Service" job applicant. No page breaks are represented here. Applicants may escape a questionnaire page only by emending previous page responses. This section of the form proceeds from intake of previous employment history AND applicant's selection of categorical job description. In this case, selection is CUSTOMER SERVICE. This reporter has not tested other categorical job description descendents.

















You say whatever is on your mindStrongly disagree
[ ]

Disagree
[ ]

Agree
[ ]
Strongly agree
[ ]
You get angry more often than nervousStrongly disagree
[ ]

Disagree
[ ]

Agree
[ ]
Strongly agree
[ ]
You have confidence in yourselfStrongly disagree
[ ]

Disagree
[ ]

Agree
[ ]
Strongly agree
[ ]
There are some people you really can't standStrongly disagree
[ ]

Disagree
[ ]

Agree
[ ]
Strongly agree
[ ]
People do a lot of things that make you angryStrongly disagree
[ ]

Disagree
[ ]

Agree
[ ]
Strongly agree
[ ]
Right now, you care more about having fun than being serious at school or workStrongly disagree
[ ]

Disagree
[ ]

Agree
[ ]
Strongly agree
[ ]
It bothers you a long time when someone is unfair to youStrongly disagree
[ ]

Disagree
[ ]

Agree
[ ]
Strongly agree
[ ]
You agree with people more than you argueStrongly disagree
[ ]

Disagree
[ ]

Agree
[ ]
Strongly agree
[ ]
When people make mistakes, you correct themStrongly disagree
[ ]

Disagree
[ ]

Agree
[ ]
Strongly agree
[ ]
You swear when you argueStrongly disagree
[ ]

Disagree
[ ]

Agree
[ ]
Strongly agree
[ ]
People who talk all the time are annoyingStrongly disagree
[ ]

Disagree
[ ]

Agree
[ ]
Strongly agree
[ ]
There's no use having close friends; they always let you downStrongly disagree
[ ]

Disagree
[ ]

Agree
[ ]
Strongly agree
[ ]
It bothers you when you have to obey a lot of rulesStrongly disagree
[ ]

Disagree
[ ]

Agree
[ ]
Strongly agree
[ ]
You have no big worriesStrongly disagree
[ ]

Disagree
[ ]

Agree
[ ]
Strongly agree
[ ]
You were absent very few days from high schoolStrongly disagree
[ ]

Disagree
[ ]

Agree
[ ]
Strongly agree
[ ]
It's fun to go out to events with big crowdsStrongly disagree
[ ]

Disagree
[ ]

Agree
[ ]
Strongly agree
[ ]
Your stuff is often kind of messyStrongly disagree
[ ]

Disagree
[ ]

Agree
[ ]
Strongly agree
[ ]
You'd rather not compete very muchStrongly disagree
[ ]

Disagree
[ ]

Agree
[ ]
Strongly agree
[ ]
You do not fake being politeStrongly disagree
[ ]

Disagree
[ ]

Agree
[ ]
Strongly agree
[ ]

Addendum
When you are annoyed with something, you say so
Your friends and family approve of the things you do
You have to give up on some things that you start
You avoid arguments as much as possible
People do a lot of annoying things
It is maddening when the court lets guilty criminals go free
You hate to give up if you can't solve a hard problem
You know when someone is in a bad mood, even if they don't show it
You can wait patiently for a long time
You are unsure of what to say when you meet someone
You like to take frequent breaks when working on something difficult
You finish your work no matter what
You look back and feel bad about things you've done
You ignore people you don't like
You don't believe a lot of what people say
You keep calm when under stress
You got mostly good grades in high school
You don't act polite when you don't want to
You show it when you are in a bad mood
You ignore people's small mistakes
Your moods are steady from day to day
When your friends need help, they call you first
You don't care what people think of you
When you go someplace, you are never late
You get mad at yourself when you make mistakes
You are always cheerful
You make more sensible choices than careless ones
You are unsure of yourself with new people
You give direct criticism when you need to
You are careful not to offend people
Slow people make you impatient
You would rather work on a team than by yourself
It is easy for you to feel what others are feeling
People are often mean to you
You do not like small talk
You've done your share of troublemaking
Any trouble you have is your own fault
You are a friendly person
You do what you want, no matter what others think
It is hard to really care about work when the job is boring
You have friends, but don't like them to be too close
When you are done with your work, you look for more to do
You criticize people when they deserve it
You sometimes thought seriously about quitting high school
You do not like to meet new people
You are not afraid to tell someone off
You try to sense what others are thinking and feeling
You don't work too hard because it doesn't pay off anyway
You do things carefully so you don't make mistakes
You could not deal with difficult people all day
You do not like to take orders
You rarely act without thinking
People's feelings are sometimes hurt by what you say
You are somewhat of a thrill-seeker

Exit Remark
"Thank you for applying at CVS/pharmacy. Should your qualifications match one of our open positions, a store representative will review your application and contact you. Your application will remain active and on file for 365 days".

Display:
Personality profiling, What do you know about method and resulting effects on selection and retention? Here are two reactions to a CR post relating JOLTS data to a NYT column by David Leonhardt."Try thinking of it [tandem rising average wages and rate of unemployment] this way: All of the unemployed people in the country are gathered in a huge gymnasium that's been turned into a job search center."

 dryfly (profile)  wrote on Sat, 9/19/2009 - 8:34 am
The point CR makes that wages for those working can go up even though the unemployment is high is very much 'right on'... and it isn't new and it isn't all gov't regulations. A lot of it is a result of 'skill trap'... what you know how to do can't easily be transferred to another high paying job... think of it this way - how many mortgage securitization geeks are prepared to quickly transition to become a pertochemical engineer? They both took plenty of math but is that enough - even if they wanted to trade in that Italian suit for hard hat & steel toes?

Even happens in labor - back in the stagflation 70s I had a job working on a maintenance crew on a factory floor - mostly I was a gofer & helper & shoveled machining chips away so the experienced maintenance guys could get access [I was only 20 at the time]... UE around that time was 10% and yet I was getting paid $10/hr BACK THEN... lotsa people applied for those jobs but HR only looked at those folks who came from a factory background - family & personal experience - I had both. There were a lot of very disappointed people, some with families who needed the money worse than I did - but they just couldn't make a credible case they were factory floor material. That they would stick it out & put up with the crap - a factory floor back then was NOT a comfy office [they are better now - mostly].

I think a lot of that goes on in a recession like this - it traps folks into that 'gymnasium'. I am not sure how you get them out.

 js esq. (profile)  wrote on Sat, 9/19/2009 - 8:38 am
I'm one of the people who is in the gym. I lost my job in March. I was working for one the largest, most prestigious corporate law firms until the axe fell.

I'm in DC, so the major industry is government. I was in a regulatory practice group, and one that is ostensibly a "hot" field right now. I've applied to at least 80 positions since being laid off, but the competition is fierce. You always hear those statistics about their being 5 or 6 unemployed people for every job opening, right? I don't know what they're smoking. Even 1 year, ARRA*-funded positions are getting 150 applications. Full time lawyer positions in the federal government are averaging 300-500 applicants right now.

I've made the final three candidates on two separate occasions, but have yet to break through and secure an actual job. I recently applied for an entry level, GS-11, Step 1 position. It pays 1/3 of what I made in private practice. I'm over qualified for it. And yet, I have little hope that I'll actually get it.

I'm very lucky because my wife has a great job with a large consulting firm. If it wasn't for her, I don't know what I would do.

* American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, aka the Stimulus bill

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Sat Sep 19th, 2009 at 09:37:05 PM EST
Calculated Risk: Leonhardt: Wages Grow for Those With Jobs
The following graph shows hires (Green Line), Quits (blue bars) and Layoff, Discharges and other (red bars) from the JOLTS. Red and blue added together equals total separations. Unfortunately this is a new series and only started in December 2000.


Click on graph for larger image.


Notice that hires (green line) and separations (red and blue together) are pretty close each month. When the green line is above total separations, the economy is adding net jobs, when the green line is below total separations, the economy is losing net jobs.


"Dieu se rit des hommes qui se plaignent des conséquences alors qu'ils en chérissent les causes" Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet
by Melanchthon on Sun Sep 20th, 2009 at 10:13:03 AM EST
Better jobs for fewer people while population continues to increase?

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Sep 20th, 2009 at 10:15:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Have to compute the the mode and median of the data to really get a handle on it.

The upper 10% has a greater affect on the arithmetical "average" than the bottom 10% because income is asymmetrical, skewing the arithmetical "average" towards the upper 10%
 

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Sun Sep 20th, 2009 at 01:28:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
JOLTS et UK gymnasium à ET


Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Sun Sep 20th, 2009 at 10:34:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
If the goal is to have a uncreative, do-what-we-tell-you, workforce this is the way to go.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Sun Sep 20th, 2009 at 01:36:34 PM EST
BWAH!

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Sun Sep 20th, 2009 at 01:41:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
To paraphrase Terry Pratchett ...

You know how much they don't care about their employees?  They have an "Employee of the Month" program.  THAT's how much they don't care.

</cynicism>


She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Sun Sep 20th, 2009 at 02:42:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I can think of at least one company in the UK that uses those tests, is this a name and shame diary?

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Sep 20th, 2009 at 03:22:02 PM EST
This is not a "name and shame" diary. This post records, publicizes, a certain, easily verified though by blog commentators ignored HR practice. (Did you ever wonder why so few bloggers publish corporate documentation?) Let us note here, how much innerboobz opinion digests superficial "analyses" of aggregated data.

I  think your comment is an excellent prompt.

I had thought BOOTS comparable to CVS by share, value, model, other financial metrics, then decided against introducing to my readers those particular relationships to apprehension of the data. The application design is peculiar in itself. The form does not ever post/return data to the applicant (unlike, say, USAJobs) database server, "gaming" employment isn't probable.

The utility of CVS data is self-evident only to designers of the survey; the survey design may be readily comparable to competitive employers (such as Carrefours and Wal-Mart), but for purposes of evaluating firms' capital structures, of which human resources attributable to revenue maintenance the survey is only provocative. The data establishes a range of determinants of human capital requirements at one firm. Apply to BOOTs and report.

Primary research helps position innerboobz "analyses" here.



Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Sun Sep 20th, 2009 at 05:29:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think most of them do.

I hate them because I have never been asked to interview after completing one; I don't profile well.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Sep 21st, 2009 at 10:06:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Given the availability of SS# and other identifiers to scammers, it might be possible, (but not for myself), to create a series of applicants with varying responses to the questions so as to gauge their criteria by job offers.  For instance, do they screen out the most abjectly servile of respondents as probable liars?  My first real interest in psychology came when I was faced with the draft in the mid '60s.  Fortunately, my housemate was a psychology major and had access to the Minnesota Multiphase Personality Inventory, along with guidance on the internal checks used.  That information was probably helpful.

It is getting so that one must carefully construct one's presentation just so as to get a low paying job with a national retailer.  But the successful candidate may qualify their family for better health care coverage than otherwise available.  The further evolution of pretense.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Sep 20th, 2009 at 04:31:32 PM EST


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