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European Sammelsurium

by Fran Sat Jan 23rd, 2010 at 05:44:26 AM EST

Sammelsurium means hodgepodge, miscellaneous, smorgasbord, mingle-mangle or omnium-gatherum. At least these are the translations I found on the internet.

My idea is to sammeln/gather good, silly, weird and funny news, as I am currently a little tired with all the bad news all over. I know this can be considered by some, what we call in German "Vogel Strauss Politik" - meaning sticking the head in the sand, to avoid seeing unpleasantness. But in "homeopathic" doses it can have a nice and relaxing "placebo effect". :-D


So lets start with some music.

In Poland the year 2010 has been declared The Chopin Year.

Chopin Year launched in Poland with Lang Lang and 3D | Culture & Lifestyle | Deutsche Welle | 14.01.2010

Chopin's Polish identity is central to his music and Chopin himself is intrinsic to the identity of Warsaw, where he was born in 1810. The city has launched a year of celebrations, including a new museum and a 3D movie. 

Born to a Polish mother and a French father in 1810 in the village of Zelazowa Wola near Warsaw, Frederic Chopin spent his most of this youth in the Polish capital. In 1830 he left for France, where he lived till his death at the age of 40. Among Chopin's most popular works are his mazurkas, based on national Polish folklore, piano concertos, and nocturnes.

 

The Polish characteristics in Chopin's music are associated with the fact that he lived at a time when Poland did not exist as a state, explained musicologist Monika Strugala, who is also the project coordinator for the Chopin Year 2010.

 

Poland had been partitioned by neighboring Russia, Austria and Prussia in the late 18th century and culture was one way of preserving the Polish national spirit.

 

Here some of examples of his music for your enjoyment:

If you like to know more about Chopin your find more here.


=======================================


Let's stay for a moment with music, or better with dancing. Are you someone who thinks he has been born with two left feet? Well there might be hope for you - Dr. Dance has found explanations, there seems to be more to it - read Sexual Politics of Dancing: The Secrets of Looking Good on the Dance Floor - SPIEGEL ONLINE - News - International

Here the short conclusion:

So what does Dr. Dance prescribe for those who prefer to keep their booty firmly attached to the nearest bar stool, rather than shaking it? "I don't think there is anybody who can't dance," says Lovatt. "You shouldn't be afraid of your own movements, you should relax."

At the end of the day, Dr. Dance's message is simple: "Let go, your body should move!"

And to get started right away here some music to exercise you moves.


========================================


Okay, now the next topic. Looks like France is discussing to promote a law for more women in leading positions.

France aims to shatter `glass ceiling' for women executives - Times Online

France set course for a revolution in its old boys' corporate culture yesterday as parliament considered a law to force big companies to appoint women to 40 per cent of their boardroom seats.

However there is one woman who seems to have shattered the "glass ceiling" this week.

France's Le Monde Appoints First Female Leader - NYTimes.com

PARIS -- Le Monde, widely considered France's newspaper of record, appointed a woman as executive editor on Monday, a first in its 65-year history.

Sylvie Kauffmann, 55, a former deputy executive editor and most recently a Southeast Asia correspondent for the paper, replaced Alain Frachon, who was appointed in 2007. She has been with Le Monde since 1988.

"It's a very exciting job, but it's also sobering, considering the terrible difficulties of the printed press," Ms. Kauffmann said in a telephone interview.

She said called it "a huge challenge" to lead a revered newspaper struggling to sustain itself financially in the Internet age.

First female editor at Le Monde - Editors Weblog

Sylvie Kauffmann (left) made history at Le Monde, Monday, becoming the first woman to be appointed executive editor at the 65-year-old publication. She called the appointment "the final stage of an evolution" for the newspaper, underling her sex "was not the deciding factor." As executive editor she replaces Alain Frachon, who was contracted for two years from 2007.

There isn't much information available about her, yet, at least not in English, not even a wiki page.


=============================================


And last but not least, at least when weirdness is considered.

Holiday Inn location in London offers 'human bed warmer' service - a staffer to warm up your sheets

Guests who don't want to hop into a cold bed at one English hotel now have a novel way to warm up: by enlisting a staff member to do it for them.

The Holiday Inn's Kensington, London, location will offer a free five-minute "human bed warming" service throughout next week, according to Britain's Sky News.

So what does a human bed warmer do? A hotel staffer, dressed from head-to-toe in a white, fleecy getup that looks like a cross between a footed pajama set and a snowsuit, will get into your bed upon request and move around, generating some heat between those chilly sheets.

It's akin to "having a giant hot water bottle in your bed," Holiday Inn spokesperson Jane Bednall told Sky News.

Maybe it is even a nice job if you can get it - though I guess people tastes differ. :-)

Display:
Thought a change of pace might be nice. :-)
by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Jan 23rd, 2010 at 05:45:03 AM EST
Holiday Inn location in London offers 'human bed warmer' service - a staffer to warm up your sheets

This is actually the return to a common practice from the middle ages until the 19th century. I believe I first learnt about it from Das Wirtshaus im Spessart, but I don't remember whether it was the movie or the book version.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Sat Jan 23rd, 2010 at 07:20:00 AM EST
Slept 15

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Sat Jan 23rd, 2010 at 08:27:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah, I remember the Wirtshaus im Spessart, I had a book with Wilhelm Hauff stories and saw the movie. I assume you also saw this version:

Das Wirtshaus im Spessart (Film) - Wikipedia

Das Wirtshaus im Spessart ist eine deutsche Filmkomödie von Kurt Hoffmann aus dem Jahr 1958, frei nach der gleichnamigen Vorlage Das Wirtshaus im Spessart von Wilhelm Hauff aus dem Jahre 1827. Die Uraufführung erfolgte am 15. Januar 1958.

But I can not remember the 'human bed warmer'.

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Jan 23rd, 2010 at 09:27:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yep, that's the first of three films.

Mit Liselotte Pulver in der weiblichen Hauptrolle wurde der Film ein Sensationserfolg. Diesem folgten dann noch die Filme Das Spukschloss im Spessart (1960) und Herrliche Zeiten im Spessart (1967) ebenfalls mit Liselotte Pulver. Diese Filme waren nicht mehr an die Motive von Wilhelm Hauff angelehnt.

I saw all of them, but that was up to 20 years ago; the book was more than 15 years ago too, and I don't remember a single plot element. I do recall that the bed-warmer was a nice maid some guest finds in his or her room, but can't tell if (a) I read it, (b) it was an intro for the Liselotte Pulver character in the movies, (c) it was a supporting role in the movies.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Sat Jan 23rd, 2010 at 02:28:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I loved those movies, and would equally really love to see them again -  I tried but have not really found them in Britain - Will have to buy in Germany on my next visit to amazon...

Anything with Wolfgang Neuss, really.

Which one was the movie where they are very angry at the police or the courts, slam the door and then plaster falls down from underneath the eagle, revealing a swastika?  

by PeWi on Sat Jan 23rd, 2010 at 06:50:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You guys remember all those details, I think I will have to watch those movies again.

PeWi, try amazon.de you can order them there. I am not sure if the free shipping applies.

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Jan 24th, 2010 at 01:25:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I remember that scene, but I can only guess that it was the second (when the robbers return as ghosts in the present day).

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sun Jan 24th, 2010 at 03:01:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I think Roald Dahl wrote in "Boy" that, at one of the boarding schools he attended, he had to pre-warm the seat of the toilet (situated outside) for his senior students.

That already was the 20th century... And the mind wonders how many of these practices have survived today...

by Nomad on Mon Jan 25th, 2010 at 04:01:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That's hazing, not a service for paying guests.

Not unlike the difference between rape and prostitition.

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Jan 25th, 2010 at 05:18:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The person who warms beds will get paid?

Where do I apply?

by Nomad on Mon Jan 25th, 2010 at 05:28:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Umm, yeah... 'human bed warmer' [is] a staffer and I presume staff get paid.

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Jan 25th, 2010 at 06:21:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
SCB - the swedish agency in charge of statistics - recently released their yearly update so there is lots of statistics news. A positive one was that last year 30-40 people died at work. This might look like a negative one, until you check the long trends.

I do not have the paper right now, but from memory:
1950ies: 200-300/year
1960-70ies: >100/year
1990ies: 50/year
and now it is under 40.

Long term work with improving safety pays of!

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Sat Jan 23rd, 2010 at 07:52:45 AM EST
That's quite a reduction over those 60 years. So good safety rules pay off.
by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Jan 23rd, 2010 at 09:34:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Perhaps it also has to do with being able to retire before you die.  :-)

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Jan 23rd, 2010 at 12:01:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Wonderful gallery of 'homemade' pictures from an amateur astrophotographer's garden shed in Wales. Cost 20K pounds. Compare with 2.5 billion for Hubble.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Sat Jan 23rd, 2010 at 08:40:17 AM EST
Welllllll, the HST's goal wasn't to make nice pictures... even if they have a special department for that for PR.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sat Jan 23rd, 2010 at 08:43:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Except that the purpose of Hubble is not to produce pretty posters. That's a welcome side-effect.

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Jan 23rd, 2010 at 09:29:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You could deduce that from what I wrote if you wish, since, as you know, I am a perceptions freak. For Joe Public, the Hubble pictures are the only part of the project they can enjoy. Both NASA and the ESA say that Hubble is a vital research tool AND a PR boon.

My interest in the subject is the PR side (i.e. PeRceptions). Professionally I have to make many assumptions about companies I work with, because there's never time to go in depth - except when working in a multidisciplinary team. So one has to take a lot on trust - combined with 40 years of experience in developing a decent bullshit detector. And then I get to work on how to polish the communication channel they are using or suggest new channels and new solutions.

So, from an inspiration POV, i.e. how to get people interested in astronomy in general and maybe study the subject, the 20k observatory in Wales may be at least as inspiring (and more graspably achievable) as the Hubble pictures.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Sat Jan 23rd, 2010 at 10:46:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
they are stunning, sven.

better than any human special effects...

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sat Jan 23rd, 2010 at 10:58:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Then again, for the public a little versed in astronomy, those photos from the backyard observatory are recognisable as standard shots of the brightest spectacles on the Northern night sky. Some of those you can see visually with a small telescope or even the naked eye (I saw a third of them). Meanwhile, a lot of the 'Hubble art' is not reproducable with object s observable from your backyard.

However, what amazes me is the evolution of electronic astro-photo color images. Back when I studied astronomy, everyone agreed that CCDs can't beat the color images made by the big observatories from film or glass plate photographs in beauty: too coarse, too narrow field of vision, etc. (Sidenote: any astronomer will tell you that there is no such thing as a "true colour image", and real information is on the B&W frames made with different filters; so old colour astro-photos were PR, too.) But CCD technology evolves, and the pictures in your link look almost as good as those old ones.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Sat Jan 23rd, 2010 at 02:50:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And where exactly are these people 'a little versed in astronomy'?

I can present billions of people who only know the existence of the universe through photographs they have seen. Most of these people cannot connect what they have seen with their daily lives. The photographs are as important as wallpaper.  A background to the lives that are important to them.

Where I disagree with many here at ET is in how to 'sell' different ways of  thinking. Personally I don't hold a great deal of confidence in any of the explanations, but I do enjoy the holding of those positions, in a vague kind of support for intellectual biodiversity.

There is a tendency of science to become increasingly monolithic - until the appearance of the paradigm-changing theorem that sends all previous knowledge to the back of the bike sheds.

The exciting bit of science is always that transition.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Sat Jan 23rd, 2010 at 06:44:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Are you claiming that from an inspiration POV, ... the 20k observatory in Wales may be at least as inspiring ... as the Hubble pictures is a way of selling astronomy? To me it sounds like a perfect populist argument to kill the Hubble Space Telescope. The 20k observatory in Wales is not capable of contributing to the advancement of astrophysics like the HST is (which is why the HST was built - if astronomy research could be done on 20k don't you think astronomers would do it? Are professional astronomers that stupid?).

As a PR person, how would you spin this to encourage people to support the development of powerful research telescopes rather than not? Because this doesn't seem to me to be it.

Do you not care what the effect of your PR pronouncements may be on science policy? Or do you actually believe that the HST billions were mis-spent?

There is a tendency of science to become increasingly monolithic - until the appearance of the paradigm-changing theorem that sends all previous knowledge to the back of the bike sheds.

This is a myth - actually a very damaging one. The paradigm-changing result doesn't consign the previous knowledge to the scrap-heap of history.

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Jan 23rd, 2010 at 07:25:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
From an inspiration POV, I'm fairly sure that the main reason the HST had a recent refit instead of being junked was because it's been such an impressive source of pretty pictures. Some of the images have become iconic and instantly recognisable.

But ask the hypothetical average person to name one piece of astrophysics the HST has influenced, and you'll get a blank look.

The great thing about these amateur images is that they look Hubble-ish but someone took them from their back garden. It's not totally impossible that someone will see them, wonder how they were done, and start finding out about telescopes and CCDs. From there it's not a huge step to Real Science - if only because you need to know what the different colour filters actually filter so you can use them properly.

You can get good astrophotographic images for a lot less than 20k, and if you happen to grow up with a back garden telescope and are curious, it's not a trivial resource to get you started in a professional direction.

The problem with Malin's images is that they're not accessible in the same way. If you need to travel to Mauna Kea, Las Palmas or some other Giant Scope Home to take your shots, or (more likely) book time on same remotely, you've eliminated that experience of participation for most people.

What would be immensely cool - and almost certainly won't happen, because it would be too damn expensive - would be for Hubble to become a public access telescope after it's decommissioned. I'm not sure how much STSCI costs to run, but it's not completely unlikely that there are a few million amateurs worldwide who'd be willing to pay £100 a year for a chance to get some CCD time on Hubble.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Sat Jan 23rd, 2010 at 08:05:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm fairly sure that the main reason the HST had a recent refit instead of being junked was because it's been such an impressive source of pretty pictures.

I'm no NASA insider to tell the real reasons, but it had something to do with a change at NASA's helm and the fact that HST's successor (the James Webb Telescope) is still years away.

This is not to dismiss the power of the HST pretty pictures, but I don't think anyone in this debate is challenging that. (As I wrote, STScI has its own department for making the PR pretty pictures, and they did a fine job to make people forget the error made in polishing of the main mirror, and the massive cost overruns needed for corrective optics.)

The great thing about these amateur images is that they look Hubble-ish but someone took them from their back garden.

More David Malin-ish than Hubble-ish :-)

What would be immensely cool - and almost certainly won't happen, because it would be too damn expensive - would be for Hubble to become a public access telescope after it's decommissioned.

If it could go on, it wouldn't be decommissioned :-) HST servicing isn't just about the replacement of instruments with improved ones, you have to replace solar cells and positioning gyroscopes. Once NASA stops funding for servicing missions, HST is poised to be dead in a few years, and there is a lot of professional work only it can do until then. (The JWT wll come in what, 2014 at the earliest?) And it's too damn big to be allowed to fall down on its own, so there has to be a controlled crash eventually.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Sun Jan 24th, 2010 at 03:42:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
James Webb Space Telescope - Wikipedia
The observatory is due to be launched no earlier than June 2014 and is currently scheduled to be launched by an Ariane 5 from Guiana Space Centre Kourou, French Guiana, into an L2 orbit with a launch mass of approximately 6.2 tons. After a commissioning period of approximately six months, the observatory will begin the science mission, which is expected to last a minimum of five years.

(I don't know why I left "Space" out of its name twice...)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Sun Jan 24th, 2010 at 03:43:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I have a lay person's question - the wiki states:

James Webb Space Telescope - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The JWST will not be a complete successor, because it will not be sensitive to all of the light wavelengths that Hubble can see. The main scientific goal is to observe the most distant objects in the universe, those beyond the reach of either ground based instruments or the Hubble.

So, how is it possible that the JWST, which apparently is less sensitive to all light wavelengths than Hubble, should be able to observe objects that where beyond what Hubble could perceive?

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Jan 24th, 2010 at 04:02:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Good layman question!

The JWST will be less sensitive to more bluish wavelengths than the HST, however, it will be much more sensitive to reddish and infrared wavelengths. Now, the light of the most distant objects is significantly redshifted. So, while all galaxies are the brightest in or near the band of visible light, the light of the furthest-away galaxies was released so long ago and redshifted so much until it gets into our telescopes that these galaxies can be best detected in the near infrared.

As for redshift: this is usually explained for laymen in terms of the Doppler effect (e.g. the lower pitch of the noise of receding trains), but for cosmological redshift, that is less helpful. That the Universe expands should be understood as space itself expanding -- thus, a wave of light travelling across it is stretched, too. That means that the wavelength of the wave of light is increased. Red light has longer wavelength than blue light, hence it's called redshift.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Sun Jan 24th, 2010 at 06:15:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Thanks DoDo, makes sense to me. :-)
by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Jan 24th, 2010 at 11:55:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Illustrating what I said above, from Open University, here is the Sun's spectrum:

...and a typical spiral galaxy spectrum:

A redshift of z=9 (which is in the middle of where the JWST wants to look) means that wavelengths expand 10x, that is by an order of magnitude, or one tick mark to the right on the horizontal axis of the above diagram.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Sun Jan 24th, 2010 at 06:24:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
BTW, if anyone is curious what's the possible maximum in redshift: 1089, that's the redshift of the Cosmic Microwave Background, which was a yellowish light when released (the thermal radiation of non-transparent plasma turned transparent gas), but the Universe expanded 1090x since then. However, it took some time from there for the first stars to light up, so the most distant galaxies observable even in theory will have redshifts in the dozens at most.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sun Jan 24th, 2010 at 06:32:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Are you arguing that the pictures from the shed in Wales should therefore be suppressed? Of course you aren't. Neither do I believe the HST funds were misspent.

But I do believe 'scientists' need to do a better job of promoting their relevance to society. Thus I worked on a major project last year to promote investment in the new space 'education' complex planned for the Tuorla Observatory near Turku, in Finland. This will add another planetarium, an exhibition space and other visitor amenities.

The large Herschel mirror was ground at Tuorla. Tuorla Observatory is a division of the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Turku. Together with Space Research Laboratory in the Physics division it forms the Väisälä Institute for Space Physics and Astronomy (VISPA).

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Sun Jan 24th, 2010 at 06:25:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
And where exactly are these people 'a little versed in astronomy'?

Huh? All around the world... There are LOTS of amateurs and interested, some as serious as the maker of those photos, some just visiting public observatories now and then, some just buying books or reading an article or two. You may not have met such people yourself in the media world, but it is pretty widespread.

I can present billions of people

Will billions of people bother to look even at the photographs in your link? Methinks some selection works there already.

know the existence of the universe through photographs they have seen.

Photograph vs. visual is not the point. That the brightest stellar objects visible from the mid latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere are the most observed doesn't just mean that most serious amateurs are likely to have observed them, but also that photos of those objects are most likely to end up as illustration in books and articles.

Where I disagree with many here at ET is in how to 'sell' different ways of  thinking.

What new way of thinking is to be sold with these photos exactly?

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Sun Jan 24th, 2010 at 03:12:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
For Joe Public, the Hubble pictures are the only part of the project they can enjoy.

Remember the one about how trying to justify NASA's space program on the fact that non-stick frying pans came out of it is hugely unambitious.

It would have been ridiculous to sell the Hubble project to Joe Public because "in addition, you'll get pretty pictures" because you could have answered "we can get pretty pictures for $20k, why fund a multimillion dollar space telescope?". The same thing goes for an ex-post facto justification of why the Hubble was a great thing.

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Jan 23rd, 2010 at 03:58:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Precisely! You ignore these perceptions at your peril.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Sat Jan 23rd, 2010 at 06:18:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Care to use your PR-jutsu to buttress rather than undermine research spending? In this thread you have provided and advocated a perception destructive to the advancement of science. Was that intentional?

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Jan 23rd, 2010 at 07:26:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
As Migeru said, what perception management was your goal by comparing the beauty and cost of those backyard pictures and HST pretty pictures?

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sun Jan 24th, 2010 at 03:47:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Amazing pictures - just the Pleiades as an example:

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Jan 23rd, 2010 at 09:32:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Here's David Malin's take on the Pleiades:


En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Jan 23rd, 2010 at 06:01:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I would like it better if the names where not in it - they distract a little from the beauty of the universe. :-)
by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Jan 24th, 2010 at 01:29:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Follow the link to see the picture without names.

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Jan 24th, 2010 at 10:33:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You could say that Malin et al's style was the blueprint and inspiration for amateurs.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sun Jan 24th, 2010 at 03:48:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
If you want to compare with professional pictures made to look pretty, check out David Malin's work.

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Jan 23rd, 2010 at 09:57:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Bubble wrap turns 50 on Monday

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Jan 23rd, 2010 at 09:01:40 AM EST
Seems, I am not the only one who enjoys poping the bubbles. :-)
by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Jan 23rd, 2010 at 09:29:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
If only the sub-prime market had been under the control of the Vatican ;-)

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Sat Jan 23rd, 2010 at 10:47:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]

A thoughtful visitor to Chopin's grave in the Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Jan 23rd, 2010 at 10:25:11 AM EST
My favorite Chopin remains Le Ballades. I first came to know them from an Arturo Rubenstein recording in the early 60s.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Jan 23rd, 2010 at 05:36:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Your wish is my command. :-)

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Jan 24th, 2010 at 01:34:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I forgot about that one, despite having taken a picture of it too. :-(
by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Jan 24th, 2010 at 01:35:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]


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