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Friday Open Thread

by Nomad Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 09:51:25 AM EST


Source


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Nomad's at a wedding. Not his, I don't think.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 09:53:08 AM EST
He's somewhere here:



"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - AnaÔs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 10:33:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I like this one with the European stereotypes... especially for the in-jokes and the opposed stereotypes.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 12:06:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 12:09:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Large Source

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - AnaÔs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Sat Oct 16th, 2010 at 05:15:36 AM EST
[ Parent ]
PS.  i found the photo of america's hat right here on ET...



"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - AnaÔs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Sun Oct 17th, 2010 at 06:48:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I like the French version best. Awesome!

The good news ... it's only a life sentence. You eventually leave this planet of idiots.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 10:20:40 AM EST
Sanader wants parliamentary mandate reactivated - General News - Croatian Times Online News - English Newspaper

Former PM Ivo Sanader has requested the re-activation of his mandate in the Croatian Parliament, a Parliament spokesperson has confirmed.

Sanader has returned to Croatia to testify in a case concerning the privatization of national company Ina. He has spent the last month in the United States.

Some have speculated that Sanader will use his return to gather strength and attempt a political comeback after he stepped down as PM in 2009.

I speculate that he wants parliamentary immunity from prosecution.

By laying out pros and cons we risk inducing people to join the debate, and losing control of a process that only we fully understand. - Alan Greenspan
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 10:48:59 AM EST
Nacional.hr: Sanader's 13 interventions in Hypo under investigation (2009-12-22)
The fact that Sanader intervened in the bank at least 13 times was uncovered by the heads of the Hypo Alpe Adria bank in a report on the banks status they were obliged to send to the Austrian national bank. Events surrounding the bank, following many years of agony that were marred by various scandals, ignited an unbelievable drama in Austria only a few days ago. At the end of the dramatic sequence of events it was decided that the bank would returned to state ownership, and that prior to this all of its co-owners would have to deposit onto the banks account hundreds of millions of euro, but also that some of the losses would be recuperated from the Austrian taxpayer through the state budget.

That was the primary reason for establishing the Soko Hypo special investigation unit, which will be comprised of ten financial and business experts. The unit could finally shed some light on the numerous suspicious business transactions of the Hypo Alpe Adria bank, in which, at various levels, a number of influential Croatians, led by former Prime Minister Ivo Sanader, Ivic Pasalic and Vladimir Zagorec, were involved. When reporting on the issue, the Austrian media have begun using the opportune acronym K.u.K. - Kroatien und Korruption (Croatia and corruption). In Austria the dramatic outcome of the Hypo Alpe Adria bank crisis, created an altogether new situation, which could assist Croatian authorities in the search for money stolen from funds intended for Croatia's defence. Because of the bank's large losses in Austria, previous investigations had already been initiated, but the circumstances were somewhat different. Informed financial circles in Austria confirmed for Nacional that during those investigations there may have been some calculating, so as to not directly harm Austrian interests, and the Hypo Alpe Adria bank's business in Austria, as well as in Croatia. An Austrian political source confirmed for Nacional that these circumstances are different this time around. It is predicted that the special investigation unit will, this time around, not calculate at all in its investigation of illegalities, specifically with regards to those connected to the bank's business dealings in Croatia.

Nacional learned from informed legal sources that last week the competent Austrian institutions once again contacted the Croatia State Attorney's Office, in an effort to intensify cooperation that is ongoing since the extradition of Vladimir Zagorec as a result of the gem scandal. A date has not yet been set as to when Soko Hypo representatives will meet with representatives from the Croatian State Attorney's Office, but it will happen very quickly. "We agreed to intensify our already good cooperation and concluded that the issue in question is very serious, in which we must reciprocally assist one another, because that is the only way to bring things to a conclusion. Our Austrian colleagues told us that they too could not complete their investigations without Croatian assistance, and we informed them that we could not resolve some of our open issues without Austrian help. We cannot do this individually, both sides are aware of this, and now we can begin to talk of the launch of a new phase of cooperation, which will certainly lead to good results," an informed legal source in Croatia told Nacional.

That was in December. Sanader appeared before a parliamentary committe of inquiry of some sort in Zagreb this past week, but apparently he had refused an earlier invitation to clarify these things before the parliament.

By laying out pros and cons we risk inducing people to join the debate, and losing control of a process that only we fully understand. - Alan Greenspan
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 10:53:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Right, we've had the whole foreclosure scandal laid out. So we know where we are and, right now, it appears that the financial system can only survive unscathed for conditions that satisfy 2 + 2 = 493.

But that's right now. Question is : What happens next ?

Can the US govt successfully smuggle through the conceit that the foreclosures must continue because the little people defaulted on their loans and, irrespective of all the bothersome regulations that they don't like anyway, so they gotta lose their homes and we'll sort out the real ownership later ?

Or will the legal tangle about the primacy of title and ownership actually sink the ship ?

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 11:56:05 AM EST
There's no legal tangle.  Foreclosures are a matter of state law, not federal.  Uncle Sam can't wave the magic wand and unshit the bed.

And that isn't even the real issue.  The real issue is that, as I understand it, if you can't produce the note, then the MBSes don't legally exist.

So the assets don't exist.  So the creditworthiness isn't there anymore.  And presumably there's leveraging involved here.  And credit moves trigger options in other deals.

And those are just the cases where they thought they were putting out legitimate MBSes.  Which it now seems they were not (seriously, read that).

So, yeah, I'm thinking this is pretty much Armageddon.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 12:50:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
So can the banks then go to each state and say "Look, you sort this out in the way we want or no loans for anyone inside your state boundaries. everyone else will be getting them and you'll go down as the guy who turned the local state into a third world  country". Ok there will be a lot more palms to grease and a lot bigger chance of somebody somewhere blowing the whistle on the whole sordid deal but will states be easier to strong arm than the federal government?

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 01:27:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
One problem with that scenario is that, just now, no one particularly wants any new loans, except for homeowners who are financed at >6% and would like to re-finance at <4%, which seems like burning good money to the banks that hold the existing mortgages. And Wall Street is seriously lacking in local constituencies in the 49 states other than New York.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 02:20:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
All 50 attorneys general opened investigations together this week.  So there's no gain there.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sat Oct 16th, 2010 at 08:13:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
a lot of that promise/threat of armageddon is predicated on the primacy of the rule of law and the legal processing of title.

But I can't help thinking that the pols are just as aware of the abyss yawning below and are gonna force a fix through that will save the system, however much they tear a hole in the Constitution or the very concept of the rule of law. I can just imagine the form of the justifications;-

it's the American way that if you fall behind in your payments you lose your home,

never mind you were sold a pup by fraudsters who couldn't even be bothered to do the paperwork to prove you owe them a brass farthing, it's buyer beware.

you're poor, you're weak and America is only for the strong. Survival of the fittest is what makes America great and the weak fall by the wayside.

I can go only like that for ages. the system has been rigged for years, it's time for it to come out of the shadows

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 02:06:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Now that the state AGs are involved, I think at least a handful of them will create a political crisis when they resist the legislation to kill property rights for the masses that is inevitably coming at the federal level.

Sure, 25% of the populate is still pissed we have a black president and they're the same people who believe in America as a land of survival of the fittest. The other 75% want the banks to burn in hell.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 02:14:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"The other 75% want the banks to burn in hell." -- And may their wish be granted! And let the debt they fraudulently created be burned with them. Then all of the countries whose banks and citizens bought the bogus RMBSs and the CDOs written around them will have to figure out how to deal with the fact that their security just evaporated. It is much more plausible that other banks "should have known" than that individual borrowers "should have known". It will be hard to spin it otherwise, at least to the borrowers.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 02:26:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The other 75% want the banks to burn in hell.

and they're mad as hell and will vote Tea Party ... ah well, never mind

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 02:45:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Now that the state AGs are involved, I think at least a handful of them will create a political crisis when they resist the legislation to kill property rights for the masses that is inevitably coming at the federal level.

So the SUpreme Court will get involved...

By laying out pros and cons we risk inducing people to join the debate, and losing control of a process that only we fully understand. - Alan Greenspan

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 03:02:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
which given the current disposition of the USSC will only lead to a solution entirely in the banks favour.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 03:24:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Refusing to accept the supreme court's decision is one possible form of the political crisis I'm referring to.

The closer the politicians get to the local level the more the the more the public holds them accountable, IMO, and the banks don't own the state houses the way they own Washington.

Of all the passivity in the face of erosion of freedom during the Bush years - those losses were entirely abstract for the majority of the population. Americans have never lived under Franco or Pinochet. This is different - losing your home because the bank feels like taking it is 100% real and drops a nuclear bomb on the social contract.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 03:29:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah, now that I understand

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 03:34:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Exactly.  This is what many have been hammering on: This isn't just an issue of technical fuck-ups.  This is a complete breakdown in the mechanism that protects people's property rights.

It's not possible for two banks to foreclose on the same house without fraud.  It's not possible to foreclose on someone who didn't have a mortgage without fraud.

Even in the cases where we actually are talking about merely flawed paperwork (and those are by no stretch all the cases, I'll bet), you can't have these technical problems without systemic fraud.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sat Oct 16th, 2010 at 08:20:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It's not fraud if you win and you don't do jail time.

This is like enclosure, the clearings or any other historical land grab.

Wikipedia:

The process of enclosure has sometimes been accompanied by force, resistance, and bloodshed, and remains among the most controversial areas of agricultural and economic history in England. Marxist and neo-Marxist historians argue that rich landowners used their control of state processes to appropriate public land for their private benefit. This created a landless working class that provided the labour required in the new industries developing in the north of England. For example: "In agriculture the years between 1760 and 1820 are the years of wholesale enclosure in which, in village after village, common rights are lost".[1] "Enclosure (when all the sophistications are allowed for) was a plain enough case of class robbery"

The difference this time is that the left-overs will become vagrant and useless. There's nothing for them to do, except steal and deal.

And given that politically the choice is between Obama, whose take-down of the bankers lacks a certain enthusiasm, and some right-wing wacko with mental health issues - pick any one from the badgers-with-rabies bag of bonkers candidates - a new vagrant class dying in ditches is the most likely outcome.

State AGs can only push it up to the Supremes. And we know whose side they're on.

Unfortunately for the bankers, what's more likely to happen is that they'll start suing each other at some point. That's when it's going to get interesting.

But I don't have much optimism in bottom-up legal challenges, because that whole due process thing has been a joke in the US since Gitmo, at least. This development is just the director's cut for domestic release.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Sat Oct 16th, 2010 at 09:12:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
State AGs can only push it up to the Supremes. And we know whose side they're on.

Theoretically they could push it to the Supreme Court, but even if the winger justices wanted to do a land grab (Tenth Amendment be damned), I don't think they have the votes.  There isn't any law to work off for the feds as far as the foreclosures go.

The MBSs, perhaps.

Most likely, I think, is SCOTUS will want no part of this.  As you know, SCOTUS's first reaction on an issue the public is well aware of is to run away as quickly as it can.  You'll get them to finally make an opinion known on same-sex marriage before this.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sat Oct 16th, 2010 at 09:28:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Truthout: Foreclosuregate and Obama's "Pocket Veto" (07 October 2010)
Amid a snowballing foreclosure fraud crisis, President Obama today blocked legislation that critics say could have made it more difficult for homeowners to challenge foreclosure proceedings against them.

The bill passed the Senate with unanimous consent and with no scrutiny by the DC media. In a maneuver known as a "pocket veto," President Obama indirectly vetoed the legislation by declining to sign the bill passed by Congress while legislators are on recess.

...

The swift passage and the president's subsequent veto of this bill come on the heels of an announcement that Wall Street banks are voluntarily suspending foreclosure proceedings in 23 states.

MERS is a system that allows banks to bypass the legal obligation to hold the physical note in order to foreclose. Note how this bill passed the senate unanimously...

By laying out pros and cons we risk inducing people to join the debate, and losing control of a process that only we fully understand. - Alan Greenspan
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Oct 16th, 2010 at 11:58:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Without a record of who was present, in either the Senate or the House.
by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Sat Oct 16th, 2010 at 02:57:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yeah, because "passing by unanimous consent" means (if I remember Roberts's Rules of Order properly) that the speaker asks "is there any objection to unanimous consent?" and, if there isn't, the motion is not put to a vote.

But you would expect there to have been a quorum and the minutes of the session to record who was present, wouldn't you?

By laying out pros and cons we risk inducing people to join the debate, and losing control of a process that only we fully understand. - Alan Greenspan

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Oct 16th, 2010 at 04:44:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There has to be a quorum in the chamber for the Senate to be in session.  I don't think there has to be a quorum in the chamber to pass legislation.  I know a Quorum Call is a standard tactic when someone wants to be a PITA, for some reason, and drag everybody from whatever it was they were doing into the chamber to prove there is a quorum "present."  

So, I'd say as long as nobody questioned it and under Unanimous Consent it was passed under the Rules of the Senate.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Sat Oct 16th, 2010 at 05:06:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You would think in the current climate it would be impossible for anything to pass by unanimous consent. However, you would be wrong. It is very revealing that it's something such as this that can pass by unanimous consent.

It is also revealing of the skin-deep support for this measure that Obama vetoed this and the Senate didn't pass it again.

So, what happened, was the motion snuck in by some bank hack, and approved by "yeah, whatever", until someone at the White House actually read it and figured it might not be such a good idea?

Also, this veto adds some nuance to Krugman's

True to form, the Obama administration's response has been to oppose any action that might upset the banks, like a temporary moratorium on foreclosures while some of the issues are resolved. Instead, it is asking the banks, very nicely, to behave better and clean up their act. I mean, that's worked so well in the past, right?


By laying out pros and cons we risk inducing people to join the debate, and losing control of a process that only we fully understand. - Alan Greenspan
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Oct 16th, 2010 at 06:09:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Has this ever happened before? Vetoing legislation that passed unanimously?
by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Sun Oct 17th, 2010 at 01:59:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
This is just weird.

The legislation passes unanimously, but without an actual vote (just by "no objection to unanimous consent").

In parliamentary procedure, unanimous consent, also known as general consent, or in the case of the parliaments under the Westminster system, leave of the house, is a situation in which no one present objects to a proposal. The chair may state, for instance: "If there is no objection, the motion will be adopted. [pause] Since there is no objection, the motion is adopted" or in Westminster parliaments, "There being no objection, leave is granted." On the most routine matters, such as inserting an article into the Congressional Record, the chair may shorten this statement to four words: "Without objection, so ordered" or even to two words: "Without objection." If no member objects the motion is adopted, but if any member does declare his opposition the motion is not adopted and cannot be agreed to without a vote.
Then it gets an underhanded veto ("pocket veto")
A pocket veto is a legislative maneuver in United States federal lawmaking that allows the President to indirectly veto a bill. The U.S. Constitution requires the President to sign or veto any legislation placed on his desk within ten days (not including Sundays) while the United States Congress is in session. From the U.S. Constitution Article 1, Section 7 states:
If any Bill shall not be returned by the President within ten days (Sundays excepted) after it shall have been presented to him, the same shall be a Law, in like manner as if he had signed it, unless the Congress by their Adjournment prevent its return, in which case it shall not be a Law.
If the President does not sign the bill within the required time period, the bill becomes law by default. However, the exception to this rule is if Congress adjourns before the ten days have passed and the President has not yet signed the bill. In such a case, the bill does not become law; it is effectively, if not actually, vetoed.
This is the equivalent of passive-aggressive behaviour on the part of the legislative and executive branches, presumably in response to very strong pressure from the financial sector and in strong fear of a very polarised public opinion (whatever you do you will be denounced by either the left or the right in the strongest terms, so you just do nothing).

In other words, both the Congress and the White House are scared out of their wits and doing stupid shit they are not convinced about.

By laying out pros and cons we risk inducing people to join the debate, and losing control of a process that only we fully understand. - Alan Greenspan

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Oct 17th, 2010 at 03:58:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
...adding: And it isn't that they don't own state houses.  They just don't own the right state houses, because of the magic of regionalized industry.  I'm sure they have huge influence in New York and North Carolina, but that and a dollar will get you a cup of coffee in Arizona.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sat Oct 16th, 2010 at 09:31:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
...adding: Atrios really did nail the naming of this whole thing.  "Big Shitpile."

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 12:56:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I thought Mig held the copyright on "Big Shitpile".

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 02:27:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Nope...

By laying out pros and cons we risk inducing people to join the debate, and losing control of a process that only we fully understand. - Alan Greenspan
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 02:57:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
One thing's for sure, we knew there was a pile of shit hidden under the Big Shitpile™, and that nothing had been done to shovel it out. Now it's coming into glorious smelly sight.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 04:27:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I was all prepared with an essay about the Constitutional fight between the agrarian (and slave owner) Jefferson and the from the slums bank founding (and early anti-slave advocate) Hamilton to answer your question.

In the end, we are probably thinking of this as a problem for the monied classes, when it is probably just another chess move in the game of squeezing all the assets out of the middle class. They probably don't see any of these marbles dropping on the floor as a problem at all.

Thus, the answer is, "Which ship?" Certainly not the one that they are on.

U.S. Constitution: Article I
  Clause 18. Necessary and Proper Clause
The Congress shall have Power To lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts and Excises, to pay the Debts and provide for the common Defence and general Welfare of the United States; but all Duties, Imposts and Excises shall be uniform throughout the United States;

bla bla bla

To make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into Execution the foregoing Powers, and all other Powers vested by this Constitution in the Government of the United States, or in any Department or Officer thereof.

Article 2
  Clause 2
Bla bla...but the Congress may by Law vest the Appointment of such inferior Officers, as they think proper, in the President alone, in the Courts of Law, or in the Heads of Departments.

And thus is the basis for the whateverthefucktheywanttodotoprotecttheirdonorsClause

Never underestimate their intelligence, always underestimate their knowledge.

Frank Delaney ~ Ireland

by siegestate (siegestate or beyondwarispeace.com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 12:59:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
But that's right now. Question is : What happens next ?

Another market crash led by a slaughter of the financials, that's what's next.

Unless Obama pulls a TARP within days.

By laying out pros and cons we risk inducing people to join the debate, and losing control of a process that only we fully understand. - Alan Greenspan

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 03:53:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I am equipped with popcorn and market shorts (not joking on either count).

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 05:01:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
We know 493 isn't a prime number since it is evenly divided by 17 and 29.

So we have a step forward in analyzing your equation.

;-)


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 07:44:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Please pity me folks - I suffer from "oppositional defiant disorder" and I'm SICK !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Is nonconformity and freethinking a mental illness? According to the
newest addition of the DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of
Mental Disorders), it certainly is. The manual identifies a new
mental illness called "oppositional defiant disorder" or ODD. Defined
as an "ongoing pattern of disobedient, hostile and defiant behavior,"
symptoms include questioning authority, negativity, defiance,
argumentativeness, and being easily annoyed.

The DSM-IV is the manual used by psychiatrists to diagnose mental
illnesses and, with each new edition, there are scores of new mental
illnesses. Are we becoming sicker? Is it getting harder to be
mentally healthy? Authors of the DSM-IV say that it's because they're
better able to identify these illnesses today. Critics charge that
it's because they have too much time on their hands.

New mental illnesses identified by the DSM-IV include arrogance,
narcissism, above-average creativity, cynicism, and antisocial behavior.

(my bold)

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 12:49:14 PM EST
I believe that people have been thrown into gulags by the soviets for decades over this.Seems the commies were way ahead.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 01:50:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
ODD is new. The rest aren't on the list either in DSM-IV or the proposed DSM-5.

Although the creator of DSM-III had this to say about the secrecy with which DSM-5 is being drafted:

Robert Spitzer, the head of the DSM-III task force, has publicly criticized the APA for mandating that DSM-5 task force members sign a nondisclosure agreement, effectively conducting the whole process in secret: "When I first heard about this agreement, I just went bonkers."
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 02:07:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
(Correction - narcissism is on the list, but it's been there for a while.)
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 02:08:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
ceebs:
above-average creativity

that is absolutely the most terrifying disease, one we should all fear and medicate into oblivion!

how can we hope for the triumph of the banal and victory of the mediocre unless we scythe these 'tall poppies' down to the level of the honest weeds that thrive around our ankles?

get treatment early and often, until your creativity comes down to a readout tolerably close to zero. only then you too can raise the proud banner of sanity and feel normal.

a rapid jump from vonnegut straight into huxley world...

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 02:33:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
As usual, the onion delivers reality a decade ahead of time.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 03:03:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I thought that was a hoax...

By laying out pros and cons we risk inducing people to join the debate, and losing control of a process that only we fully understand. - Alan Greenspan
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 02:58:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 04:31:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]

A little snow fell last night in Borgå - gone by 09.30.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 01:49:17 PM EST
time to roll the duvet over your head and hibernate methinks.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 01:52:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I stocked up on food today with that very thought in mind.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 02:01:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
We had a bit of snow falling today. Melted as soon as it touched the ground, but still.

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!
by A swedish kind of death on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 03:08:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Indeed. Today's maxima temperature was below 30°C for the first time in months, here.

Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misŤres
by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 07:22:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
no comment

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - AnaÔs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 07:28:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Amazing the snow knew how to fall in such a manner so as to only outline the bricks.  Everything in Finland is highly trained, I suppose.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 07:40:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There are no bricks - this is a continuous plate of granite. What the snow pattern reveals is the lattice structure of radon radiation acting upon water crystals. Any fool knows this....

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Sat Oct 16th, 2010 at 04:50:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Purported list of Anglo Irish Bank bond holders on Guido Fawkes, as advertised by Declan Ganley - right wing shill alert applies: http://bit.ly/97kIWw
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 03:11:01 PM EST

...which turned up on my youngest's facebook status.

There's hope for him yet.

Brilliant quality recording.

"The future is already here -- it's just not very evenly distributed" William Gibson

by ChrisCook (cojockathotmaildotcom) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 03:30:49 PM EST
Photobucket

My phone camera obviously has a faster refresh rate than my eye, but it also doesn't to a continuous exposure like film would...

By laying out pros and cons we risk inducing people to join the debate, and losing control of a process that only we fully understand. - Alan Greenspan

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 03:50:45 PM EST
As you're posting here, i'll take it as a given that you made it home as the turbo-prop began shedding rotor blades.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - AnaÔs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 04:09:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
NY Times: 3 Harvard Researchers Retract a Claim on the Aging of Stem Cells
The retraction was published in Thursday's issue of Nature and is signed by the senior author, Amy J. Wagers, and two others. They say that serious concerns, which they did not specify, have undermined their confidence in the original report.

...

Dr. Wagers issued a statement saying that she had immediately brought the disturbing information to the attention of Nature and the Harvard Medical School, and that she was working to repeat the experiments. She said by e-mail that the information came to light in the course of studies in her laboratory, prompting her to re-examine the reported data.

...

Dr. Wagers has expressed her doubts about a second paper co-authored with Dr. Mayack and published in the journal Blood in August 2008. In a statement issued today, the journal said it was posting a "Notice of Concern" about the paper pending further review.



By laying out pros and cons we risk inducing people to join the debate, and losing control of a process that only we fully understand. - Alan Greenspan
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 04:17:24 PM EST
Exactly how it is supposed to work.

Kudos to Dr. Wagers and the other authors for their intellectual honesty.  

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 07:39:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
His co-author, Ivan Oransky, said many of the retractions involved post-doctoral students who produced unreliable data. It is not clear whether the competitive nature of science puts pressure on the students to cut corners, or whether the laboratory chief creates an atmosphere that induces cheating, Dr. Oransky said.


By laying out pros and cons we risk inducing people to join the debate, and losing control of a process that only we fully understand. - Alan Greenspan
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 15th, 2010 at 09:14:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Don't know if this has been posted.  Worth a listen:

TED | Steven Johnson:  Where Good Ideas Come

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Sat Oct 16th, 2010 at 12:47:55 AM EST
Chain text message going around France today:

"Mets vite la tele sur TF1; des ravisseurs viennent d'enlever sarkozy et demande une tres forte somme d'argent en echange! Si on ne paye pas il menace de le bruler avec de l'essence! On organise donc une quette nationale. Tu donne combien? 10 ou 20 litres d'essence?"

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!

by LEP on Sat Oct 16th, 2010 at 03:07:24 AM EST
Quickly put the TV on TF1, the kidnappers came and asked Sarkozy to remove a very large sum of money in exchange! If you do not pay it threatens to burn it with gasoline! We therefore organized a national quest. You give what? 10 or 20 liters of gasoline?

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - AnaÔs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Sat Oct 16th, 2010 at 04:20:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]


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