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Get on the bus

by In Wales Mon Oct 25th, 2010 at 11:48:01 AM EST

Every time I come across Iain Duncan Smith, he gives me another reason to dislike him.  In my whole life, I have been in the House of Commons twice and both times IDS has pushed me out of his way.  Not a teeny nudge in a crowded area, trying to squeeze through.  An almighty proper 'don't you know who I am' shove when I wasn't even in his way.

So, Reasons Why I Don't Like Iain Duncan Smith:

1 - He is rude
2 - He is a Tory
3 - He's telling the people of Merthyr to 'get on a bus' and go and find a job in Cardiff.


BBC News - Union anger over Duncan Smith 'get on bus' comment

Work and Pensions Secretary Iain Duncan Smith has come under fire from the unions after saying the unemployed should "get on a bus" to look for jobs.

Union leaders said the comment was similar to Lord Tebbit's 1981 suggestion that workless should "get on their bikes".

For information, Merthyr is a valleys town in South Wales that was built on the coal mining industry.  The coal is no longer there, unemployment is high, deprivation is high and if there were a quick fix solution to this we'd have found it by now.

BBC News - Union anger over Duncan Smith 'get on bus' comment

"Iain Duncan Smith offers us a 19th-century vision of sturdy beggars and the undeserving poor, while the bankers and their chums continue to rake in millions and dodge taxes. The only polite reaction to all this is to say: shame on you."

The Public and Commercial Services union, the biggest civil service union, also suggested that Mr Duncan Smith, who has earned cross-party praise for his work on social exclusion and is the architect of ambitious reforms to the welfare system, had revealed his true colours with the remark.

The Public and Commercial Services Union have come back with their analysis showing that the jobs aren't there in Merthyr, but nor would the jobs be there if all the unemployed of the valleys popped down the road to Cardiff. And even if they did, vacancies are for low paid, shitty hours jobs.  Get the bus to work by all means, but you'll get a bus back after your shift when hell freezes over.

Nine jobseekers for every job in Duncan Smith's Cardiff - News centre - PCS

On Friday 22 October there were 1,670 unemployed people in Merthyr, south Wales, and 39 job vacancies, all temporary and part-time. The number of people out of work in Merthyr and Blaenau Gwent combined was more than the total number of job vacancies for the whole of Wales.

Of the Cardiff vacancies, the vast majority were temporary and part-time. Of the temporary jobs, most were unskilled labouring for just one or three weeks' duration.

The most popular vacancy on the day the union carried out its research was a Christmas job in a well known store working four-hour shifts on Saturdays and Sundays for the national minimum wage.

Among the permanent jobs was work in a casino or bars. Neither offered help with journeys home afterwards and the last bus out of Cardiff leaves at 11.06pm. Workers from outside the city might be able to get the bus to work, but they would not be able to get home.

So once more, the Tories are picking on people who are trapped in situations that they do not have the power to get themselves out of.  Criteria for Jobseekers allowance now say that people should be willing to travel for up to 1.5 hours to find work and anything less than an hour does not get reimbursed, adding to the expense of seeking work.

BBC News - Union anger over Duncan Smith 'get on bus' comment

"The Conservatives are cutting jobs, cutting help for childcare, cutting working tax credit that makes work pay and even cutting support for buses."

Just what are people expected to do?

Display:
And thats If bus routes are even there in the future after the announced cuts to the Bus service Operators grant

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Oct 25th, 2010 at 02:15:59 PM EST
ea, count me amongst those who hoped that IDS might have got a clue. But tories are practically characterised by their refusal to adapt their ideology in the face of inconvenient facts.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Oct 25th, 2010 at 02:46:42 PM EST
I should think a tent on a patch of waste ground would do the trick. It all depends how much you really want to work.

What's that? You are A. Tory and you have a title deed to that ground and the rent is a fiver a square foot per night?

Well, there's always the corner of a shop doorway somewhere. It all depends how much you really...

Oh, while we're about it:

Replace Maggie features with Duncan Smith features.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Oct 25th, 2010 at 03:03:55 PM EST
Steve had more savagery in those days. He's more subtle these days but sometimes a cartoonist needs to leave a corpse on a blood soaked floor.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Oct 25th, 2010 at 03:41:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I suppose I should give IDS some points for knowing that Wales exists.

Jeremy Hunt's geographical knowledge has got him into a spot of trouble following a comment made in todays's culture, media and sport questions. After Labour MP Ian Lucas asked why Wales had been excluded from the government's high-speed broadband pilots Mr Hunt claimed Wales "had not been excluded" as a pilot was occuring in Herefordshire, a county in the West Midlands.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Mon Oct 25th, 2010 at 03:51:32 PM EST
and if any Welshman tries to nick some of Hereford's broadband, it's heartening to know that it's still legal to shoot him with a longbow.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Oct 25th, 2010 at 04:06:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
wow he's obviously got the job of Welsh secretary in his future, judging from some of the past tory office holders.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Oct 25th, 2010 at 04:08:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Mon Oct 25th, 2010 at 04:53:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
European Tribune - Get on the bus
Just what are people expected to do?
Be born rich.

Of all the ways of organizing banking, the worst is the one we have today — Mervyn King, 25 October 2010
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 06:28:01 AM EST
by Nomad on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 06:44:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That's not rich, as we've discussed in the past.

Of all the ways of organizing banking, the worst is the one we have today — Mervyn King, 25 October 2010
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 06:50:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Jerome a Paris:
How rich is filthy rich?

Millionaires: think you're rich? Think again. According to multi-millionaire entrepreneur Felix Dennis, a total net worth of £1m (€1.1m) to £2m means you are merely comfortably poor.

Net worth Definition

£1m - £2m The comfortable poor

£3m - £4m The comfortably off

£5m - £15m The comfortably wealthy

£16m - £39m The lesser rich

£40m - £74m The comfortably rich

£75m - £99m The rich

£100m - £199m The seriously rich

£200m - £399m The truly rich

£400m - £999m The filthy rich

Over £1bn The super rich



Of all the ways of organizing banking, the worst is the one we have today — Mervyn King, 25 October 2010
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 06:55:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
He can afford a car though, and childcare.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 10:23:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That is true.

The irony in all this is that they're really getting out of their way to ensure that people can't live on benefits and have to take jobs that leave them worse off than if they had no job and no benefits.

Of all the ways of organizing banking, the worst is the one we have today — Mervyn King, 25 October 2010

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 10:29:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Just what are people expected to do?

Die quietly. Starve to death. Die of exposure. Just stop being a nuisance. You're no longer needed ... used coffee grounds in a filter seeking a garbage can. Accept your fate. Only those rude French ... and God knows what the colonists will do ... ever think of resisting. It's not British. You worship the wealthy. Now die for them, your new ... or is it old ... gods.

The good news ... it's only a life sentence. You eventually leave this planet of idiots.

by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 10:56:43 AM EST
I keep telling people that I watch US politics cos the policies and attitudes are coming here within 5 years. I wish the British could get a clue, but while the Sun and the Mail rule our national sensibilities we're turkeys already stuffed for christmas

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 12:35:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The UK has become steadily Americanised since WWII, and it's an ongoing process.

The Brits have their own brand of class viciousness, though.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Oct 27th, 2010 at 05:19:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
What the spending review welfare cuts mean for social care - 10/26/2010 - Community Care
Welfare reform has really hit the headlines in the last few weeks, but the debate has been dominated by one or two `big' issues - the taxing of child benefit for higher-earners being the biggest, which of course in no way reflects on the income of the journalists and broadcasters covering the story. But it was also simple - there were no subtle nuances or consequences other than a direct loss of income for one sector of society. That has now changed with the comprehensive spending review.

Employment and support allowance is to be withdrawn after a year from those who get it because they've paid national insurance contributions in the past, unless they are in the most disabled `support' group. Affected claimants will need to claim ESA via a means-test instead. ESA already involves a very stringent `health' test - this introduces a further `wealth' test, which will take those with savings or, more crucially, a working partner, out of entitlement, losing them £91.40 a week.

There are other changes however, which take even more understanding and unravelling - and many of those changes impact directly on social care clients. The implications may not be obvious at first glance, if the reform is noted at all, but the consequences could be felt on social care and children's services over the next few years.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 12:50:20 PM EST
Am I reading that right ? After you've been on benefits for a year you're dumped and get nothing ?

It's just I can foresee a few problems with that one. Irrespective of the fact that I've only got 5 months to go myself and may have to hone my burglary skills.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 01:21:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No if you're on sickness benefits, after a year you get transferred onto jobseekers, where no matter your sickness (Unless you're classified as absolutely unable to work) you are put onto jobseekers allowance and lose all supplementary pay to help with your disability and have to prove you're trying hard enough to look for work.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 01:28:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yeh, but. No, but. Yeh, but, no, but... yeh,  It's all about fairness.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 03:48:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I suppose the unemployed could support their own interests and vote Labour...oops, no, that wouldn't work either...

I have this image stuck in my head of a punk with hugely spiked hair working at a car factory in Britain in the late 1970s.

by asdf on Fri Oct 29th, 2010 at 10:32:46 PM EST


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