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The Magical iPad

by ThatBritGuy Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 08:02:34 AM EST

Does the world need another iPad mini-review? Probably not. But because I'm waiting for something to download before I can do any real work, here are some quick thoughts anyway - without further anthropological speculations about the nature of magical thinking in marketing, which will be back in a separate diary. (Probably.)


Where are we now?

It's not a bigger iPod touch. There are three potential killer app angles:

  1. A portable games console. It's like a portable PSP3 or Nintendo or whatever, with a better interface. The games market has a narrow demographic, but it has obvious appeal as a games platform. Developers can see the benefits right away. Expect an explosion of games, and it wouldn't be completely surprising to see the iPad find a niche as a leeeeet games machine.

  2. The bookshelf/media box. This is more problematic, because it assumes that the iBook project is going to be as successful as iTunes has been.

Problem - publishing is a completely different market, with a completely different audience profile. It's much smaller - people are more likely to buy music than books. It's not as developed - eBooks still make up less than 10% of a typical title's sales. And it has an exotic veneer of middle class pretension that's entirely absent from music, and which limits the appeal. There's a lot of passion in publishing, but it's a passionate interest among a relatively small number of potential purchasers.

I'd give this a 50:50 chance of succeeding. The technology isn't bad, and the marketing model may work. But so far eBooks have been strongest for trivial content for undemanding readers. Erotic fiction is particularly popular. And it's mostly created by amateur and semi-pro writers.

The new-publishing vs old-publishing theme needs a separate diary, but I don't - so far - see evidence that Apple understands that books are not just units, like mp3 tracks are. They're not a casual purchase, especially not at $9.99 and above, they're politically and culturally sensitive, so you can't censor them without attracting very bad PR. So I don't think many people are going to buy an iPad exclusively as a book machine.

The smart move would be to deal directly with authors, and let anyone sell their own titles, with minimal editorial oversight. Apple could then do the bulk thing, take a profitable cut from every sale. Authors would think there was a market. A few authors would be featured in Wired, explaining how they got very rich, while most would make nothing.

And so on. Unfortunately it's more likely that Apple will still deal with publishers as aggregators, which is going to limit what's possible.

There are also practical issues - what happens if I want to look at three or four reference books at the same time? - which apply to all eReaders.

Summary - an interesting idea, but iffy in practice.

The one exception is magazine publishing. Most magazines are a waste of paper - they get thrown out after a month - and it's easy to imagine the iPad becoming a very upmarket reader for the glossies, because it eliminates or significantly reduces the physical print budget overnight.

It doesn't look as if Apple has considered this yet. But it might if Conde Nast have a quiet word.

3. The Computer For Everyone Else

This is the perhaps the most interesting but also the most nebulous part of the proposal. iPhone OS is currently brain damaged - no multitasking makes messaging and other essentials difficult to impossible. This may change in a future update, but because of the underlying programming model, it may not be true, full, open multitasking.

The idea that you can browse and send email - netbook stylee - without all the cruft and crap accumulated by a 'proper' OS is an interesting one. Up to a point. So - grandma can get online. That's good, right?

Not if you're a developer. The iPhone has an interesting business model. It takes two to three months for most people to master the development environment from a cold start. Once you've done that, it's relatively easy to keep knocking out toy apps.

iPhone apps are simple - they usually do one thing only - with well defined edges. Many of them are slightly grown up desktop/dashboard widgets. The interface is assembled from predefined blocks that can't be customised, but which leave space for a bit of basic animation or graphic design. This simplifies development and enforces a standard look and feel.

So almost anyone who can do basic C can bolt something together quickly, get it into the store, and have a reasonable chance of selling at least a few copies. (This won't make them any money - Apple doesn't pay out less than $150 per territory - but they won't find that out until later.)

The iPhone's limitations make it a simple platform to write for. It's classic volume marketing. There are tens of millions of possible customers, so the aim is to write something simple quickly with mass appeal, and sell in volume at low cost, as an impulse purchase.

That's no longer true for the iPad. Although the technology is similar, the business model is completely different and much more traditional. Firstly, it's going to sell in much smaller numbers, so that limits the possible market. Secondly, the demographic is split into very distinct interest groups - older/non-expert, student, fanboi/geek, book reader, musician, and so on. The possible market for a non-trivial app that targets a niche is relatively tiny.

And finally, because the iPad offers more customisation, a more complex interface, and more screen space, a non-trivial app is going to take three or four times longer to develop - from six months upwards. This puts it more into the OS X app market, which is also Not Big.

This isn't to say that decent apps are impossible. But it changes the economics of development, and makes payback almost inversely proportional to originality and effort. And because apps will still be expected to sell for small change - maybe $40 at the outside - there's not a lot of room for income overhead.

I'd guess we'll see a lot of mass-interest educational/lifestyle apps - recipe books, cocktail lists, tarot card games, and such - plus a few early-bird shiny and clever apps.

But the shiny and clever apps won't sell particularly well, and developers may well find themselves making a loss on their time, which will depress the market after the first year or so. It also means non-trivial apps will have to be more expensive, which will limit the market further, without the iPhone's 'yeah, I'll pay $1 for that' mindset.

The future

Some predictions:

Third-party hardware will become more of a market than it is for the iPhone. Aside from plastic cases - buyers will need one - I think it's a certainty that someone somewhere is developing a clip-on camera, and almost as much of a certainty that their business will be nuked when Apple adds a camera in the Mk II model.

There's more scope for selling upmarket home automation and music control systems at a premium price than there is for micro-apps.

Media and content will be pushed aggressively. iTunes will start bigging up TV and movie content even more than it does already. The iPad makes an interesting hand-held TV, but I'm not sure how comfortable it is to watch an entire movie on one.

Convergence is inevitable. My guess is we'll see a clamshell two-screen MacBook or MBP within the next three years, possibly running iPhone OS in emulation on OS X. (This is easy to do - it's practically a solved problem.) There might be scope for a hybrid iPad 'keyboard' to be bundled with an iMac as a remote control/general useful thing. And so on.

Fully converging OS X with iPhone OS is actually quite difficult. I'll be surprised if Apple works out a way to do that without collateral damage.

It's also difficult to see how the iPad features can be rolled back into the iPhone. This seems to be a stated goal - the idea is to have a single universal platform - but some of the features rely on more screen space. It's going to be interesting to watch what happens there.

Different computing

The current version of the iPad fails to change computing. The big draw at the moment is social computing - esp. real-time interactions with friends and family - and without multitasking, the iPad and iPhone can't handle them properly.

Browsing and email are fine as far they go, and you can Twitter and Facebook on the web, more or less. But you can't do that while reading a book or browsing a virtual magazine, which is a significant limitation.

Apple's mistake has been to try to enforce its top-down command-and-control policy onto the market, instead of looking more thoughtfully at what people are doing with computers now. A true killer app would allow more simultaneity and social sharing. Even on a small screen, it should be possible to do more than one thing at once.

This matters because although social computing is often trivial, it could - potentially - have significant political and economic influence. Blog-storming - near-instant mass movements across blogs and social networks - has already have some impact. Potentially, the iPad, or something like it, could be used a platform for voting influence and social discussions.

But not as it stands now.

As for how well it does - I think it will sell comfortably, but not in truck loads, and I'm not completely convinced that it's going to be the winner Apple want it to be. It's close to being that, but it needs major changes before it gets there.

My worry is that if it doesn't sell in large enough numbers, Apple may kill it or roll the tech into its other product lines, rather than pushing it further to the point where it lives up to its potential - which would be a waste, because the potential to be something unusual, if not quite magical, is certainly there.

Display:
Specially for you:
Before the iPad was revealed last week, rumors circulated for a long time that Apple might be working on two different sizes for the screen of the device. Some had the device as small as 7″, others were saying it would go up to 10.6″. (The actual size of the iPad is 9.7″.) But the information we're hearing is that Apple is thinking much larger for another version of the product, maybe all the way up to the 15.4″ size that it currently uses for one version of the MacBook Pro. If you think that would be way too big for an iPad, we're also hearing that this other tablet would be quite a bit different from the one revealed last week. Namely, it could run a version of OS X much closer to the traditional version that runs on Macs.(TechCrunch)

Other than that, does anyone remember the general reaction to the iPhone from the media?

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 09:13:06 AM EST
The iMacBook rumour has been around forever - I was talking to a Mac magazine editor about it back in 2006.

It's not exactly a surprise to find the next round of rumouring happening at this point.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 09:16:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
iMacBook?? O, c'mon. What next, the iMcPhoneBook?

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 09:48:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That was apocryphal. I think we called it 'That big thing with the heavy glass' at the time.
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 10:01:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
So were you developing for Apple before iMac? Just curious.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 10:06:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
fine, perceptive diary/review, it'll be great to read pt 2 when you actually get your paw on one.

European Tribune - The Magical iPad

There might be scope for a hybrid iPad 'keyboard' to be bundled with an iMac as a remote control/general useful thing.

there you go, that's very cool. great for home music studios, you can schlep it anywhere, and use it as a controller/monitor. like a transport controller, but with ability to see the wave forms as they record.

someone on tv said it somes with google earth installed, so i see it as a traveller's friend as well.

does it have flash drive option? or is it the old whirring kind?

i am more optimistic this may be a big winner for apple, about half way between iphone/pods and laptops, but it will not spread with the same speed as the former, but possibly/probably still much faster than macbooks.

the fun part is guessing... the potential con- and pro-sumer market if they get the UI grannie-friendly is huge, as is the possible educational market, given the (to me) surprising success of the ipod in this -potentially massive- field.

my first second gen ipod lasted a month, i never got another one, too vulnerable, but my iphone is tough.

i don't find macbook pro's that well built, the dvd drives are crap. does the ipad have a dvd drive readwrite?

perhaps this is a reconnoitre action, and if it rolls out ok, they'll add a shopping list of extras like video/camera, stereo mikes, phone, you name it. i hope it has a sound out jack to hook it up to good speakers, fr'example.

if it is as tough as iphones are (they'll sell jackets for them for sure), then it's going to steal some of their laptop market, but there's even a slim chance it outsells either or both, in the fullness of time.

good analysis of the social aspect. i like all your points, especially the window that pops open to tell you something then goes away.

i wonder if they'll be jailbroken, hacked, and if there'll be a slew of the first gen ones on the second hand market in a couple of years, when mk2 and 3 are out.

ironically i don't see a need for one in my life right now, though i do lust a little to feel one out.

maybe in a couple of years i can see trading in the iphone for nofrills nokia -and decent battery life-, and getting one of these babies to my bosom for the fun-app and edu-lightweight reader factors, or as mentioned above, a seriously cool wireless studio controller, if that worked well.

as it is the apps are cute on the iphone, but the battery life while using dem apps is south of pitiful, so it's a 10 for travelling platform goal and access, while a 4 for execution.

having to stay hooked up to AC/DC in order to play with it kinda deflates the portability angle.

o yeah, and since you got more -useless- back acreage than yer ipods, put a freakin' PV cell or 4 on it, even if it took two hours of charge in full sunlight to give you an hour of gaming/whatever.

between gaming, ed, lowtech UI, travel and freerange wifi node for intra or internet use, there are many directions/markets that it could run to, and swiftly at that, as the success of the whole line or (global) brand is incrementally snowballing.

synergy, baby!

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 03:55:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
  1. Face-to-face gaming. The iPad is big enough for a board game face-to-face.

  2. Books are a side issue. Jobs introduced them as such.

  3. Your view of iPhone development is weird.

Your technical conversation is also weird. Note that the iPhone multitasks perfectly well, for a start. It's just that normal apps aren't allowed to do so. Jailbroken phones can allow apps multitask. As it turns out I can't read a book and facebook at the same time, or read two books at once. Push notifications seem to deal with the issues you're talking about - I'm not sure, because the last thing I need is Twitter or Facebook bothering me when I'm trying to do something else. (Tests: yup, Facebook will bug the crap out of you with messages everytime something happens. Let's turn that off again right away.) A neater interface than the dialog box that pops up on an iPhone would be nice (something like Growl), but that's another issue.

I don't understand your conversation about "social computing": you know the iPad will have  a Facebook app and inummerable Twitter apps at launch, right? The question is how fast can you switch from one to the other. As it is most people seem to run their browsers full-screen: they don't use multi-tasking anyway. I have a hard time stopping some clients closing the browser completely to check something in their e-mail on a PC. Reports are that switching is fast enough. It's fast enough on an iPhone - on which I already do everything you've talked about.

The underlying OS on an iPhone isn't miles away from traditional Mac OS X - it's mostly the interface layer that is different. The point being that a traditional windows interface works with pointer and keyboard, not with a touchscreen.

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 09:37:03 AM EST
Yes, I know the iPhone multitasks perfectly well. I also know that it's possible to make apps that multitask on the standard SDK, or at least run in the background, without jailbreaking.

Apple won't let you sell those apps through the store. It's a political issue. Currently if you have the App Store, which Apple seems to quite like, you can't have apps that multitask.

What's strange about this, exactly? It's one of the single most reliable criticisms of the iPad. It also happens to be true. I happen to want a Twitter client that can be set to foreground itself when a message comes in, or stays hidden when I don't. This is not an unreasonable requirement.

As for social computing - no, you're right, you don't understand the conversation.

A lot of other people do. I'd guess many of them are younger than either of us.

But since it's not clear, I'll spell it out - social computing means full-time contact with friends, family and co-workers. Full-time means that you can message casually, gossip, collaborate, and exchange text, video, photos, music, and other media near-instantly, from any location, without being tied to a desktop.

It also means that instead of being a slightly weird geeky adjunct to the real relationship, it becomes a seamless feature of the f2f relationship. It's not a substitute or a poor imitation, it is the relationship, or at least a significant part of it.

What's happened so far is that there platforms for all of these options, but they don't work together. You can share photos on Flickr, videos on YouTube, and text via SMS, Twitter, longer text via blogs, and so on.

People like all of these options. They'll like them more when they can do more of them at the same time in a single environment.

The iPad could be good for that, but currently it isn't.

It's about building networks of attention, not applications that do one social thing.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 10:00:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Then why do you say multitasking is a technical problem due to the underlying programming model?

But since it's not clear, I'll spell it out - social computing means full-time contact with friends, family and co-workers. Full-time means that you can message casually, gossip, collaborate, and exchange text, video, photos, music, and other media near-instantly, from any location, without being tied to a desktop.

Really? Shit. I must get me some of this Internet stuff. What is this twitter you speak of? Facebook? I've never heard of it.

I said 'I don't understand your conversation about "social computing"' not that I don't understand about "social computing". I'm living that dream, baby.

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 10:08:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
multitasking is a technical problem

I suspect, "multitasking" refers to parallel processing speed/capacity limitations in the hardware as well as SDK parameter limitations on processor calls.

The human factor on optimal device "multitasking" capabilities is another, entirely amusing subject.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 10:14:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The SDK constraints are justified in terms of hardware resource constraints. However, the main uses of multitasking TBG identifies are available, though I don't think the interface is up to much: intrusive dialog box.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 10:24:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The SDK constraints are justified in terms of hardware resource constraints. Well, yes.

the main uses of multitasking TBG identifies are available: Well, yes, where "main uses" means application functionality (e.g. platform-dependent but probably "limited edition" versions of PC software.) though not necessarily sufficient storage media (e.g. local hard drive or remote server rental, ergo calls to).

Abandoning keyboard input and restricting output facilities (datatypes, protocols) are profound (perhaps justified) differentiating feature of the i* product line (pad, phone,"stereo") among all electronic devices. I think iPad is headed straight for Palm Hell. Or...

the interface is up to much: intrusive dialog box: Well, yes, subsequently. Interface development I think points primarily to adaption to peripheral hardware devices, which is what TBG mentions. Cannibal territory within corporate divisions.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 10:53:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Have you used an iPhone much?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 10:58:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Not at all. I use a garden variety cell phone. Worse, I don't exercise my speed dial rights.

I have employed Apple products in a variety of professional venues since 1988.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 11:01:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Er - no. You can have remote notifications and badging, which is how some Twitter clients work. But that relies on an external server on Apple's own network. This is fine for messaging, with very strict limitations, but it's not in any way real multitasking, and it's extremely limited, and locked to Apple.

You can do URL launching, which is the closest the iPhone gets to task switching. There's no support for foreground/background, no manual or automatic task/app switching, and no way to - say - leave an app running in the background with a timer so that it reappears at a fixed time.

There's no internal inter-app communication or messaging of any kind. Your app can talk to and get data from the official installed apps, up to a point, but it can't send messages to an arbitrary non-Apple app.

There's also the file sandboxing system, which means sharing data between apps is somewhere between difficult and impossible. (Although that's been loosened in the latest SDK. Kind of.)

There's certainly no concept of decentralised data or processing, which could have been far more interesting to develop for than something that doesn't implement programming ideas from twenty years ago.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 10:56:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Thank you.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 10:58:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
No there isn't - and the sandboxing is a pain in the ass. However, at least you don't have to worry about apps screwing up other apps, a trade-off I'm happy with on a Phone. As you point out this has changed a bit on the iPad.

What are your use-cases for background processing on an iPhone?

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 11:07:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Off the top of my head:

Background polling of notifications - you can run your own mini-server running board games, location updates, news, simple RSS, etc, without having to use push notifications.

Reminder date/time timer applications.

Background download and polling of useful stuff (let's say over WiFi only, to keep carriers happy.) Bulkier information would appear instantly, and you wouldn't have to wait for it to be updated when the app runs. Good for packaged content.

It's not hard to think of more specific sub-uses.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 11:30:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
First one is covered by push, if clunkily.

I don't know why not hooks for time related stuff. I suspect it'll come.

How would owners respond to a background app eating their battery? Which is Apple's argument. Less applicable to the iPad though - again I suspect some iPad restrictions will be loosened as hardware moves forward.

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 11:37:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Clunky is a problem because it changes cost of development from 'Interesting, maybe I'll do that' to 'Nah...'

I don't really get the battery argument. Apps don't have to be really, really busy unless they're doing useful stuff. You could set up a 'Give me a timeslice every five minutes' option and it would make no real difference to battery life.

This is how everyone else does it, so it's not as if it's not practical.

A lot of the time you have to do the processing and downloading anyway, sooner or later. All that happens now is it gets deferred until the app is run.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 11:46:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
How would owners respond to a background app eating their battery? Which is Apple's argument.

I don't want Steve Jobs' marketig strategy to dictate how much power I can chug out of the battery. It should be my choice whether on a particular full battery load I want to get 9h of web browsing or 90 minutes of World of Warcraft (or, in the social networking vein, Second Life). If some owners cannot understand that certain users will eat the battery faster than other why should the rest of us suffer for it?

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 04:19:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah, the joy of Apple products....

And, anyway, you couldn't get 90 minutes of WoW if you somehow attached five batteries to the thing.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 05:35:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Good luck getting WoW to even run on a device with no dedicated 3D rendering hardware.
by Zwackus on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 07:49:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
So, no Second Life either?

I think I'll stick to my MacBook until Steve Jobs gets the iPad right :P

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 07:52:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, yeah, there's that.  Plus it'd be a royal pain in the ass to use any special moves from the button on the bottom.

I could see it being enjoyable on an iPad with sufficiently powerful hardware.  Maybe even more so than a regular computer, since you could bring all sorts of hand gestures into it and get a kind of Wii-on-steroids feel.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 08:25:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
iThings do have graphical acceleration - there's a version of Open GL ES in there, running on rendering hardware.

What they don't have is the vast memory and disk space needed for textures, or the bandwidth for refreshes. Or the processor speed.

Or the battery life. :)

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 08:43:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thank you.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 09:16:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes. Indeed. :)
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 10:32:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I'll also point out that the kids - is "appeal to the young'uns" the logical fallacy of the Internet Revolution™? - are currently doing all that stuff through interfaces a lot more clunky than that of the iPad or iPhone.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 10:34:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
ThatBritGuy: You can share photos on Flickr, videos on YouTube, and text via SMS, Twitter, longer text via blogs, and so on.
People like all of these options. They'll like them more when they can do more of them at the same time in a single environment.
The iPad could be good for that, but currently it isn't.

Google Wave is.

La Chine dorme. Laisse la dormir. Quand la Chine s'éveillera, le monde tremblera.

by marco on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 06:18:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I have a dream. The API is written to convert all char data type to audio data type, all data I/O to stereo I/O. No one need ever type again. Everyone will speak into their own appliance. And the appliance will broadcast their words in 15 second chunks to subscribers of The Feed. So goes out The Word by one orifice and comes in all of The Words by the other orifice. Lo, the Killer Twitter App is born.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 09:58:50 AM EST
Here's my particular heresy in this the religious war of out time:

I want an iPad to which I can plug a USB keyboard (or connect to a bluetooth keyboard, I guess) and use as a MacBook - or maybe all I have to do is switch to "MacBook mode" and use a virtual on-screen keyboard.

That is, as long as I also need to own a laptop I won't buy a tablet. And I have wanted to have a tablet since I was the early tablet PC models ca. 2000. But I have waited 10 years so I can wait another 5.

What I don't want is to have to have an iPod, iPhone, iPad, MacBook and iMac. Phone, tablet and desktop is good enough for me. And if I the tablet is powerful enough and can be used as a phone through a bluetooth headset, just the tablet.

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 10:10:26 AM EST
What do you want to do in Macbook mode?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 10:12:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Whatever you would want to do on a desktop - word processingTeXing, spreadsheetsR (anyway, does the iPad do Open Office?). How about lightweight development for the iPad on the iPad? Does the iPad run the iPad SDK?

Point being, I don't have a desktop, I have a MacBook which I use as a desktop replacement even thought it is not designed as one.

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 11:37:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I guess what I really want is something like this:



En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 11:53:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Having used 'em, flat, touch sensitive, keyboards are a PITA.  

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 02:46:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yep. Tactile feedback is an absolute requirement.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 03:09:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Then the iPad with a virtual on-screen keyboard is out. We're back to a USB/wireless keyboard requirement for the iPad.

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 04:15:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well I'll qualify that - I'm fine with it for low speed input (texting, in particular), but for full speed typing I have to have that feedback.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 04:19:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
What, you don't type at full speed when IM'ing?

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 04:59:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I do if I have a full keyboard. I was born too late to acquire similar "thumbing" skills for cell phones though. I'm old enough now to make bitter "when I was your age..." comments to the kiddies.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 05:09:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BTW, a new front in the price wars in the US opened at New Years. Price is The killer app, I say. Anyway, as you all know, Apple's loosening its grip on exclusive borrowed-interest strategies in markets around the world, e.g. AT&T, Vodaphone installed subscribers. This is a good thing... if Apple management truly expects to shed the tacky, faintly MSFT wardrobe acquired in recent years.

Oct 5, 2009: "The free application, Vonage Mobile, is available now for Research In Motion's (NASDAQ: RIMM) BlackBerry devices and Apple's (NASDAQ: AAPL) iPhones and iPod Touches. The app is designed to allows users to place low-cost international calls over Wi-Fi and cellular voice networks.... 'When developing Vonage Mobile, we focused on creating a more convenient alternative for customers who use calling cards or Wi-Fi-only applications," said Mike Tempora, senior vice president of product management for Vonage, in a statement. "Vonage Mobile is easy to get and use, and gives customers the best possible calling experience from a trusted provider.'

News of Vonage Mobile comes at a time when Apple's decision to keep the Google (NASDAQ: GOOG) Voice mobile app out of its App Store continues to spark controversy after an investigation by the FCC."

I noticed a Vonage calling plan tv spot with great interest the other day. That same evening, incidentally, carriers AT&T and Verizon, advertised 30% discounts on their respective entry-level, ersatz 3G plans.

30 Jan 2010: "Now, the new iPad/iPhone SDK, whose launch coincided with that of the new Apple tablet, has at last made good on this promise, reportedly opening up VoIP over 3G.  The company that broke the news, iCall, now has an updated app available that works with 3G.

ICall CEO Arlo Gilbert cheered the news, stating, "I applaud Apple's decision to allow iCall to extend its functionality beyond Wi-Fi and onto the 3G networks. This heralds a new era for VoIP applications on mobile platforms, especially for iCall and our free calling model. I hope that now more developers will begin using our VoIP as a platform to integrate VoIP into their applications."

Why is VoIP on the iPhone so promising?  Currently, iPhone voice plans from AT&T (in the U.S.) range from $39.99 for up to 450 minutes to $199.99 for up to 6000 minutes.  However, there's a single flat rate $30 fee tacked on for data.  Coupled with Google Voice (which gives you free SMS) you could now use your VoIP apps to cut your monthly bill to around $79.99 a month with unlimited SMS texts and local and long distance calls (sans MMS texts). Of course, fees will likely inflate that figure slightly. [Source: AT&T]"

heh

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 02:26:43 PM EST
Here's my particular heresy.

Integrate the mouse, keyboard, and electric pen into ONE device.  Visualize two hand rests each with four buttons resting under the fingers and a button on the side where the thumbs naturally rest.  That gives 8! combinations for alphanumeric input and 2! combinations for control.  The two hand rest cables connect to a junction box with a right/left handed switch so the user can define dominate hand position.  

The dominate hand controls the mouse and pointer/pen functions.  The user's other hand simply rests on the stationary controller, although in theory it could also be used as a dependent mouse, pointer, and pen functions - if a user wanted to Go There.

The junction box has a USB port so the user can easily switch between character sets, graphics, & so on either hard-dependent or on-demand.  As someone who uses Logic and mathematical symbols semi-regularly it would be REALLY nice to have these symbols easily and quickly available from the input device.

Practically speaking this heresy was developed in the mid-70s by IBM.  IIRC, again, it took between 6 to 8 weeks to learn how to use it.  After going through the hassle an immediate advantage was typing speed doubled and in some cases went beyond that.

Since it was patented by IBM, and they decided not to introduce it, you can forget ever seeing it on the market.  

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 02:40:55 PM EST
you can forget ever seeing it on the market

BWAH!

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 02:56:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Off the top of my head and based on decades -- Yes! decades -- of experience ;-) ...

A start-up could whip it out in about 2 years at a funding of ~$100 million.  $2 million for development, $10 million to get from Engineering Prototype to Product in the stores, and $88 million to fight-off the patent lawyers at IBM.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 03:31:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
88 super-large. You got that right.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 03:36:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Morse code is the easiest text input method for touch screens. There are several iPhone apps for it. They will be available for iSpad too.

And let's see if these iPads get hot enough to become iPans.


You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Feb 3rd, 2010 at 12:13:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
European Tribune - Comments - The Magical iPad

3. The Computer For Everyone Else

This is the perhaps the most interesting but also the most nebulous part of the proposal.
[...]

The idea that you can browse and send email - netbook stylee - without all the cruft and crap accumulated by a 'proper' OS is an interesting one. Up to a point. So - grandma can get online. That's good, right?


This idea has already been commented here or here  (with h/t to Ted Welch).

Frankly, I'm not buying it. Oh, my parents and your parents can certainly appreciate the ease of use and low maintenance nature of the iPad, but there are a couple of big problems here.

  • Keyboard: even when you do "just email & Facebook", you need to type some sentences (even if you're not writing letters on Word), and frankly, the older you get, the less patience you have for midget-sized tactile keyboards.

  • It's a pad: you're supposed to keep it on your lap? My mom would lay it on the table first thing -- and have to lean over it to read what she types. Not really convenient. (and you've already my mom has little tolerance to impractical things)

  • Web browsing: there is more and more video content: YouTube, DailyMotion; which codec are they using? Even sans video, a lot of web sites for casual browser use flash. Did Apple come with an app for that?

  • Oh, and my dad ditched his faithful 35mm camera and went digital a couple of years ago. So where's the USB?

The Mac Mini makes more sense in that respect.
by Bernard on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 03:47:44 PM EST
Think Marketing Strategy.

No USB means no competition with the Apple notebooks line.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 03:55:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
... or Mac, for those who prefer a big screen, a big keyboard and frankly don't care two figs about carrying their computer everywhere.
by Bernard on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 04:08:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That too.

Also.


She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 04:22:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I haven't taken the laptop out of the house in nearly 3 years. I gave up when continually faced by a hedge of laptop lids facing me round the meeting table. Barriers.

So I started taking a small moleskines pad with me and a pen. I occasionally whip it out with a  flourish and jot something down - otherwise it's attentive listening and observation of body language and reactions, and a better understanding of where the meeting is going.

Since I started this, there are fewer and fewer laptop lids in evidence. It's not me - it was just a fad, and now people have discovered for themselves that it was an unproductive fad.

Meetings! My father wrote a book about meetings, company secretary that he was. I shall have to diary my meetings thoughts, but not for a while. BTW after 40 years, I now accept that my father was right. Most meetings need to be structured to ensure the optimal decision-making process (Optimal for robust decisions, enduring motivation and cost). I suspect Frank S. might think the same.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Feb 3rd, 2010 at 12:27:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]

"Most meetings need to be structured to ensure the optimal decision-making process"

Absolutely, I sat through so many rambling meetings at Uni, the supposed chairman allowing people to wander off-topic, discussing things we'd been over  before and about which they had nothing constructive to add.  

Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.

by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Wed Feb 3rd, 2010 at 02:13:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"Let's have another meeting to find out why we're not getting any work done."

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Feb 3rd, 2010 at 02:38:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
... I think of the IBM PCjr, with a keyboard deliberately constrained to be a chiclet keyboard to avoid competing with the IBM PC, and then made wireless so you could keep it on your lap while the PCjr was hooked up to the TV but ...

... why would you want to keep it on your lap? ... because it was a bloody useless chiclet keyboard!

The Commodore 64 ate it for a mid-morning snack ... until of course Commodore Business Machines started to catch too much Marketing Strategy itself and was lapped by the market.


I've been accused of being a Marxist, yet while Harpo's my favourite, it's Groucho I'm always quoting. Odd, that.

by BruceMcF (agila61 at netscape dot net) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 06:39:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Bernard:
midget-sized tactile keyboards.

i like the iphone typepad in horizontal mode especially, i'm much faster on it that any other phone i had. if the ipad's is proportionally larger than the iphone's, or best expandable to measure, i don't really see a problem, especially if you can make it disappear when not in use. i see it more in nursing homes as a personal tv, sitting in a rack where it can be comfortably watched, takes up a lot less space than the customary little tvs like in hospitals everywhere now, and less of a writer thing, though the market for the more um, active user will be huge anyway..

the usb, yes dumb omission. whack in firewire and a slot flashcard reader too.

its success will depend a lot on its reliability. if it has a flakey side, that could kill it dead, as people expect a level of relative excellence and sturdiness to go with the apple prices. if it's a drop-it-once-it's-history toy, then....ppfffft.

cuz it's slotted for prime time, after its elder cousins' achievements, that's a high wire...

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 04:15:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Hands-on with the Apple iPad - it does make sense

January 28, 2010 By ANDY IHNATKO

Keyboard

I have to say that it's more touch-tappable than touch-typeable. Typing at my normal speed was ... unproductive. But if I slowed down, I could type very fast using both hands. It's fine for writing emails, but probably poor for writing an essay or a column. Nonetheless I'm certain that I could do a whole 800-word column on the virtual keyboard without suffering too much.

The virtual keyboard doesn't have to be as good as a real one, anyway. There are two options for mechanical keyboards: a keyboard dock that holds the iPad like an easel and incorporates a notebook-sized keyboard, and Apple's standard wireless Bluetooth keyboard.
...
Flash

Months ago, I installed a browser plugin for Safari called "ClickToFlash." It blocks all Flash content. You'll see a placeholder image in the webpage and if you want to view the content, give it a click and it'll load in. I have not noticed any drop in my ability to enjoy the Web. What I have noticed is that my browser is faster and more responsive, and that I can leave a couple of dozen tabs and windows up for weeks without having to force-restart my Mac.
...
Multi-tasking

the iPad (like the iPhone) doesn't multitask third-party apps. You can listen to music from the iPod app while you work on your mail, but you can't listen to music streaming from a Pandora client. But on an iPad, switching between two apps is lightning-fast and intuitive, and if it's anything like an iPhone, this "one third-party app at a time" policy will result in a far more stable computer.
An Android tablet does true multitasking. But this feature makes Android devices a little crashy, it slows down performance (sometimes to the point where you need to restart the device), and it really demands that you download and use a special app that does nothing but help you manage this herd of skittish and sometimes quite angry sheep.
These differences don't mean that the iPad is under-featured or that an Android-based tablet is so backward that it might as well have been made from sticks and dried animal skins. It's a difference in philosophy.
...
Most of my admiration for the iPad comes from the fact that I left that demo room with absolutely no complaints about the speed, comfort, or simplicity of my user experience.

http://www.suntimes.com/technology/ihnatko/2017907,ihnatko-ipad-hands-on-012810.article

Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.

by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 05:26:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The keyboard is probably going to be fine.  There'll be a bit of a learning curve, but it'll make sense.  The carrying case they're selling as an accessory looks like it'll do a lot for the angle of the thing while typing, too.

Jobs is right about Flash, in my opinion.  It's not great in Windows, but it's impressively bad in OS X.

The speed is a good selling point.  It looks like it's a good bit more fluid than the iPhone 3G.  Not sure about the 3GS, which felt much faster than the 3G.  But, still, speed makes a world of difference in the user experience, and these sound like fairly impressive chips.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 05:41:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Flash is out because Darth Jobs doesn't want anyone else's software interfering with his vision thing.

And also because HTML5 is coming soon.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 09:02:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
... like a Microsoft operating system release date. I remember when the Onion reported that Microsoft had bought 2001 and renamed it 2000v2, so that they could ship Windows2000 in 2000v2.

Of course, a big question is whether Google and Apple can come up with key parts that can draw broad based industry support before HTML5 reaches Candidate Recommendation stage, expected by some observers in 2012.

This is likely to be one reason why Flash is (finally) getting serious about working to get Flash 10.1 out on Windows Mobile, Palm Pre, Google Android, Symbian, and Blackberry platforms early this year, before HTML5 is able to settle on an open codec with reasonable performance and without submarine patent worries for its <video> tag.

I've been accused of being a Marxist, yet while Harpo's my favourite, it's Groucho I'm always quoting. Odd, that.

by BruceMcF (agila61 at netscape dot net) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 09:10:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'd assumed --beginning with Apple Store launch music and VoD-- that was all about Adobe-Apple DRM standards competition, ergo revenue share lock-in with "content" providers.

'course, now, Amazon product is straight up MP3...

long-tail, indie P2P music and VoD distribution...

and all that ripping shareware to subvert iTunes...

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 09:28:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There's also that outside of Windows, Flash has always been a bit cruddy.

And Apple is probably on the inside track ... Adobe has to get its roll out of Flash 10.1 to a broad range of devices right or they all end up migrating to "something else", which can't be Window's Flash-killer, and whatever "else" that is, Apple will support it to sidestep Adobe.

Meanwhile, as with Crunchyroll's iPhone app alpha, knowing that Apple will not support Flash, so that Flash 10.1 will not give an "easy road" into iPhone / iPod Touch, Crunchyroll's second system specific app after Boxee is Apple iPhone OS 3.0 (including iPod Touch and, I presume, automatically including the iSlab).

Knowing Apple's stance regarding Flash drives content provider's to put Apple-specific app development to the front of the queue.


I've been accused of being a Marxist, yet while Harpo's my favourite, it's Groucho I'm always quoting. Odd, that.

by BruceMcF (agila61 at netscape dot net) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 10:59:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Apple is on the inside track to the extent that one of the co-designers of HTML 5 works for Apple and is lead developer of Safari and WebKit.

So - not so much being on the inside track as owning the stadium and having a harem of enthusiastic cheerleaders.

Which is actually kind of annoying. Apart from bad implementation, which could easily be fixed, there's not much wrong with Flash. It's almost a standard. A lot of people use it and know it.

There's a lot wrong with HTML, especially if you want a simple way to do world class graphic design on the web. But instead of that, we're getting video and sound and animations. And stuff. In a moving standard that probably won't be finalised for another ten years - when it's already obsolete.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 11:19:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I meant inside track in the market - the inside track in the HTML5 development process when the co-editors are from Apple and Google is only here or there if HTML5 starts getting relied on in lieu of plugins, and well in advance of formal standardization.

The inside track in the market is that Adobe may have one shot to get it right, and even if they win Apple can still proceed without Flash, while if Adobe trips up, Flash can very easily get knocked out its present market position.


I've been accused of being a Marxist, yet while Harpo's my favourite, it's Groucho I'm always quoting. Odd, that.

by BruceMcF (agila61 at netscape dot net) on Wed Feb 3rd, 2010 at 11:13:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A portable games console. It's like a portable PSP3 or Nintendo or whatever, with a better interface. The games market has a narrow demographic, but it has obvious appeal as a games platform. Developers can see the benefits right away. Expect an explosion of games, and it wouldn't be completely surprising to see the iPad find a niche as a leeeeet games machine.

As an avid gamer, I have a few quibbles with this.

First off, Macs are not a gaming machines, by design.  None of the basic Macs come with gaming-level 3D hardware, or anything approaching it.  They have not been suitable for gaming since the early 90's.  The iPhone and iPad are different machines entirely, but that tradition says something.

The iPad will likely be capable of running anything in the casual games market, which is already quite large and growing.  This sector hits an enormous demographic range, from kids to older people, men and women alike, and so a solid success in the casual gaming market is nothing to sneeze at.  This has been Nintendo's strategy with the DS and Wii, to hit this market hard, and leave the hardcore market to the other players.  Were Apple serious about pursuing a gaming niche, they should really try to ally themselves with Nintendo.  Downloadable DS games on the iPad would be massively popular, I suspect.

However, I would be shocked if the iPad has 3D capabilities anywhere close to the PSP, let alone a proper gaming PC, XBOX 360, or PS3.  As such, it cannot and will not have any sort of serious gaming credibility.

by Zwackus on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 09:30:47 PM EST
On the other hand, as mentioned above, if they can make the iPad into a proper digital gaming table, and make Settlers of Cataan, Puerto Rico, etc. available and playable, it would be enough to get me to buy one right there.
by Zwackus on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 09:32:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'll tell you what I wanted it to be - two 7" displays, fold flat to one bigger display, both touch sensitive, so in netbook mode the bottom is the virtual keyboard the top is the display, in vertical mode its two pages of a book/report/catalog/manga at a time, folded flat its a bigger pad, closed there's nothing can scratch the screens.


I've been accused of being a Marxist, yet while Harpo's my favourite, it's Groucho I'm always quoting. Odd, that.
by BruceMcF (agila61 at netscape dot net) on Tue Feb 2nd, 2010 at 11:03:07 PM EST
Apple's mac os x is less secure than windows - The Inquirer

IF YOU BELIEVE Apple's marketing then you would think that the expensive fruity machines are more secure than PCs.

After all, most of the viruses out there are designed for the PC and Apple users hardly suffer from the problem. But this line of reasoning does not influence corporate IT managers who, were it true, would be trying to stave off hackers by installing shedloads of Apple gear.

However that's not the case. Most tell us that even if Apple gear was half the price it's just security by obscurity. A determined hacker who wanted to get into corporate systems would be though it like a knife through butter.

Tyler Reguly, a senior security research engineer with Ncircle told the newnewinternet that if you take a look at the two platforms, and the mindsets of the companies behind them, then the Windows PC wins hands down. He said that the Mac ships with more exploitable vulnerabilities already on a system when it is delivered. Further, Eric Johanson, a security researcher pointed out that the Mac OS X has far more published vulnerabilities per user than Windows.

However Apple is also actually more insecure because of the attitude of its customers. A computer's security, if it exists, is only as good as the user. Unfortunately in the case of the Mac the user is a smug, technologically illiterate person who believes they are invulnerable because they use a Mac. Such people randomly press buttons, visit sites that sensible people don't and download things carelessly because Apple's marketing tells them they are safe.

A recent Eset survey last year showed that when Apple users fell for phishing crime they tended to lose a lot more cash than a Windows PC user. The cynic in me thinks that if you spend a third more than you need to for your PC and think that the Ipad is a pretty neat idea then you are exactly the sort of mark that a phishing campaign is designed to reach.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Feb 4th, 2010 at 09:09:41 AM EST
Stowe Boyd - /message - Rackspace's Mike Mayo on Mac OS 11
Based on his experience with the iPad SDK, Mike Mayo is wondering about what it means for Mac OS 11:


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Feb 4th, 2010 at 01:14:19 PM EST
I do like the idea of regular people using a computer without having to think about file systems."

And more importantly, spending their time and energy thinking about work, or drawing, or music: not files and folders.

I had this idea that the desktop should always be a representation of the working directory...

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Feb 4th, 2010 at 07:42:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]


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