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Fukushima trouble headlines

by das monde Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 04:08:42 AM EST

Disheartening developments at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plants continue, as nuclear elements take on their own course. Is it getting too late for human responsibility?

IAEA Confirms Very High Levels of Contamination Far From Reactors

Today the IAEA has finally confirmed what some analysts have suspected for days: that the concentration per area of long-lived cesium-137 (Cs-137) is extremely high as far as tens of kilometers from the release site at Fukushima Dai-Ichi, and in fact would trigger compulsory evacuation under IAEA guidelines.

The IAEA is reporting that measured soil concentrations of Cs-137 as far away as Iitate Village, 40 kilometers northwest of Fukushima-Dai-Ichi, correspond to deposition levels of up to 3.7 megabecquerels per square meter (MBq/sq. m). This is far higher than previous IAEA reports of values of Cs-137 deposition, and comparable to the total beta-gamma measurements reported previously by IAEA and mentioned on this blog.

This should be compared with the deposition level that triggered compulsory relocation in the aftermath of the Chernobyl accident: the level set in 1990 by the Soviet Union was 1.48 MBq/sq. m.


Radiation levels in seawater off Japan plant spike to all-time highs

The amount of radioactive iodine-131 isotope in the samples, taken Wednesday some 330 meters (361 yards) into the Pacific Ocean, has surged to 4,385 times above the regulatory limit. This tops the previous day's reading of 3,355 times above the standard -- and an exponential spike over the 104-times increase measured just last Friday.

Officials have downplayed the potential perils posed by this isotope, since it loses half of its radiation every eight days.

Yet amounts of the cesium-137 isotope -- which, by comparison, has a 30-year "half life" -- have also soared, with a Wednesday afternoon sample showing levels 527 times the standard.

Fukushima Workers Face Risk of Uncontrolled Reactions

The United Nations' nuclear watchdog agency warned that a potential uncontrolled chain reaction at Japan's crippled Fukushima atomic power plant could cause further radiation leaks and increase the risk to workers.

A partial meltdown of fuel in the No. 1 reactor building may be causing the isolated reactions, Denis Flory, nuclear safety director for the UN's International Atomic Energy Agency, said at a press conference in Vienna.

Nuclear experts call these reactions "localized criticality." They consist of a burst of heat, radiation and sometimes an "ethereal blue flash," according to the U.S. Energy Department's Los Alamos National Laboratory website. Twenty-one workers worldwide have been killed by "criticality accidents" since 1945, the site said.

"We share the view with the IAEA that various phenomena are possible," Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said at a press conference today in Tokyo. "At the same time, the organization said they don't have clear signs that show such a phenomenon is happening."

Pumping Operation Stops at Plant

Workers stopped water-pumping operations near the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear-power plant's No. 1 reactor Wednesday after the container they were using filled up, part of the juggling act recovery workers are performing as they look for places to store increasing amounts of water.

Pumping operations at the No. 2 reactor facility--a much bigger concern because of the amount of radiation in the water there--faced continued delays, leaving toxic water in a nearby shaft still just three feet shy of spilling over into the ocean.

Meanwhile, officials recorded the highest radiation level yet in the ocean next to the damaged plant. The readings showed toxic water from an unknown part of the site was reaching the ocean, though government officials said they weren't sure from where, and marked a setback after ocean readings had fallen in recent days.

Workers Give Glimpse of Japan's Nuclear Crisis

Japanese Plant Had Barebones Risk Plan

Japan's nuclear nightmare set to run and run

Fukushima beyond point of no return as radioactive core melts through containment vessel

Japan nuclear crisis: evacuees turned away from shelters

Nuke crisis scares foreign buyers off seafood

Radiation Traces Found in U.S. Milk

Recommended links:

The Nature: Concerns over nuclear energy are legitimate

Club Orlov: Nuclear Meltdowns 101

Youtube: Chris Busby Explains Why Uranium Is Bad For You

[editor's note, by Migeru] Japan threads:

Display:
After adding one more alarming link, I wish to return to Curtis' film A is for Atom, that was discussed here. Inside the 21:00-29:00 time marks it pitches a pivotal moment in the history of nuclear industry. The first commercial GE and Westinghouse reactors were just oversized simplest reactors for submarines with little adaptation. Particularly, containment problems under cooling failure were quickly foreseen. The Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards had warned the Atomic Energy Commission in 1966 that new reactors near NY and Chicago should have improved designs, and their letter should had been published by law. But the AEC chairman Seaborg saw too much trouble for the industry, and vowed to negotiate privately - but pushing for a change in the whole manufacturing system was not a feasible approach for him. The industry bluffed that they would stop selling reactors if forced to deal with containment issues seriously. So basically, there is no prescription for Fukushima reactors now.
by das monde on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 04:23:11 AM EST
america adds 45 million pounds of fuel rods to storage every year, stored in 77 locations.

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 03:08:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The most important news is this:

Japan may have lost race to save nuclear reactor | World news | The Guardian

Readings from reactor two at the site have been made public by the Japanese authorities and Tepco, the utility that operates it.

Richard Lahey, who was head of safety research for boiling-water reactors at General Electric when the company installed the units at Fukushima, told the Guardian workers at the site appeared to have "lost the race" to save the reactor, but said there was no danger of a Chernobyl-style catastrophe.

..."The indications we have, from the reactor to radiation readings and the materials they are seeing, suggest that the core has melted through the bottom of the pressure vessel in unit two, and at least some of it is down on the floor of the drywell," Lahey said. "I hope I am wrong, but that is certainly what the evidence is pointing towards."

No. 2 is the one where radiation level readings inside the drywell have gone up.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 04:54:47 AM EST
Japan may have lost race to save nuclear reactor | World news | The Guardian

The major concern when molten fuel breaches a containment vessel is that it reacts with the concrete floor of the drywell underneath, releasing radioactive gases into the surrounding area. At Fukushima, the drywell has been flooded with seawater, which will cool any molten fuel that escapes from the reactor and reduce the amount of radioactive gas released.

Lahey said: "It won't come out as one big glob; it'll come out like lava, and that is good because it's easier to cool."

The drywell is surrounded by a secondary steel-and-concrete structure designed to keep radioactive material from escaping into the environment. But an earlier hydrogen explosion at the reactor may have damaged this.

"The reason we are concerned is that they are detecting water outside the containment area that is highly radioactive and it can only have come from the reactor core," Lahey added. "It's not going to be anything like Chernobyl, where it went up with a big fire and steam explosion, but it's not going to be good news for the environment."



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 04:56:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The data in question is available here. In the latest reports however, radioactivity in the drywell and wetwell of No. 2 sank (from 40.5 to 39.6 Sv/h resp. from 1.35 to 1.26 Sv/h).

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 05:12:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I made the following diagram out of all the reactor interior radiation levels given (DW = drywell, WW = wet well or suppression chamber):

It would appear that No. 1 should be much ore of a concern continued meltdown-wise. Checking other parameters for the last big uptick in drywell radioactivity, core and drywell pressures and temperature also went up, so this wasn't simply due to venting.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 06:05:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Wait - what? Those are full Sv/hr?
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 06:30:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
yep. dry well and wet well readings

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 06:34:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
[speechless]
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 06:45:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
{more than usual} ?

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 06:52:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I could see problems with striping of paint and destruction of electronics at those levels. Do we have reference levels for what "normal operation" levels were.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 08:20:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well I can't see any anywhere, but You would think that normally they would need to be low enough for people to work round them, charging the reactor, swapping out fuel etc. and with radiation at that level, you wouldnt really want a pool of spent fuel around either, unless that is a level under the bowels of the machine where people dont go.  (although we do know theres at least one cable run underneath, and  the bit where we had people step in puddles so there has to be some form of access down below)

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 08:36:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Do people work inside the containment, except for maintenance? Also worth to note: the drywell is not normally filled with water.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 01:34:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
How does the radiation make the paint stripe?
by njh on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 06:54:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
This was reported from Chernobyl. My surmise is that at sufficiently high radiation levels the chemical structure of the paint is attacked and it is basically burnt or evaporated off the surface. Each element responds differently to various types of radiation. Some may vaporize, some may heat up to the point that the chemical bonds are broken and/or oxidized or reduced.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 10:27:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I had a friend who used to supply specialised paints to the nuke industry. I remember him saying that if you look old paint on a house it bubbles and cracks, in a normal working nuke plant, the paint on surfaces decays at five times the rate, depending on the  exposure. However everything is painted to keep moisture away from metal surfaces, as rust absorbs radiation more than plain steel, and is much harder to decontaminate. At vastly increased radioactive rates you'll get much more cracking and bubbling as impurities occur and you get  breakdown of some molecules in the paint matrix.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 06:47:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
wow!
by njh on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 05:09:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
How does fire make the paint stripe?

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 05:23:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I found some pressure/temperature data and graphs for reactors 1,2,3 here.
by das monde on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 09:56:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Update:

In the dry well of No. 1, the radiation level went further up. However, drywell pressure dropped (from 0.230 to 0.210 MPa). As for the pressure vessel, temperatures dropped, while the two pressure sensors give different data, and the lower data dropped further while the higher one rose (I guess the second device is malfunctioning).

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 04:42:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
40 Sv per hour? Jesus fucking christ. That's roughly what standing next to the exploded reactor in Chernobbyl gave you. In other news, I hade a nightmare last night of being exposed to half a Sievert. No radiation poisoning detected in the dream at least.

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.
by Starvid on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 08:59:36 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Dream on!

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 11:18:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
When the Fukushima Meltdown Hits Groundwater | Hawai`i News Daily
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The deposit must be in the form of a money order made out to the inmate's full committed name and complete eight-digit register number. Details. When the Fukushima Meltdown Hits Groundwater March 27, 2011 By Dr. Tom Burnett

Fukushima is going to dwarf Chenobyl. The Japanese government has had a level 7 nuclear disaster going for almost a week but won't admit it.

The disaster is occurring the opposite way than Chernobyl, which exploded and stopped the reaction. At Fukushima, the reactions are getting worse. I suspect three nuclear piles are in meltdown and we will probably get some of it.

If reactor 3 is in meltdown,  the concrete under the containment looks like lava. But Fukushima is not far off the water table. When that molten mass of self-sustaining nuclear material gets to the water table it won't simply cool down. It will explode - not a nuclear explosion, but probably enough to involve the rest of the reactors and fuel rods at the facility.

Pouring concrete on a critical reactor makes no sense - it will simply explode and release more radioactive particulate matter. The concrete will melt and the problem will get worse. Chernobyl was different - a critical reactor exploded and stopped the reaction. At Fukushima, the reactor cores are still melting down. The ONLY way to stop that is to detonate a ~10 kiloton fission device inside each reactor containment vessel and hope to vaporize the cores. That's probably a bad solution.

A nuclear meltdown is a self-sustaining reaction. Nothing can stop it except stopping the reaction. And that would require a nuclear weapon. In fact, it would require one in each containment vessel to merely stop what is going on now. But it will be messy.

please let there be a better way...

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 08:24:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Blowing a damaged reactor up with a 10 kT device is an absolutely absurd idea. Not only will it vaporize the core and the spent fuel and spread it over the neighbourhood Chernobyl-style, this kind of groundburst will contaminate vast amount of dust which will turn into fallout. Oh, not to mention the vast physical destruction created by nuclear weapons.

Basically, what is this guy smoking, and can I please have some?

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.

by Starvid on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 09:06:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
What do they mean by "save the reactor"? Be able to reuse it again? That's not even been part of the "race" for at least a week (for the serious people, that is - the rest of us have known the reactors were a writeoff for at least two weeks).

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 05:01:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The 3rd article I listed already mentions meltdowns at the No 1 reactor.

My last link is the video of Prof. Christopher Busby. He is active with interviews these days. In the following clip (watch from 2:20) he envisions three scenarios, two of them very bad, and the most likely is one of those. That likely scenario: the radiation at the plant gets so high that work is abandoned (and the work is already desperate nonsense), leaving a China syndrome meltdown (without Hollywood actors to save us) and the stuff would just (mainly) poison the northern half of Japan. But more terribly, MOX plutonium may cause a critical reaction - and that would be an unimaginable problem for the whole globe. And the milder scenario is that they manage to pour water forever.

by das monde on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 05:18:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The 3rd article I listed already mentions meltdowns at the No 1 reactor.

But there is no suggestion that it melted through the pressure vessel into the containment vessel (the drywell part), and indeed that's the one reactor still under pressure.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 06:09:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The problem with Christopher Busby is that he's hardly an impartial opinion. According to the wiki article you cite: Busby is the author of two self published books on cancer incidence in Wales, Wings of Death and Wolves of Water, and according to CERRIE "articles and research papers on low level radiation." The books were criticised in papers published by the Journal of Radiological Protection , which described their analysis as erroneous in consequence of various mistakes. According to the editor-in-chief of the journal, and fellow CERRIE committee member, "much of Chris Busby's work is self-published and difficult to access; he seems mainly to avoid publication in the recognised scientific literature, which presents difficulties for a proper review of the evidence underlying his conclusions."

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 04:30:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Who are the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Radiological Protection, and the "fellow CERRIE committee member"? The editor-in-chief is Richard Wakeford, and here is what Busby himself saying about him and some other colleagues:
What these people have in common is ignorance. You may think a professor at a university must actually know something about their subject. But this is not so. Nearly all of these experts who appear and pontificate have not actually done any research on the issue of radiation and health. Or if they have, they seem to have missed all the key studies and references. I leave out the real baddies, who are closely attached to the nuclear industry, like Richard Wakeford, or Richard D as he calls himself on the anonymous website he has set up to attack me, "chrisbusbyexposed".

I saw him a few times talking down the accident on the television, labelled in the stripe as Professor Richard Wakeford, University of Manchester. Incidentally, Wakeford is a physicist, his PhD was in particle physics at Liverpool. But he was not presented as ex- Principle Scientist, British Nuclear Fuels, Sellafield. That might have given the viewers the wrong idea. Early on we saw another baddy, Malcolm Grimston, talking about radiation and health, described as Professor, Imperial College. Grimston is a psychologist, not a scientist, and his expertise was in examining why the public was frightened of radiation, and how their (emotional) views could be changed. But his lack of scientific training didn't stop him explaining on TV and radio how the Fukushima accident was nothing to worry about.

Then he mentions George Monbiot, and gets so juicy:

So what about Wade Allison? Wade is a medical physics person and a professor at Oxford. I have chosen to pitch into him since he epitomises and crystallises for us the arguments of the stupid physicist. In this he has done us a favour, since he is really easy to shoot down. All the arguments are in one place. Stupid physicists? Make no mistake, physicists are stupid. They make themselves stupid by a kind of religious belief in mathematical modelling. The old Bertie Russell logical positivist trap. And whilst this may be appropriate for examining the stresses in metals, or looking at the Universe (note that they seem to have lost 90% of the matter in the Universe, so-called "dark matter") it is not appropriate for, and is even scarily incorrect when, examining stresses in humans or other lifeforms. Mary Midgley, the philosopher has written about Science as Religion. Health physicists are the priests.

An exciting fields for name calling.
by das monde on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 06:27:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
das monde:
Stupid physicists? Make no mistake, physicists are stupid. They make themselves stupid by a kind of religious belief in mathematical modelling. The old Bertie Russell logical positivist trap. And whilst this may be appropriate for examining the stresses in metals, or looking at the Universe (note that they seem to have lost 90% of the matter in the Universe, so-called "dark matter") it is not appropriate for, and is even scarily incorrect when, examining stresses in humans or other lifeforms.
That doesn't prevent Chris Busby quoting models done by a colleague of his who works at CERN on the effect of Uranium as an absorber and re-emitter of background radiation inside the body.

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 06:40:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
He is not entirely a hypocrite here, as he is basically saying:

whilst [math modelling] may be appropriate for examining the stresses in metals, [absorption and re-emission of background radiation] or looking at the Universe [even with the 90% punch] it is not appropriate for ... examining stresses in humans or other lifeforms.

So he has an excuse of distinguishing a couple of kinds of intelligence.

by das monde on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 06:52:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
No, but I think Frank Schnittger got the tone exactly right with his
anthropogenic background radiation exacerbation (none / 1) the new global warming, complete with deniers
This is so uglily political it's not even funny.

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 07:05:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Crank alert..

He makes me think of Helen "Crazy" Caldicott and her strontium baby-teeth road-show.

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.

by Starvid on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 09:11:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Seems it was Joseph Mangano who ran that road show (and claimed that nuclear power plants give you "Breast Cancer, AIDS, Low Birthweights" etc. But anyway, you get my meaning.

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.
by Starvid on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 09:18:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Seriously doubt "crank alert" applies to Dr. Caldicott. Nor to the debate over the literature from Belarus, Ukraine and Russia.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin
by Crazy Horse on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 02:12:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Here is a video of the Monbiot - Caldicott death match, excepted down below.
by das monde on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 02:27:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Here's a single-issue blog (it consists of exactly one blog post, on Chris Busby)

Chris Busby Exposed | Just another WordPress.com site

Chris Busby Exposed Posted on March 11, 2008 by junksciencewatch   CHRIS BUSBY EXPOSED  http://chrisbusbyexposed.spaces.live.com

"Chris Busby"

Have a look at some of these links which expose the ineptitude and conduct of Chris Busby, so-called "scientific" advisor to, and aspiring MEP for, the Green Party. 



Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 05:55:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
So that is the anonymous website of Wakeford, as Busby claims. The style is rather vapid, and the shot at the Cancer Incidence Temporality Index defined (by a misprinted formula) as 1 in this article abstract is cheap enough for anonymity. But right, Busby is not a paragon of diligence, even if inconvenient still.
by das monde on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 07:19:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
 The Oil Drum - Fukushima Dai-ichi status and prognosis

NHK Just broadcast an interview with a TEPCO worker at the plant. He says that TEPCO is not providing individual dosimeters to all workers. TEPCO admitted this was the case but said that they only sent in workers to low radiation dose areas without individual dosimetsrs. The worker said he would only reliably know what dose he was receiving if he was close to others with dosimeters.

TEPCO also said that they didn't have enough for everyone as many at the plant were destroyed by the explosions. That doesn't sound like a valid excuse.

<snip>

No, that excuse doesn't hold water at all. There aren't spare dosimeters at other reactor sites? The JSDF doesn't have any? They can't ask the US for some?

There were reports back when the firefighters first entered the plant that the chief in charge told the others to ignore their dosimeters, or they wouldn't get anything done. He stayed with his men the whole time and monitored his dosimeter, rotating the crew in and out of the hottest areas, and picked up a year's worth of radiation himself. If the firefighters had them, why doesn't TEPCO have extras?



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 09:29:20 AM EST
NHK WORLD English

TEPCO to ensure radiation monitoring for workers

Tokyo Electric Power Company says it may postpone low priority work at the damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant to ensure radiation monitoring for workers.

TEPCO said on Thursday that the quake destroyed many radiation monitors and that only 320 out of the 5,000 it had prior to the disaster are now available.

The company said that in some work groups only leaders had monitors and that 180 workers had worked without devices on one day.

TEPCO said it may postpone low priority work so no employee has to work without a device.

It also said it will collect radiation monitors from other plants to minimize delays.

Friday, April 01, 2011 07:36 +0900 (JST)



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 03:23:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
NHK WORLD English

TEPCO reprimanded over sloppy radiation checks

Japan's nuclear safety agency has reprimanded Tokyo Electric Power Company over its failure to ensure the safety of workers at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant due to shortages of radiation monitors.

Some teams of workers had to share a radiation monitor, although they are supposed to have one each. Many monitors stopped working after the massive quake.

The agency told reporters on Friday that the practice is problematic. It instructed the plant operator to make sure that workers are able to check radiation levels.

TEPCO told the agency that it has obtained 420 radiation monitors so far. The company explained that work will be suspended if employees do not have their own monitors.

Friday, April 01, 2011 13:30 +0900 (JST)



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 03:24:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Fukushima plant groundwater likely contaminated despite data error | Kyodo News

Groundwater at the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant is highly likely to be contaminated with radioactive materials, even though its operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. is reviewing its analysis released late Thursday due to erroneous calculations, the government's nuclear safety agency said Friday.

The Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency said some of the analysis data on the groundwater presented by the utility known as TEPCO cannot be trusted due to the errors, casting doubts on the finding that the concentration of radioactive iodine in the water was 10,000 times the legal limit.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 03:50:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
WANTED: U.S. workers for crippled Japan nuke plant

A U.S. recruiter is hiring nuclear power workers in the United States to help Japan gain control of the stricken Fukushima Daiichi plant, which has been spewing radiation.

The qualifications: Skills gained in the nuclear industry, a passport, a family willing to let you go, willingness to work in a radioactive zone.

The rewards: Higher than normal pay and the challenge of solving a major crisis.

"About two weeks ago we told our managers to put together a wish list of anyone interested in going to Japan," said Joe Melanson, a recruiter at specialist nuclear industry staffing firm Bartlett Nuclear in Plymouth, Massachusetts, on Thursday.

So far, the firm has already signed up some workers who will be flying to Japan on Sunday.

Melanson said there will be less than 10 workers in the initial group. Others are expected to follow later, he added.

Plant owner Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO) has appealed to the nuclear industry outside of Japan for assistance as the crisis has spiraled beyond their control.

by das monde on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 03:31:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
   URGENT: Radioactivity 10,000 times the limit found from groundwater: TEPCO

A radioactive substance about 10,000 times the limit was detected from groundwater around the No. 1 reactor of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. said Thursday.

A Tokyo Electric official said the radiation level is ''extremely high.''



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 11:32:54 AM EST
How big is the aquifer?

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 11:43:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]


It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 11:52:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I mean how far inland does it reach.

How many wells and irrigation systems will be poisoned?

Can tainted water from an aquifer contaminate fertileland above it or is the natural flow only downwards?

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 11:55:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well I can see several maps of Aquifers out at sea from oil firms and CO2 sequestration ideas, but no maps on land.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 12:11:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The plant is basically at the shore, so the aquifer here might always have been saltwater or may have long since become a saltwater aquifer.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 01:16:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Radioactive substance exceeding limit found in beef in Fukushima Pref. | Kyodo News
The Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare, said 510 becquerels of radioactive cesium was detected in beef from Fukushima, above the 500-becquerel legal limit set under the food sanitation law.


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 12:01:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Retest finds no radioactive substances in Fukushima Pref. beef | Kyodo News

The health ministry said Friday a reexamination showed no radioactive substances in beef from Fukushima Prefecture where the nuclear power plant crippled by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami is located.

...The ministry said it is likely that the beef in question was never contaminated with radioactive material, adding that there may have been a problem in the initial examination process.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 08:54:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Fixored:

"The ministry said that there may have been a problem in the initial examination process somebody telling the unfortunate truth."

by asdf on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 12:01:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
High levels of radioactive iodine found in ground water 15 metres below #Fukushima nuclear plant, says operator TEPCO, from AFP

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 02:32:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
NHK WORLD English
TEPCO, operator of the plant, has been checking below-ground water on the advice of the Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan.

The company says radioactive water was detected beneath the ground near the turbine buildings of five of the 6 reactors. The remaining reactor, No. 4, could not be checked because it was blocked by debris.

TEPCO says radioactive substances dispersed into the atmosphere may have seeped into the soil through rain and sprayed water.


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 03:18:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Nature: Algae holds promise for nuclear clean-up
Organism's ability to distinguish strontium from calcium could help in dealing with nuclear waste.

Common freshwater algae might hold a key to cleaning up after disasters such as Japan's Fukushima nuclear accident, scientists said yesterday at a meeting of the American Chemical Society in Anaheim, California.

The algae, called Closterium moniliferum, are members of the desmid order, known to microbiologists for their distinctive shapes, said Minna Krejci, a materials scientist at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. But the crescent-shaped C. moniliferum caught Krejci's eye because of its unusual ability to remove strontium from water, depositing it in crystals that form in subcellular structures known as vacuoles -- an knack that could include the radioactive isotope strontium-90.

by das monde on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 11:39:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by das monde on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 12:22:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I have been meaning to do that overlay for some time.

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 06:23:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Haven't we already seen it here?
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 08:51:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I recall posting the Chernobyl fallout pattern, but not the overlay on Japan's map.

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 09:03:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
What if the Ukraine is swung round by about 160 degrees clockwise?  Not good news for Tokyo. All down to the direction the wind blows
by LondonAnalytics (Andrew Smith) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 08:10:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Very true, but the maps gives us an idea of just how small and densely populated Japan is.

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 08:21:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The wind direction is rather fitting so far, and for what I heard, that seasonal wind direction will hold for another month or two.
by das monde on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 08:28:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well the BBCs Tokyo Weather forecast is for the wind to blow towards the east On Sunday, with light rain, then strengthening and swinging south on Monday.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 08:43:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
About one day in ten thousands it blows from Ukraine to Sweden. Just happened to be one of those in april 1986.

So even though it is likely that the seasonal patterns hold, you may not want to gamble something important on it.

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!

by A swedish kind of death on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 12:17:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Given the prevailing wind and weather patterns for Japan this graph would likely be shifted significantly north and east in its cumulative contamination weighting, with much of the contamination falling on the ocean.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 11:10:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
But that will change if the plant is still radioactive by the summer.

Other difference between Ukraine/Belarus and the Honshu island is the relief. Radiation will be focused in valleys around Fukushima, and the Japan Sea side would be less contaminated. You would also want to buy fish only on that side.

by das monde on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 11:16:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
More precisely, it will depend on whether the plant is still emitting radioactive particles by summer. It will certainly be radioactive for years.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 12:48:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A few hundred tons of boron-impregnated concrete will solve the problem, maybe...
by asdf on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 12:05:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
When the Fukushima Meltdown Hits Groundwater | Hawai`i News Daily

In fact, they have no idea WHAT they are doing. The idea seems to be to keep the problem from getting worse - but what they are actually doing is holding it in the worst situation possible - right between a full meltdown and a temporarily stopped meltdown. They will have to pour fresh, deionized water into all of those containments, essentially forever, just to hold what they have now - and that radioactive water has to go someplace. Trust me, they cannot convert destroyed reactors from light to heavy water reactors. After all the ships have been irradiated by hauling it into the middle of the Pacific and dumping it, there won't be any more ships - and there won't be any more fish. But the reactor will still be there dumping radiation into the water.

Since it is remotely possible to go around collecting fuel rods that haven't melted together yet, they will probably try to do that robotically at some point. They might get a hundred or so, but most of them are melted together, at least partially, because their pools of cooling water evaporated.

But the reactor cores are not going anywhere. They have melted down, also at least partially, and they are sitting in huge, cracked, concrete containment bunkers which didn't contain them.

existential enough yet?

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 07:55:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
When he says
Anyway, here is the information that the US doesn't seem to want released. And here is a chart that might help with perspective.
he's linking to this simulation, forgetting to mention that the units of Becquerel/m3 are thousands of times smaller than background radiation.

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 08:01:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
And dumping the contaminated water far out in the Pacific is FAR from the best solution. It is possible to extract most of the contamination from the water. A reverse osmosis plant designed for desalinization would probably do an excellent job, but this likely will end its usefulness as a source of fresh water. And there are likely other solutions cheaper than buying a desalinization plant. I recall that there were plants on site at Fukushima that served to decontaminate water, but have no idea of the throughput.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 11:46:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Given the cognitive Happy-Happy La-La-Land when they built the place I doubt the on-site throughput is much larger than normal operating needs.  

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 01:12:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Even that would help.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 01:25:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It would help - for a while - no question.

I note, eventually, the RO membrane gets clogged and has to be cleaned or replaced.  Since these systems are not generally designed to filter sea water I'd bet the operational time and volumes wouldn't be all that great, each time the membrane is pulled it has to be checked to ensure it's working properly, if not replacement membranes have to be stalled (and where are they going to get 'em?,)  & etc. & blah-blah.

Plus if you've got people doing that they aren't doing something else that may be more important?

And it is questionable the system is still functional.

If it is functional the Incident Commander may be keeping in reserve for some very good reason(s).  One reason to withhold an asset is to give yourself the ability to react/respond to the unexpected.  

And it's possible they still haven't faced-up to the situation and are more interested in playing Save-Your-Face fiddlefuck games than dealing with the situation.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 02:19:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Since these systems are not generally designed to filter sea water

Desalinization plants? If it will get rid of sodium and potassium chloride it will certainly block uranium and cesium particles or compounds. And clogging the filters with such contaminants would be the point, along with generating a much larger volume of relatively clean water which could be discharged into the ocean, or reinjected into the reactor cores for cooling. But the most immediately practical plan would be to make arrangements to use an existing RO facility and to pay for replacement fresh water via tankers for that portion of the plant devoted to decontamination along with paying for replacement or refurbishment of the contaminated RO equipment.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 03:23:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
 npr - Bird's-Eye View Of Japan's Stricken Nuclear Plant Shows Vast Damage  

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 01:12:27 PM EST
 KYODO - Man arrested after breaking into Fukushima Daini plant premises  

An unemployed man from Tokyo was arrested Friday after allegedly intruding by car into the Fukushima Daini nuclear power plant premises, near the radiation-leaking Fukushima Daiichi plant in Fukushima Prefecture, police said.

Hikaru Watanabe, 25, from Shinjuku Ward, allegedly broke through the western gate of the Daini plant around 1:10 p.m. Thursday, before driving inside its premises for about 10 minutes, the plants' operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. said, adding that no one was injured in the incident.

Watanabe was arrested on suspicion of unlawful entry and property destruction, the local police said, adding that he admitted to the allegations. The purpose of the intrusion remains unknown.

The police, who were alerted to the incident and went to the scene, asked the suspect to voluntarily go with them for questioning. The vehicle and the suspect underwent a radiation decontamination process before being taken to a police facility, they said.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 01:42:31 PM EST
 Asia One   Japan right-winger crashes through nuclear plant gates

TOKYO - A man driving what appeared to be a right-wing propaganda loudspeaker truck on Thursday crashed his vehicle through the gates of a Japanese nuclear plant and was arrested by police, officials said.

The man first drove to Japan's disaster-struck Fukushima Daiichi (No. 1) plant, was turned back, and then rammed the vehicle through the gates of its sister plant, Fukushima Daini (No. 2), in the early afternoon.

The driver fled after spending about 10 minutes inside the Daini plant, said a spokesman for the agency, Yuichi Sato.

Police tracked him down and detained him about two hours later, Sato told AFP. "His identity, motive and affiliation are not immediately clear," he said.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 02:42:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
 KYODO - Groundwater at nuclear plant 'highly' radiation-contaminated: TEPCO  

More signs of serious radiation contamination in and near the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant were detected Thursday, with the latest data finding groundwater containing radioactive iodine 10,000 times the legal threshold and the concentration of radioactive iodine-131 in nearby seawater rising to the highest level yet.

Radioactive material was confirmed from groundwater for the first time since the March 11 quake and tsunami hit the nuclear power plant on the Pacific coast, knocking out the reactors' key cooling functions. An official of the plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. said, ''We're aware this is an extremely high figure.''

The contaminated groundwater was found from around the No. 1 reactor's turbine building, although the radiation level of groundwater is usually so low that it cannot be measured.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 01:44:32 PM EST
evacuation numbers if exclusion zone expanded


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 02:28:46 PM EST
What I take from this is:

  1.  they don't have anything under control

  2.  pouring water is a palliative

  3.  nobody has a handle on probable outcome


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 03:03:52 PM EST
Now that the radiation levels are manageable they should be burying the place in boric acid.

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 04:08:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It might be safer and longer lasting to cover them with pellets of borosilicate glass made with B10. Borosilicates are sometimes used as control rods. If there are leaks it would be more likely to remain and it could always be wet down with water.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 05:36:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oil Drum: What do we think we know for sure?

  1. The Japanese government have warned of a grave nuclear incident on a number of occasions.

  2. The status of the reactors, fuel pools and dispersion of radioactive materials continues to get worse, not better.

  3. There are perhaps 7 or 8 reactor loads of fuel in play compared with a single load at Chernobyl and 4 or 5 of those are outside of containment in badly damaged spent fuel pools.

  4. This report suggests that daily release of radioactive 131I and 137Cs is running at around 73% and 60% of Chernobyl respectively.

  5. The Chernobyl fire burned for 8 to 10 days whilst Fukushima Dai-ichi has been emitting radioactive material for around 15 days with no end in sight.

  6. There is a 30 km exclusion zone in place and thousands of residents have become refugees with little prospect of returning home in the near future.
by das monde on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 11:48:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I would say this:
The status of the reactors, fuel pools and dispersion of radioactive materials continues to get worse, not better.
we don't "know for sure". In particular, I don't think the status of the reactors (except maybe number 1) or pools is getting worse, but it is true radioactive dispersion continues. The biggest problem seems to be massive amounts of tainted water, now.

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 06:28:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I would worry whether, in an effort to limit the problem of how to deal with the radioactive water, they reduced the introduction of new water to the point where the temperatures got up again. Without good instrumentation and with no forced circulation, how do they know whether there are hot spots in the water that are right on the verge of boiling?
by asdf on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 12:09:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
 WNN - Further evacuations a possibility

Japanese authorities are considering the evacuation of more people in the area around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant after a more serious spot of radionuclide disposition was identified. Some restrictions on tap water are being lifted but discharges to sea continue.

Notification of this came from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), reporting the work of its monitoring teams in Japan.

Results from a range of soil samples taken at distances of between 25 kilometres and 58 kilometres from the power plant "indicate a pronounced spatial variability" of the total amounts of iodine-131 and caesium-137 deposited on the ground.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 04:23:15 PM EST
Japan must distribute iodine tablets now: expert | Reuters

(Reuters) - Japanese authorities grappling with a nuclear disaster must hand out iodine tablets now and as widely as possible to avoid a potential leap in thyroid cancers, the head of a group of independent radiation experts said.

France's CRIIRAD group says Japan has underestimated the sensitivity of the thyroid gland to radioactivity and must lower its 100 millisieverts (mSv) threshold for administering iodine.

Failure to do so quickly could lead to an even higher jump in thyroid cancer cases in coming years than is anticipated, Corinne Castanier told Reuters in an interview on Thursday.

"They should still do it (distribute iodine) now because the contamination continues but it will be less efficient. They have to limit the damage. It's not too late to act but they have to distribute them as widely and as fast as possible," she said.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 06:23:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It surprises me somewhat that the locals didn't have iodine pills at home even before the accident. We do it like that, and also special emergency radios which are solely designed to recieve evacuation orders.

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.
by Starvid on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 09:28:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Japan: migration to Osaka

Osaka has become a popular destination for many trying to get out of Tokyo, since it's the third largest city in Japan and less than a three-hour train ride away. Some major airlines, including Lufthansa and Alitalia, announced the re-routing of flights from Tokyo's Narita Airport to Osaka, turning the city into a major transportation hub.

Hotels have filled up in Osaka and some major U.S. chains, like the Ritz Carlton Osaka, are completely booked for at least the next week. "Since the earthquake happened, many residents in the Tokyo area are coming here to ask about accommodation for a few days or a week," said Sadako Hayakawa of the Osaka Tourism Bureau.

A number of foreign embassies shifted operations to Osaka last week. The normally quiet Austrian consulate in a small Osaka office was bustling with activity last Friday evening. Jutta Stefan-Bastl, Austrian ambassador to Japan, said the majority of the embassy's 30-person staff relocated to Osaka due to logistical reasons. They plan to stay put in Osaka until the end of April, she added.

A week after the earthquake, I talked with a friend running several hotels in Osaka. He told that the rooms are fully booked (at the highest rates) but about half of the rooms were empty, as people had trouble to reach Osaka by trains. Also many events (like weddings) were canceled.

by das monde on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 09:44:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
NHK WORLD English
On Wednesday, the IAEA said radiation levels twice as high as its evacuation level were detected in Iitate and it had advised the Japanese government to carefully assess the situation. But it did not give details of the substance or who carried out the measurement.

The UN nuclear agency revealed on Thursday that its judgment was based on data obtained from the Japanese authorities.

Japan's Nuclear Safety Commission said it sees no reason to change the evacuation zone and advice to stay indoors as its criteria are based on how much radiation people would be exposed to, and not the radiation level in the ground.

The IAEA also corrected the reading of 2 million becquerels of iodine-131 per square meter it announced on Wednesday. The revised figure is 20 million becquerels per square meter.


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 03:22:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Reuters quoting Mainichi newspaper - Japan govt to take control of Tokyo Electric Power via public fund injection  

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 06:13:33 PM EST
LDP considering grand coalition gov't with Kan's DPJ | Kyodo News

The largest opposition Liberal Democratic Party in a policy shift is considering an idea sounded out by Prime Minister Naoto Kan's ruling Democratic Party of Japan to form a grand coalition government following the calamitous March 11 earthquake and tsunami and ongoing nuclear crisis, LDP lawmakers said Thursday.

Katsuya Okada, the DPJ's No. 2 man who serves as secretary general, also sounded positive the same day about the idea of allowing other parties including the LDP in a new ruling bloc.

The LDP earlier sought to retake power by urging Kan to dissolve the lower house and call a general election but is now seeking to work as the DPJ's coalition partner to prioritize addressing the disaster, the lawmakers told Kyodo News.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 06:54:44 PM EST
Ministers divided over idea of grand coalition gov't with LDP | Kyodo News
The mixed views were presented as the LDP, which initially rejected the idea after being sounded out by the DPJ shortly after the quake, is now reconsidering, according to lawmakers of the party that had long-ruled Japan until being deposed by the DPJ in the 2009 general election.

Farm minister Michihiko Kano expressed his support for the idea, telling reporters that he personally believes such a government can be tolerated in light of the critical situation that Japan is facing.

...

Defense Minister Toshimi Kitazawa appeared cautious about the idea, however, saying in his news conference that while it is ''natural for both sides to think together on ways to overcome the crisis, forming a grand coalition for political purposes would not be able to gain public understanding.''



Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 06:30:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
NHK -  Japanese researcher has explained how radioactive substances that leaked from the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant have spread and reached Tokyo and other parts of the Kanto region.    

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 07:45:40 PM EST
view from camera on top of pemp arm into  reactor building

http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/13684184

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 09:17:09 PM EST
Too Little. Too Late?

Speaking Tuesday at a session of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, Peter Lyons, an acting assistant energy secretary in charge of nuclear power, said the United States was sending remote-controlled "radiation-hardened robotics" to Japan to help resolve the crisis at the Fukushima complex.

A robotic device that can withstand extremely high levels of radioactivity has been shipped to Japan from the Energy Department's Idaho National Laboratory, along with several cameras to take photographs inside the nuclear power plant, according to an Associated Press report.

Lyons said the Energy Department will also send about 40 employees and 7 metric tons of equipment necessary to carry out the work.

This might have been of some use on March 21, if there were some switches that needed to be thrown in a control room, etc. Perhaps it will still be of use. It is likely that there is a lot more in the 7 metric tons of equipment that will go along. The two week delay in offering/accepting/sending this is just astounding.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 09:53:39 PM EST
SRS pump will head to Japan    

The world's largest concrete pump, deployed at the construction site of the U.S. government's $4.86 billion mixed oxide fuel plant at Savannah River Site, is being moved to Japan in a series of emergency measures to help stabilize the Fukushima reactors.

"The bottom line is, the Japanese need this particular unit worse than we do, so we're giving it up," said Jerry Ashmore, whose company, Augusta-based Ashmore Concrete Contractors, Inc., is the concrete supplier for the MOX facility.

The 190,000-pound pump, made by German-based Putzmeister has a 70-meter boom and can be controlled remotely, making it suitable for use in the unpredictable and highly radioactive environment of the doomed nuclear reactors in Japan, he said.

"There are only three of these pumps in the world, of which two are suited for this work, so we have to get it there as soon as we can," Ashmore said in an interview Thursday. "Time is very much a factor."

The pump was moved Wednesday from the construction site in Aiken County to a facility in Hanahan, S.C., for minor modifications, and will be trucked to Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, where it will be picked up by the world's largest cargo plane, the Russian-made Antonov 225, which will fly it to Tokyo.

The move to Atlanta, he added, will require expedited special permits from Georgia's Department of Transportation, because of the weight of the equipment. If all goes well, the pump will be en route to Japan next week.

According to Putzmeister's Web site, four smaller pumps made by the company are already at work at Fukushima pumping water onto the overheated reactors.

Initially, the pump from Savannah River Site, and another 70-meter Putzmeister now at a construction site in California, will be used to pump water -- and later will be used to move concrete.

"Our understanding is, they are preparing to go to next phase and it will require a lot of concrete," Ashmore said, noting that the 70-meter pump can move 210 cubic yards of concrete per hour.

Putzmeister equipment was also used in the 1980s, when massive amounts of concrete were used to entomb the melted core of the reactor at Chernobyl.

In addition to the equipment now at Fukushima and the two 70-meter pumps being moved from the U.S., a contractor in Vietnam has given up a 58-meter pump so it can be diverted to Japan, and two 62-meter pumps in Germany were loaded on Wednesday for transport to Tokyo.

So they are going for the "last resort" Chernobyl solution, apparently.

by das monde on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 01:26:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Hum!? Maybe Jerry Ashmore is misinformed. The Japanese use the concrete pump to pump water into the spent fuel ponds.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 01:39:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Why do they need larger arm then? Just to spray water from further away?

I heard they are going to use dust absorbing powders to clean the air, and then work with concrete. Water contamination will remain a problem though.

by das monde on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 03:24:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Why do they need larger arm then?

Based on the photo of concrete pump truck action at the No. 4 reactor below, the currently used vehicle seems only enough to reach the edge of the buildings, so I guess it will help to better reach the parts of the top floor further away from accessible sides. (I'm not sure though whether the arm can be telescoped out further, but none of the photos I shaw showed it reaching further.)

I heard they are going to use dust absorbing powders to clean the air

No, resins to prevent dust on the ground being picked up by wind.

Fukushima plant groundwater likely contaminated despite data error | Kyodo News

In an effort to prevent radioactive dust from being dispersed by wind and rain from the plant, TEPCO will begin a test spraying of a water-soluble resin, which has coating effects, later in the day.

As a result of hydrogen explosions, masses of debris have been strewn around the site, which was ravaged by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami. A total of 60,000 liters of resin will be sprayed over a period of two weeks.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 03:57:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Would you expect them to solve the problems just by spraying water? Apparently they can't get it inside reactors anyway.
by das monde on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 06:11:36 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Depends on which problem you mean. Spraying water is irrelevant to the reactor cores, they are now pumping freshwater across pipes to cool those. For the cooling of the spent fuel ponds, spraying water does solve the problem, but a permanent way of pumping water across a heat exchanger would be desirable eventually, and of course a cover overhead, but first the wreckage would have to be removed for anything stable. I'm not sure what problem concrete would be supposed to solve – maybe it would block aerial fallout, but that only if cooling efforts are abandoned (both in the spent fuel pools and reactor cores) and all steam is let off first, but then you have complete meltdowns and a bigger problem underneath the reactor.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 06:20:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Do we know that the pools' structure hasn't been damaged so that water leaks out through cracks? Those explosions have been quite spectacular.

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 06:21:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Do we know that the pools' structure hasn't been damaged so that water leaks out through cracks?

No we don't. (We don't know how far the pool was re-filled, either.) However, we calculated that the No. 4 spent fuel pond heats at least at 2°C/h when not boiling and evaporates at 3.7 tons an hour when boiling, that's 88.8 t per day. The amounts pumped into the No. 4 reactor's spent fuel pool (see here) were 125-150 t at a time, the last time 140 t two days after the previous filling. That is in the right ballpark if you take the re-heating of water cooled by the previous addition into account.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 06:34:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Maybe Jerry Ashmore is misinformed. The Japanese use the concrete pump to pump water into the spent fuel ponds.
?

Initially, the pump from Savannah River Site, and another 70-meter Putzmeister now at a construction site in California, will be used to pump water -- and later will be used to move concrete.


As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 10:11:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I remember somewhere in a link that 11 of these trucks were used in the building of the Chernobyl Sarcophagus

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 10:55:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]

The 190,000-pound pump, made by German-based Putzmeister has a 70-meter boom and can be controlled remotely, making it suitable for use in the unpredictable and highly radioactive environment of the doomed nuclear reactors in Japan, he said.

One partial antidote to the gravity of the disaster is levity:

Putzmeister means Plaster Master.

(the company has been in Japan since 1964. it holds the world's record for pumping concrete: 601 m high-rise pumping at Burj Dubai)

some photos of the marvel known as western civilization, before the Lehman and Japanese meltdowns.

We now return you to your unbearable gravity.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

by Crazy Horse on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 07:50:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
to erect a putz like that one.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 09:51:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Reactor operators accelerate anti-tsunami defenses Asahi Shimbun

The Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry called for three steps: deployment of firefighting vehicles and mobile power sources to cool reactors and storage pools holding spent fuel rods; establishment of procedures to respond to an emergency; and implementation of emergency drills based on such procedures.

Earlier, TEPCO submitted to NISA an interim report on revised safety measures for the Fukushima No. 1 plant. Although the utility was instructed to take into account a massive tsunami, which had hit the northeastern region at intervals of 450 years to 800 years, at a gathering of experts in 2009, it failed to finalize the report.

While utilities are actively crafting anti-tsunami steps, their focus is limited to deployment of mobile power sources and adding watertight features to buildings. They are not at present looking at radical redesigns or measures. As a result, local governments hosting nuclear plants appear far from reassured by the ministry's instruction.

"Those safety precautions came too late," said a Niigata prefectural official dealing with nuclear power stations. The official also raised doubts about the ministry's call for the deployment of power-source vehicles, calling it a stopgap measure.

Chubu Electric has been unable to restart the No. 3 reactor at its Hamaoka nuclear plant, which has been idle for checks since November. The operator secured emergency power vehicles before the central government issued the instruction. It also plans to build a breakwater more than 12 meters high and locate emergency generators upland from the plant. The company also held emergency drills Tuesday to prepare for resuming nuclear power generation.



As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 10:12:17 PM EST
French nuke firm Areva vows to support Japan in tackling crisis   Kyodo News

Anne Lauvergeon, chief executive officer of Areva, told Economy, Trade and Industry Minister Banri Kaieda that her company recognizes the Fukushima nuclear emergency as its own, according to a Japanese official. Their meeting was partially open to the media.

The CEO said at a press conference later in the day that Areva plans to soon send about 20 more experts to Japan, in addition to two who are currently assisting the Fukushima plant's operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. in dealing with the contingency. The Areva experts heading to Japan include those specializing in the disposal of radioactive water and spent nuclear fuel, Lauvergeon said. Areva is a manufacturer of uranium-plutonium mixed-oxide fuel, or MOX, which was used at the No. 3 reactor of the Daiichi power station.

Kaieda thanked Lauvergeon for Areva's donation of items such as radiation protective suits and masks and expressed hope that the French firm, which was involved in managing the 1979 Three Mile Island accident and the 1986 Chernobyl crisis, can support Tokyo to resolve ''the unprecedented'' disaster.

Areva has so far sent to Japan 10,000 radiation protective suits, 3,000 masks and 20,000 sets of gloves for nuclear workers, as well as two radiation monitoring vehicles, the Japanese official said.



As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 10:24:15 PM EST
I have been thinking about the low water level in the reactor cores (below the top of the fuel rods), but realised I don't even know if and how any water gets in there. What they flooded with seawater is supposed to be the containment around the pressure vessel (the drywell), isn't it? Does anyone remember details on this?

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 01:43:31 AM EST
In this video presentation a former Fukushima Daiichi No4 engineer explains the data and circumstances that point to a "Loss of Coolant" accident at the No 1 reactors (and perhaps No 2 and 3 as well), which is the worst scenario of meltdown after all the water gone. Around the 52:00 mark he mentions the problem of getting the water into an affected reactor. It seems, there is no solution given leaked pipes.

By the way, here is an an interesting Youtube video about the cleanup of the meltdown Three Miles reactor.

by das monde on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 04:30:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Trying to answer my own question, I again checked the Mathias Braun/Areva presentation. On slide 17, I found something of relevance: it says that the fuel rods won't yet melt if they are half out of water only, they will do so 2/3 exposed (when cladding temperature reaches up to 900°C), and the temperature for zirconium reaction with steam is reached when 3/4 exposed.

The fuel rods are 4 m high, and currently 1.5 to 2.3 m out of water. (The 2.3 m reading is from No. 3, but the second meter in the same core indicates 1.9 m, so I guess one of these meters is damaged and unreliable, too.)

Regarding seawater injection, slide 25 says it was into the pressure vessels, but Mr. Braun is uncertain about the flooding of the surrounding containment (apart from No. 1), and the drawing shows complete fuel rod coverage, so I guess he didn't have enough info himself.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 04:37:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
NHK WORLD English

US, Japan forces start massive search

The US military and Japan's Self-Defense Forces have launched a massive operation to find those still missing in the March 11th earthquake and tsunami.

The joint operation started on Friday, 3 weeks after the disaster. More than 16,000 people remain missing.

In the morning, helicopters of the Ground Self-Defense Force left their base in Sendai City to join the search mission.

Participating in the joint mission are 100 aircraft and 50 vessels from the Self-Defense Forces and about 20 aircraft and more than 10 vessels from the US military.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 03:20:03 AM EST
NHK WORLD English

Over 28,000 dead or missing

The death toll from the March 11th quake and tsunami in northeastern Japan has risen to 11,578.

The National Police Agency said on Friday morning that 16,451 people are listed as missing, bringing the number of dead or missing to over 28,000.

The largest number of deaths --- 7,058 --- has been confirmed in Miyagi Prefecture, followed by Iwate with 3,396 and Fukushima with 1,064.

9,260 of the confirmed dead have been identified and 9,043 bodies have been returned to families.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 03:20:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Intensive search for tsunami victims turns up 18 bodies | Kyodo News

A total of 18 bodies were found by 4 p.m. Friday, the first day of a three-day intensive search the Japanese Self-Defense Forces and the U.S. military are conducting for those still missing three weeks after the devastating earthquake and tsunami in Japan, the Defense Ministry said.

The death toll from the March 11 disaster tallied by the National Police Agency as of 6 p.m. stood at 11,620 in 12 prefectures while the number of missing people reported by their relatives to police totals 16,464 in six prefectures.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 09:00:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
A brighter story (with a video):

Japan earthquake: Town that stood up to the tsunami

by das monde on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 09:06:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Intensive search for tsunami victims turns up 32 bodies | Kyodo News

A total of 32 bodies were found Friday, the first day of a three-day intensive search by Japan and the United States for those still missing three weeks after the devastating earthquake and tsunami in Japan, the Defense Ministry said.

The Japanese Self-Defense Forces and the U.S. military recovered 28 bodies, and the Japan Coast Guard found four in the disaster-hit northeastern part of Japan.

The death toll from the March 11 disaster tallied by the National Police Agency as of 9 p.m. stood at 11,734 in 12 prefectures while the number of missing people reported by their relatives to police totaled 16,375 in six prefectures.

It does appear that most of the missing were indeed washed out to the sea and will never be buried by relatives...

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 03:39:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Dog drifting atop roof rescued off coast of Kesennuma | Kyodo News

A dog was rescued at sea off the coast of Kesennuma on Friday after being found drifting atop a roof believed to have been washed away by the killer tsunami triggered by the March 11 earthquake, Japan Coast Guard officials said.

Coast guard members aboard a helicopter involved in the day's search for those still missing after the disaster found the dog on the roof drifting along some 1.8 kilometers off Kesennuma, Miyagi Prefecture, at around 4 p.m., according to the officials.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 05:15:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Intensive search for tsunami victims runs into 2nd of 3 days | Kyodo News

53 the total number of bodies recovered over two days from areas devastated by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami.

The bulk of Saturday's operation was held in and around Ishinomaki, one of the worst affected cities in Miyagi Prefecture. They searched around an elementary school where many pupils went missing after the tsunami, while some 50 divers from the SDF, the Japan Coast Guard and other entities were deployed to the nearby Kitakami River, the largest in northeastern Japan.

Some 18,000 SDF personnel and about 7,000 U.S. military personnel, as well as members of police, the JCG and fire departments, continued their involvement in the operation.

The death toll from the quake-tsunami disaster tallied by the National Police Agency stood at 11,828 in 12 prefectures as of 4 p.m. Saturday, while the number of missing people reported by their relatives to police totaled 15,540 in six prefectures.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 09:36:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
by das monde on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 04:36:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
In the previous thread, we discussed where TEPCO could put the contaminated water found in the turbine buildings. Here is what they are actually doing, for reactors No. 1 to 3:

TEPCO : Press Release | Status of TEPCO's Facilities and its services after the Tohoku-Taiheiyou-Oki Earthquake (as of 10:00AM)

- At approximately 5:00 pm, March 24th, draining water from underground
  floor of turbine buildings into a condenser was started and it was
  paused at approximately 7:30 am, March 29th because we confirmed that
  the water level reached almost full capacity of a condenser. In order
  to move the water in the condenser into condensate reservoirs, water
  transfer from the condensate reservoirs to suppression pool's water
  surge-tanks has been conducted since around 0:00 pm, March 31st.

...

- At approximately 4:45 pm, March 29th, the water in condensate reservoirs
  was being transferred to suppression pool water surge-tanks to
  prepare for water transfer from a condenser to condensate reservoirs in
  order to drain water on the underground floor of the turbine building
  into a condenser.

...

- At approximately 5:40 pm, March 28th, the water in condensate reservoirs
  was being transferred to suppression pool water surge-tanks to prepare
  for water transfer from a condenser to condensate reservoirs in order to
  drain water on the underground floor of the turbine building into a
  condenser. We finished the transfer work at approximately 8:40 am, March
  31st.

As I understand it:

  • The condenser and condensate reservoirs are part of the plant's primary circuit: steam that passed the turbines are condensed into water with the help of cooling circuits circling seawater, and that is pumped back into the reactor.
  • The suppression pool is the torus under the reactor, which was to serve as part of an emergency short-circuit of the primary circuit: overpressure in the core can be reduced by pumping the steam into this pool to condense.
  • So what they are now doing: they want to pump the water on the floor of the turbine building into a condenser chamber, for that they are pumping the water out of the condenser chamber into the condensate reservoirs (still inside the turbine building), for that they are pumping the water in the reservoirs into tanks connected to the torus underneath the reactor.

In effect, they seem to be trying to contain all contaminated water in pipes and reservoirs meant to contain such water. Then again, there is no control over outflows like that from the spray on the spent fuel pools.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 03:42:54 AM EST
Tokyo Electric warned for not securing enough dosimeters for workers | Kyodo News

The government's nuclear regulatory agency said Friday it had issued another warning to Tokyo Electric Power Co. over the management of workers' radiation exposure at the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, after it was found that there were not enough dosimeters to cover all of the workers.

Some workers were sharing dosimeters while doing the same job because many of the devices were destroyed in the March 11 quake and tsunami, a situation that was not ''desirable from the viewpoint of ensuring workers' safety,'' said Hidehiko Nishiyama, a spokesman for the agency.

But the plant operator, known as TEPCO, had been able to secure a total of 420 dosimeters by Thursday, sufficient for each of the workers to wear a device when working at the radiation-leaking site.

TEPCO officials said the number of dosimeters available had declined from an initial 5,000 to 320 after the tsunami damaged devices. It had been managing the workers' radiation exposure by ordering the leader of each work team to wear a dosimeter, but some workers had expressed concern about the situation.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 06:07:57 AM EST
NHK WORLD English
Tokyo Electric Power Company says it will review all data on radiation leaked from the damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, citing errors in a computer program.

The utility says it found errors in the program used to analyze radioactive elements and their levels, after some experts noted that radiation levels of leaked water inside the plant were too high.

The company and the government's Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency say previously released data may have shown the levels of tellurium-129 and molybdenum-99 to be higher than they really were.

But they say that levels of iodine-131, which has a significant impact on humans and the environment, remain unchanged.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 06:11:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Fukushima plant groundwater likely contaminated despite data error | Kyodo News

Groundwater at the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant is highly likely to be contaminated with radioactive materials, even though its operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. is reviewing its analysis released late Thursday due to erroneous calculations, the government's nuclear safety agency said Friday.

The Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency said some of the analysis data on the groundwater presented by the utility known as TEPCO cannot be trusted due to the errors, casting doubts on the finding that the concentration of radioactive iodine in the water was 10,000 times the legal limit.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 06:09:19 AM EST
NHK WORLD English
Tokyo Electric Power Company says it will review all data on radiation leaked from the damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, citing errors in a computer program.

The utility says it found errors in the program used to analyze radioactive elements and their levels, after some experts noted that radiation levels of leaked water inside the plant were too high.

The company and the government's Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency say previously released data may have shown the levels of tellurium-129 and molybdenum-99 to be higher than they really were.

But they say that levels of iodine-131, which has a significant impact on humans and the environment, remain unchanged.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 06:11:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
For Fukushima's Farmers, Growing Uncertainty : NPR

As Japan continues to grapple with the effects of the March 11 earthquake, the prefecture of Fukushima faces some of the biggest challenges.

Fukushima's roads were damaged in the earthquake, its coast was battered by the tsunami and now leaking radiation around the crippled nuclear complex has made parts of the prefecture unlivable.

The tsunami pushed seawater more than 2 miles inland in some places. Rail lines in Fukushima -- Japan's third-largest prefecture -- were destroyed along the coast; train traffic still hasn't resumed through the prefecture. Radiation from the leaking nuclear complex has forced tens of thousands of residents from their homes. The sale of many vegetables from Fukushima has been banned



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 07:05:02 AM EST
WHY THE JAPANESE GOVERNMENT CAN AFFORD TO REBUILD: IT OWNS THE LARGEST DEPOSITORY BANK IN THE WORLD

Skeptics asked how a country with a national debt that was over 200% of GDP could be "strong and wealthy." In a CIA Factbook list of debt to GDP ratios of 132 countries in 2010, Japan was at the top of the list at 226%, passing up even Zimbabwe, ringing in at 149%. Greece and Iceland were fifth and sixth, at 144% and 124%. Yet Japan's credit rating was still AA, while Greece and Iceland were in the BBB category. How has Japan managed to retain not only its credit rating but its status as the second or third largest economy in the world, while carrying that whopping debt load?

The answer may be that the Japanese government has a captive funding source: it owns the world's largest depository bank. [...] Japan has remained impervious to the speculative attacks that have crippled countries such as Greece and Iceland because it has not fallen into the trap of dependency on foreign financing.

[...] In a 2007 reorganization, the postal savings division was separated from the post office's other arms, turning Japan Post into a proper bank. According to an October 2007 article in The Economist:

The newly created Japan Post Bank will be free to concentrate on banking, and its new status will enable it to diversify into fresh areas of business such as mortgage lending and credit cards. To some degree, this diversification will also be forced upon the new bank. Some of the special treatment afforded to its predecessor will be revoked, obliging Japan Post Bank to invest more adventurously in order to retain depositors-and, ultimately, to attract investors once it lists on the stock market.

That was the plan, and Japan Post has been investing more adventurously; but it hasn't yet given up its government privileges. New Financial Services Minister Shizuka Kamei has put a brake on the privatization process, and the bank's shares have not been sold. Meanwhile, the consolidated Post Bank has grown to enormous size, passing up Citigroup as the world's largest financial institution; and it has been branching into new areas, alarming competitors. A March 2007 article in USA Today warned, "The government-nurtured colossus could leverage its size to crush rivals, foreign and domestic."

Before the March 2011 tsunami, that is what it appeared to be doing. But now there is talk of reverting to the neoliberal model, selling off public assets to find the funds to rebuild. Christian Caryl commented in a March 19 article in Foreign Affairs, published by the Council on Foreign Relations:

As horrible as it is, the devastation of the earthquake presents Japan and its political class with the chance to push through the many reforms that the DPJ [Democratic Party of Japan] has long promised and the country so desperately needs.

In other words, a chance for investors to finally get their hands on Japan's prized publicly-owned bank, and the massive deposit base that has so far protected the economy from the attacks of foreign financial predators.

The Japanese government can afford its enormous debt because the interest it pays is extremely low. For the private economy, public debt IS money. A large public debt owed to the Japanese people means Japanese industries have the money to rebuild. But if Japan Post is sold off to private investors, interest rates are liable to rise, plunging the government into the debt trap it has so far largely escaped.


by das monde on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 07:06:39 AM EST
To reformulate: the japanese can afford to re-build because they have not made the political decision of sponsoring a small class of parasites takes priority over everything else.

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!
by A swedish kind of death on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 12:45:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
bbbut then they're socialistic! how is the invisible hand going to get in its pants work its ineffable magic?

no fair, if we have to bankrupt ourselves so the wealthy can get wealthier, they have to too...

real men know the beauty of d-regulated competition.

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 08:19:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Tremors exceeded design limits for 3 reactors - NHK WORLD English
...The Tokyo Electric Power Company, known as TEPCO, says reactor No.2 suffered the largest horizontal ground acceleration of 550 gals, which is 26 percent stronger than the reactor's design limit.

TEPCO says the readings were 548 gals at the No.5 reactor, about 21 percent higher than its design limit; and 507 gals at the No.3 reactor, topping the capacity by about 15 percent.

The power company says the strength of ground motions were close to or within the design parameters at the remaining 3 reactors, and at all 4 reactors of the nearby Fukushima Daini nuclear plant.

The utility says it was planning to reinforce the reactors so they could withstand horizontal shaking of 600 gals, after the government reviewed their quake-resistance standards 5 years ago. But the work was not finished.


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 08:46:01 AM EST
GE: Fukushima reactors have no structural defects - NHK WORLD English
The chief executive of General Electric has stressed that the GE reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant have no structural problems.

Jeff Immelt spoke to NHK and other media outlets on Thursday. Some observers say the No. 1 and 2 reactors, the oldest types at the plant, have a flaw in their designs.

He said the GE reactor has been in service for more than 40 years and is well-tested and well-designed and has been upgraded over time.

And we should take his word on it because...

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 08:48:19 AM EST
URGENT: Gov't eyes injecting nitrogen into reactor vessels to prevent blasts | Kyodo News
The government and Tokyo Electric Power Co. are considering injecting nitrogen into containment vessels of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant's reactors to prevent hydrogen explosions, government sources said Friday.

Huh!? The hydrogen generated during the initial water depletion should have been mostly vented by now, so does that mean that they still have hydrogen generation?

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 08:58:43 AM EST
Why are they suddenly worried? does this mean that were at the point of reaction occurring again?

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 11:00:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I recall that hydrogen is produced by the thermal decomposition of the zirconium rods. This might indicate that there is concern over the ability to maintain even the existing reduced water levels around the rods in the reactors. If they can prevent hydrogen explosions inside the containment vessel that would be good. Venting a mix of hydrogen and nitrogen should be much less vulnerable to immediate explosion than just venting hydrogen into a norma oxygen/nitrogen atmosphere.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 11:38:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
TEPCO data credibility suffers on serious groundwater contamination | Kyodo News

The operator of a crippled nuclear power plant in Fukushima Prefecture suffered another blow to its credibility on Friday over errors found in its radioactive contamination data, including on groundwater at the plant, while workers began test-spraying a resin there to prevent radioactive particles from being dispersed.

Tokyo Electric Power Co. said the concentration of radioactive iodine in the groundwater was 10,000 times the legal limit as it announced earlier, but acknowledged a programming error on a measuring device that affected substances other than iodine.

Hidehiko Nishiyama, a spokesman for the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, said it was ''extremely regrettable'' that TEPCO -- as the utility is known -- had given incorrect radiation data. The agency has strongly warned the operator over the matter and urged it to take steps not to do so again, he added.

''TEPCO faces a grave situation as it is failing to live up to the expectations of people who are very worried by the company. Its data should be trustworthy,'' Nishiyama said.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 10:57:23 AM EST
TEPCO is playing spin-doctor and the government is sending them sternly worded notes.

huh

They got no idea what they are dealing with.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 01:09:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
NHK WORLD English
Urgent work is continuing on several fronts to contain the crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

Efforts to cool down the reactors continued on Friday. A barge provided by the US Navy is preparing to pump large volumes of fresh water by hose to a water tank near the No.1 reactor.

Workers at the plant are replacing seawater with fresh water to cool the reactors and spent-fuel storage pools. The move follows concerns that salt in the seawater could clog up reactor equipment and hamper the flow of coolant water.

Near the No.4 reactor, 400 liters of a synthetic resin solution were sprayed in an experiment intended to solidify contaminated dust and prevent radioactive materials from getting airborne.

Plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Company is due to test the solution for about 2 weeks to see if it works.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 11:02:16 AM EST

Do not attempt to discuss with me the precise radiological likelihood of there being P239 there (which is slight). I am only posting a very cool photo. (This is not photoshop, this is a photo some aliens from the future took after they picked the Giza containment vessels and dropped them in Japan. Where they said, "Enough is enough with your civilization.")

I am sick and tired of graphs and data. I am sick and tired of arguments and facts. Mother Mary knows we've developed science to such high precision, and my windmills wouldn't have evolved without it.

But enough decision-making without real vision.

My wish for humanity? If you're so into logic and science, get with the program.

(ET moderation: in the interests of credibility, we have excised most of this comment, but because we thought the photo was cool, we let some sentences pass. We at ET are not responsible for the ravings of a madman.)

PS. Dear ET, while i respect your moderation, you should not have edited the comment. Eye mean, you left out the whole part about why the aliens decided to act as saviors of this wretched, forge-based civilization in the first place. Didn't you think the part about the aliens being jealous of YouTube democracy was contrapunctally contrite and to the punt?

But i won't quibble, nor schwank. After all, we've all seen the drone photos of where we are now.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

by Crazy Horse on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 05:44:10 PM EST
great pyramids or smaller ones?

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 05:56:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Do i look like an alien?

How would i know, i didn't even know there were great ones and small ones. the important point is whether the aliens can demonstrate it was the correct solution.

</smiley>

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

by Crazy Horse on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 06:05:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
PS. i'm now beginning to believe this is a photoshop, because the shadows don't match. I do thimk data is important too.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin
by Crazy Horse on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 06:07:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
What do you mean the shadows don't match?

And yes, they are to scale. (See scales at the bottom left of each picture)

The shadows tell you the angle from which the picture was taken.

We should probably be able to triangulate the height of the satellite, too.

Economics is politics by other means

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 05:20:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You can shove like 3 empire state buildings into the volume of great pyramid, not?
by das monde on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 08:36:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
just over two (2.5 vs 1.1)

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 09:40:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
(ET moderation: in the interests of credibility, we have excised most of this comment, but because we thought the photo was cool, we let some sentences pass. We at ET are not responsible for the ravings of a madman.)

PS. Dear ET, while i respect your moderation, you should not have edited the comment. Eye mean, you left out the whole part about why the aliens decided to act as saviors of this wretched, forge-based civilization in the first place. Didn't you think the part about the aliens being jealous of YouTube democracy was contrapunctally contrite and to the punt?

[ET Moderation TechnologyÖ]

I don't know if you realize this is insulting to ET's moderation style.

But since you're a madman, I suppose it's okay.

Economics is politics by other means

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 05:11:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
In morning's light, it does disparage ET Moderation a bit, for which i'm sorry. In my defense, I'd hoped it was obvious these were the ravings of a mad man. (Plus i've developed a writing style where i have dialogue with a reputed editor.)

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin
by Crazy Horse on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 07:08:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Who is this "reputed" editor?

(Not me - Ed)

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 07:16:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
sane horse just doesn't have the same ring to it...

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 08:23:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Do not attempt to discuss with me the precise radiological likelihood of there being P239 there (which is slight).

What do you mean? The likelihood of "there being P239 there" is 100%.

Economics is politics by other means

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 05:35:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I was referring to quantity?

Or not.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

by Crazy Horse on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 07:09:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Lots.

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 05:03:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I am sick and tired of graphs and data. I am sick and tired of arguments and facts. Mother Mary knows we've developed science to such high precision, and my windmills wouldn't have evolved without it.

But enough decision-making without real vision.

What is vision without arguments or facts?

Economics is politics by other means

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 05:36:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The benefits of ALL fact-based arguments ultimately have to be judged intuitively. Logic is a process, not an outcome.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 06:17:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Intuitive arguments benefit from facts, and you don't get to disregard facts because they are inconvenient to the intuitive argument.

Or, rather, you do if you want, but if your intentions is to do whatever you damn well please anyway, then appealing to facts is just one of many possible techniques of persuasion.

Economics is politics by other means

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 06:23:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I love facts, but wasn't referring to the value of science or data. I was commenting on the lost ability of this civilization to use critical judgement, where facts are thrown on the heap of propaganda. Or at least that's what i was trying to do.

or, facts have to be placed in perspective. or something.

the morass of facts about low-level radiation has me in knots. guess i'm frustrated, what with civilization being blind.

or a civilization based upon deep understanding of the physical world, which disconnects them from reality. so they poison it instead of using the gifts already here.

or the Giants lost the season opener, weiss es nicht.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

by Crazy Horse on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 07:15:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The reason it's called Vision, I presume, is because it is akin to the artistic process, where only the medium involves facts - and those facts are generally subsumed into experience and intuition.

Inspirational communication (another word for Art perhaps) is very hard to factualize, and I would contend that the relentless pursuit of logic is responsible for the vast swathes of hypnagogic mass communication that have replaced the inspirational variety.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 09:40:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The intelligence and facts are fixed around the policy.

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 05:03:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That is true if the policy is existential.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 07:02:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Facts are stubborn things.

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 07:15:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Facts by themselves are rather useless: only when supporting an argument do they become useful. And most of the arguments made every day are essentially 'emotional'. Whether or not we accept an argument is often an intuitive estimation of whether or not acceptance will make us feel better.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 09:20:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Facts by themselves are rather useless: only when supporting an argument do they become useful.

They are useful when undermining an argument, too.

Economics is politics by other means

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 09:56:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
hypnagogic mass communication that have replaced the inspirational variety

difference between communication and communion.

the latter does not countenance the Bright Shiny Lie! take that away and words are no longer needed, no words, no lies.

communication is the notes, communion is the music.

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 08:45:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
IAEA chief braces for prolonged nuke crisis in Japan | Kyodo News

International Atomic Energy Agency Director General Yukiya Amano on Friday warned of a prolonged battle to end the ongoing nuclear crisis in quake-hit Japan.

''In order to say everything is normal...I would say it would take more time than people think,'' Amano said at a press conference after meeting with U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki Moon in the Kenyan capital.

The IAEA chief reiterated that the situation at the stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant remains ''very serious.''

At the same press conference, Ban also expressed anxiety about the current crisis, saying, ''We remain deeply concerned about the situation at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station.''



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 07:58:13 PM EST
NHK WORLD English
Japan's government is deciding if highly radioactive water at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant can be temporarily kept in a steel mega float or in US military vessels.

Highly radioactive materials have been detected in water at the crippled nuclear plant in northeast Japan.

Plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Company plans to use water tanks to store the radioactive water, but the capacity of these tanks is limited.

Shizuoka City has offered TEPCO a hollow floating platform made of steel to store the water. The mega float is 136 meters long and 46 meters wide, and is currently used as a deep-sea fishing park.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 08:10:13 PM EST
It may well be that the US Navy only has a few of the water barges like the one shown and others are not in that theater of operations. Does anyone know what the channel depth is for vessels entering and leaving the plant's "harbor"? From Google Earth it appears that there might be a channel into the harbor from deep water but I have no way to judge the depth.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 12:12:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
"steel mega float"? If that's not manga, I dont know what is.

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.
by Starvid on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 09:45:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The Tokyo Hyper rescue squad that the fire department has deployed?

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 01:31:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Tokyo Hyper Rescue Scad outfitted with their Steel Mecha Floats save the day!

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.
by Starvid on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 06:17:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Perhaps the largest single cause of unpredicted failures in complex systems is that multiple components, supposedly independent and redundant, can all fail at the same time for unforeseeable reasons. These can be "commonmode" failures--multiple failures of identical, redundant components in the same manner--or "common-cause" failures--multiple failures, caused by a single initiating event, of components that are different from each other but aresupposed to do the same task. For example, identical valves can fail at the same time if they are all exposed to conditions for which they were not designed, or if they were designed or built wrongly: a common-mode failure

From "Brittle Power", Lovins and Lovins 1984

by rootless2 on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 12:22:44 AM EST
Kan to review energy policy on nuclear reactors

Prime Minister Naoto Kan said Thursday the government will review its basic energy policy that includes increasing the number of nuclear reactors by 14 from the current 54 by 2030.

"Based on the examination results of the current accidents (at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant), we need new discussions about nuclear power and other energy policies," Kan said at a joint news conference with visiting French President Nicolas Sarkozy.

Kan also said that after the nuclear crisis is settled, the government will discuss whether to maintain the current system of depending on private companies, including Tokyo Electric Power Co., the operator of the Fukushima plant, for all of the nation's electricity supply.

"It is necessary to hold discussions about how electric power companies are operated, including the point of whether current private companies should be maintained," Kan said.


Refreshing!

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 12:29:21 AM EST
FSA urges moratorium for quake-hit businesses

Financial regulators have called on lenders to grant a loan moratorium for businesses suffering from the March 11 earthquake, the crisis at the nuclear power plant in Fukushima Prefecture or rolling blackouts.

The Financial Services Agency on Thursday revised guidelines and allowed financial institutions to continue to classify these borrowers as "performing" even if they fall behind in debt repayments. The FSA's revised financial inspection guidelines effectively urged banks and other lenders to postpone loan repayments and not to abruptly call back loans or demand additional collateral from these borrowers.

The financial inspection manual strongly influences how financial institutions categorize borrowers. Financial institutions normally categorize borrowers as "nonperforming" if they default on loan repayments or are at risk of going bankrupt. Nonperforming borrowers are categorized into four groups ranging from "requiring monitoring" to "bankrupt."

A senior FSA official said the agency revised the manual because many businesses have suffered enormous damage from circumstances beyond their control. Still, companies may eventually fail to pay back all the debt if the quake-hit region's economy remains in the doldrums. "Even if the borrowers are given more time, it doesn't necessarily mean they can rebuild their businesses," a senior official of a major bank said.



As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 12:37:51 AM EST
TEPCO speeds up work to remove radioactive water NHK World

The operator of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant is stepping up work to remove radioactive water that hinders the functioning of the cooling systems. Tokyo Electric Power Company is trying to remove contaminated water from the basements of the turbine buildings of the No.1, 2, and 3 reactors.

At all 3 reactors, TEPCO wants to move radioactive water into storage tanks. But first, uncontaminated water in the storage tanks must be transferred. Work at the No. 2 and 3 reactors is expected to begin on Saturday. As for the No. 1 reactor, the uncontaminated water in the storage tank will be completely transferred to another one by Saturday afternoon.

On Friday, workers began a test spraying of synthetic resin in areas around the reactors to contain radioactive materials released by hydrogen blasts. Synthetic resin is expected to harden mud and dust.

The same day, 8 monitoring posts to measure radiation levels in the compounds started functioning again for the first time since the quake struck 3 weeks ago.
TEPCO says it will restore the automatic data transmission system so that the information can be made public on its website.

Also on Friday, docked US military barges began providing freshwater to cool the reactors. But work was suspended temporarily after water leaked from a hose.



As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 12:48:56 AM EST
uncontaminated water in the storage tanks

Bullshit.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 09:25:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It doesn't fit with the recent news. It appears that the first US fresh water barge just arrived, so it they had tanks full of fresh water on site why did they start injecting salt water into the reactor cores in the first place and why did it take so long to switch from salt water?

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 01:48:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Kan looking to split NISA, METI
The Japan Times Online

(Kyodo News) Prime Minister Naoto Kan is looking into the feasibility of separating the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency from the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, according to government sources. METI has long actively promoted nuclear power, which critics say compromises the NISA's role of ensuring safety in the industry. Kan's review of how the government handles nuclear energy comes as Japan is living through its worst-ever nuclear energy crisis at the Fukushima No. 1 power plant.

The agency, established as a special entity of the METI-affiliated Agency for Natural Resources and Energy, is responsible for ensuring the safety of nuclear plants. The Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan, institutionalized under the Cabinet Office, is designed to double-check the agency's steps. In reality, though, the commission merely echoes what the agency decides, according to government officials.

Regional governments hosting nuclear plants have been calling for years for the agency to be independent from the ministry to effectively ensure safety of the facilities. Likewise, Mizuho Fukushima, head of the Social Democratic Party, said in a news conference that she met with Kan and stressed to him her party's long-standing position that the agency must be severed from the ministry.




As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 01:08:54 AM EST
Well, considering the mores of the head of the French nuclear agency (or the attitude of some German regulators), even hat might not be enough.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 09:29:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Reactor Core Was Severely Damaged, U.S. Official Says NYT

WASHINGTON -- Energy Secretary Steven Chu said Friday that roughly 70 percent of the core of one reactor at the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant in Japan had suffered severe damage. His assessment of the damage to Reactor No. 1 was the most specific yet from an American official on how close the plant came to a full meltdown after it was hit by a severe earthquake and massive tsunami on March 11.

Japanese officials have spoken of "partial meltdown" at some of the stricken reactors. But they have been less than specific, especially on the question of how close No. 1 -- the most badly damaged reactor -- came to a full meltdown. Mr. Chu, a Nobel laureate in physics, suggested that the worst moments of the crisis appeared to be receding, saying that the best information the United States had received from the Japanese authorities indicated that water was once again covering the cores of the stricken reactors and that pools of spent fuel atop the reactor buildings were "now under control."

In addition to the severe damage at Reactor No. 1, the Energy Department said that Reactor No. 2 had suffered a 33 percent meltdown. Mr. Chu cautioned that the figures were "more of a calculation" because radiation levels inside the plant had been too high for workers to get inside, and sensors were unreliable.



As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 01:22:00 AM EST
Tainted water confirmed to have seeped into sea from nuke plant | Kyodo News

Water with high levels of radiation has been confirmed to have seeped into the sea from the No. 2 reactor at the troubled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, government officials said Saturday, raising wider fears of environmental contamination by the release of radioactivity.

The water has been leaking into the sea from a 20-centimeter crack detected at a pit in the reactor where power cables are stored, the government's nuclear safety agency said, adding that Tokyo Electric Power Co., known as TEPCO, is ready to encase the fracture in concrete.

The first detection of tainted water flowing out into the Pacific Ocean could force the government and the operator to limit further expansion of radioactive contamination, likely hampering efforts to restore the crippled cooling functions at the complex.

The government ''wants (the utility) to start the operation of covering the crack in concrete as soon as possible,'' said Hidehiko Nishiyama, a spokesman for the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 06:18:24 AM EST
Great.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin
by Crazy Horse on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 07:17:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It would really be great were it to turn out that the major source of leaks into the ocean is from leaky pipes through an accessible crack in a reactor building. My fear remains that some radioactive water is leaking from the dry-well and/or the underlying structure and that it is from cracks under flooded and otherwise inaccessible locations.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 09:24:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
it would be remarkably coincidental if it were to be somewhere we could reach, or an example of brilliant design if all the places where it could crack were accessible.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 11:07:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Reuters - TEPCO poured concrete into the pit to stop the leak, but water prevented it from hardening and the leak had yet to be stopped, public broadcaster NHK said.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 01:48:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 02:33:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You'll have to type in a louder voice I cant hear that one.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 02:35:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Portland cement, major ingredient of concrete, hardens under water.  

So either the Reuters reporter screwed-up or TEPCO is lying.

(Again)


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 02:36:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
well usually my money would be on the reporter, but in this case things are getting just to regular.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 02:43:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The Oil Drum | Fukushima Open Thread - 2nd April
There are cement admixtures that will harden despite being underwater. Normal cement will become too dispersed in an all water environment and won't harden at all. They can't just go to a cement plant and bring a batch of standard cement to fill this crack; they need a low w/c ratio (water/cement) mixture with a fast hardening agent, perhaps with large aggregate sizes so the cement will have something to 'catch' on in the crack.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 03:26:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Part of ordering a load of commercial use concrete is specifying what it is to be used for.  In turn the specification determines the composition of the mix.

And even if the composition is correct merely dumping a butt-load of concrete on a crack isn't sufficient.  There's all kinds of ancillary tasks and structures that have to be in place to ensure a proper pour.

I concede I should have used the word "incompetent" instead of "lying."  

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 03:35:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I was thinking that with their usual perceived level of planning and performance, we will no doubt find in a couple of days that they just sent a guy to a builders merchants in Tokyo for a couple of bags of gravel and cement mix to throw into the pool.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 03:46:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
NHK -  more than 6 hours later, the amount of water flowing into the pit was so large that the injected concrete had not solidified yet, allowing radioactive water to leak into the ocean. The power company will try other measures on Sunday morning to stop water from entering the pit. It will use a particular kind of polymer which will absorb the water.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 06:16:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I believe the crack was reported as being 8cm wide. Some kind of hardware cloth should have been put in the bottom of the crack, if it is a bottom and not now just a gaping chasm. With all of the pumping of water to and fro between tanks, one would think they could find someplace to pump the water draining into this pit. This is pitiful.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 07:38:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think the 8cm was the relic of my top of the head translation of 20cm into inches, minus the inches dimension. :-) More pitiful.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 07:40:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
we keep having things fail,  and then they say, "We'll try something else tomorrow" does noone say "Is there a good reason why you dont take the plastic out now? and if not, why are you planning on sitting on your ass for the next eight hours"?

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 08:01:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
So they didn't put a supporting frame - one of those "ancillary tasks" I mentioned above - around the area of the pour and the pressure of the water caused a blow-out.

Now they have radioactive water all over the place and a bunch of radioactive concrete in the way of getting to the crack where the water is pouring out and generally cluttering the area.

This is madness.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 01:28:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
WHat if the water is producing 1Sv/h of radiation?

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 05:29:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Caveat:  I am not a Materials Engineer.

From here:

Concrete is a mixture of a binding agent (generally cement) to bond the other materials together :, fine aggregate (sand), coarse aggregate ( gravel/stones ), and water..  A typical composition is about 7-15% cement, 14-21% water and the rest aggregate.

Water Resistant Concrete    

    * Water Resistant concrete can either be water proofed or watertight. Waterproofed concrete is formed with a water resistant layer or surface whilst the mass of concrete being ordinary concrete. The water tight layer can be formed using a spray of lacquer, or applying a coat of asphalt or bitumen or using a wash of soda (water glass)
    * A watertight concrete can be produced by ensuring and dense product using tight quality control of the production process. The concrete so formed can be sufficiently water-tight to enable use for tanks retaining water

High density Concrete    

High density concrete for use as nuclear shield walls and ballast blocks and sea walls can be produced by using different materials for the aggregate.  Candidate materials include barytes, haematite, iron shot, steel shot and lead shot.

I can't find any information stating the concrete composition and construction of the buildings housing the reactors.  It is uncertain if the floor of the building was constructed with high density concrete or with low density concrete with a surface application to make it water tight.    

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 01:03:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
When they say 20cm crack I wonder in what direction they're measuring the crack. 20cm in length underwater sounds hard to notice in a trench full of radioactive water and rubble, whereas 20 cm across hardly sounds like something which would seep

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 03:01:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
looking at the updated version of this story theres this quote at the end

TEPCO is considering using a large artificial floating island, a so-called ''megafloat,'' to store the tainted water, the agency said.

The utility expects the artificial floating island, which will be provided by the city of Shizuoka, can store about 10,000 tons of water, company officials said, while the amount of water detected in the plant has reached around 13,000 tons.

is the other 3000 tons going to fit in the pipes and tanks onsite?

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 06:56:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
They need to bite the bullet and acquire some river barges outfitted for liquid transport. China may be the closest available supply, as they do lots of bulk transport by river. While they are at it they need to line up two old tankers into which the barges can offload contaminated water. They are failing to come up with storage that is adequate to what contaminated water currently exists but continuing to have to add freshwater that immediately becomes contaminated water if it doesn't evaporate. They need to get out in front of this. Again the response seems like that of the typical crowd in a bad horror movie -- frozen by fear.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 07:46:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
the whole event has just stunk of that US saying A day late and a dollar short.

If you look at the cardinal virtues, one of them is Temperance, now this isn't the religious not drinking meaning, theres another meaning, doing things in the right proportion at the right time. and that is one that appears to be a consistent point of failure.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 08:31:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It appears that looking desperate, hurried is frown upon in the Japanese culture. When shit hits a fan, you are supposed to rather swallow it whole than show sweat cleaning, to keep your status.

In his "Outliers", Gladwell describes a cultural reform at "Korean Air", that used to have a frightening safety record. What was changed is flight crews' tendency to show too much reverence to its senior officers, and communicate to them tentatively, indirectly, ambiguously.

by das monde on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 09:37:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That makes total sense. In trying to save face they are in the process of loosing their asses,  much of Honshu and, quite possibly, Tokyo. Would it be culturally acceptable for PM Kan to decapitate the management of TEPCO, declare them to have been an obstacle to handling the problem and then to proceed with alacrity? Surely this current inappropriate response is not how the Japanese reacted to bad news during WWII and earlier, is it?

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 12:01:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Would it be culturally acceptable for PM Kan to decapitate the management of TEPCO, declare them to have been an obstacle to handling the problem and then to proceed with alacrity?

I suspect this may have happened already.

However, suppose you're PM Kan and have removed the TEPCO management. Who do you put in charge of the operations since you yourself don't have the expertise? I would hope the higher-ranking technical people at TEPCO are already in charge of the operations.

Economics is politics by other means

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 05:36:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I suspect this may have happened already.

The Government may have effectively taken control, but what ever they have done does not seem to enable them to move with any alacrity. That is what they need. Perhaps "foreign pressure" will enable them to get ahead of the situation instead of engaging in a series of tentative half measures. Now is a time to err on the side of an overly robust response.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 01:30:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Do they have the expertise?

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 01:45:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
From what I can gather:  no.


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 02:23:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Do they realise this, and who does?

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 02:24:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't know the answer to either question.

I don't know if there IS anybody living on this planet who has the expertise to come in and do a better job.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 02:30:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That's my problem with a lot of the second-guessing going on.

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 02:39:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Because people who can't manufacture it cannot fix it when it breaks.

Whether people who can manufacture it can fix it when it breaks remains an open question.

Economics is politics by other means

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 02:30:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh c'mon.  It's not ALL bad.

The disaster released multitudes of radiation resistant bacteria into the environment.

So if worse comes to worse cockroaches will have something to eat.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 02:42:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Do they have the expertise?

They understand that they need to deal with contaminated water. If nothing else, there are large rubberized floating containers that could be used to shuttle contaminated water from the harbor, which a US destroyer can obviously enter, out to where a tanker could be anchored. This would provide interim storage in the range of 100,000 tons or more. With two such tankers available and some shore based storage facilities in which to offload the tankers, an operational capability adequate to at least the next month could be created. This is not nuclear engineering so much as logistics.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 03:34:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The Government may have effectively taken control

Some symbolic clarity would be welcome already. At least, the government could form a commission of non-TEPCO experts (local or international) that could have full access to developments, make their own assessments, have say in measure implementation, and would represent public concern.

So far it looks like TEPCO is enjoying fully the privilege of "managing" the situation, controlling the information and own responsibility scope, keeping others dependent. Corporate emperors...

by das monde on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 08:52:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
the trouble with temperance is you have to go too far first to know what it is. eg:
the road of excess leads to the palace of wisdom. (william blake)

world is full of folk going too far right now, in every direction...

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 08:32:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Now would be a good time for some excess in the application of remedial measures at Fukushima.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 01:33:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
NHK is reporting that the US specialists have told the Japanese SDF that radioactive Caesium attaches to the paint used on military helicopters and trucks especially easily. military vehicles and crew need their radiation levels monitoring especially thoroughly


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 09:10:22 AM EST
helicopters used to spray and monitor  reactors have readings of several hundred microsieverts around engine intakes, mechanics are having to work in radiation suits, and special  machines used to hoover round those points before people can work on those machines.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 09:24:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Spraying 1/8" screens with that paint and stacking them several high at intervals might make an effective cesium absorber.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 02:17:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Zero Hedge  Chris Martenson Exclusive: New Photos Of Fukushima Reactors

Exclusive: new photos of Fukushima reactors

Noting that the press has largely turned its resources off of the Fukushima complex, and needing up-to-date information on the status of the damage control efforts there, we secured the most up-to-date satellite photo from DigitalGlobe (dated March 31st), which we analyze below. This is the first photo of the damaged reactor site at Japan's Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear facility made available to the public in over a week. That means you, our readers, are the first public eyes anywhere to see this photo.

Drawing upon the expertise of our resident nuclear engineer and Ann Stringer, imaging expert, we conclude that the situation at Fukushima is not stabilized: things are not yet at a place of steady progress in the containment and clean-up efforts. It's still a dance, forwards and backwards, with the workers making gains here and there and the situation forcing them to react defensively.  




Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 10:46:33 AM EST
The interesting part is the cars and trucks. They are however confused about the concrete pump truck and the barge timeline, and didn't get that the I-134 claim was withdrawn along with the "10 million times normal" claim.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 11:15:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, one of many. Here is another:


As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 02:13:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Martensen The image to which Martensen referrs
:

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 02:08:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Japan PM tells Fukushima nuclear plant workers to hold firm | World news | The Observer

Japan's prime minister, Naoto Kan, will tell workers at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant to hold firm in the belief that disaster can be averted, as highly radioactive water continued to seep into the sea.

Nuclear officials' discovery of a crack in a concrete pit at the number two core could offer an explanation for the flow of contaminated water that has jeopardised the operation to calm the reactors and raised fears about radiation finding its way into the sea and soil near the facility.

Tokyo Electric Power (Tepco) said it would pour concrete into the pit, where radiation measuring 1,000 millisieverts per hour has been recorded, in an attempt to seal the eight-inch long crack.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 11:07:28 AM EST
and no indication as to when and judging from the film it must be recent but I don't remember seeing this before



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 12:18:47 PM EST
They don't have enough dosimeters for all the workers!?

WTFWTF!

Economics is politics by other means

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 05:13:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yep, reports are that they originally had 5000 dosimeters but the Tsunami and earthquake managed to destroy all but 200, Why they have failed to bring in any from the other plant which is a mere 7 km away, or failed to ring up another plant operator and asked to borrow a few till they can buy some more is an exercise left entirely to the reader.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 06:48:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I suspect only an untrained worker would accept to work without a dosimeter.

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 07:16:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Fukushima: TEPCO Hires Homeless People
We'll just say that obviously we have no idea whether this is true or not. But even if it is true, we're not sure that it's really that horrible...


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 07:23:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]
They could use dogs, possibly.
by das monde on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 04:38:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Japan Earthquake: nuclear plants - Page 157
The problems Tepco have in moving the basement and trench water are clearly indicated in below slide:


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 12:44:36 PM EST
Japan Earthquake: nuclear plants - Page 157
TEPCO published some pics today to celebrate US barge docking with freshwater. It was also reported that one man fell into the water during the docking procedure.
(I now read Japan are asking USA to use this barge to store radioactive water after freshwater has been used)

But look at the last photo - massive ground shifting took place during earthquake - remember this is fill on bedrock.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 12:45:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Disaster legislation 'to nationalize land' : National : DAILY YOMIURI ONLINE (The Daily Yomiuri)

A key part of a special legislative package for disaster reconstruction will place land that was wrecked by the March 11 tsunami and has been abandoned by disaster victims under state ownership, it has been learned.

The government and Democratic Party of Japan are working on a set of bills to help with the rebuilding of regions struck by the disaster and hope to pass the package by the end of the month, government sources said Thursday.

Many tsunami-devastated coastal communities have been largely depopulated and are unlikely to be revived because of the severity of the disaster, the sources said. In addition to the areas laid waste by the tsunami, the ongoing crisis at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant could leave large tracts of land abandoned for a long period of time.

To address the scale of the tragedy, the special legislation will increase the burden the central government must pay to move disaster victims into evacuation shelters. Under the existing disaster relief law, the central government is required to fund three-fourths of the cost, according to the sources. The bigger ratio will ease the burden on local governments, which must pay for a quarter of the costs under the current system.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 01:09:37 PM EST
Distrust grows among N-crisis players : National : DAILY YOMIURI ONLINE (The Daily Yomiuri)

Prime Minister Naoto Kan's visit to the crippled Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant a day after the March 11 earthquake is being criticized for allegedly delaying efforts to control the nuclear crisis.

The prime minister had expressed a strong wish to see the accident site, and a Ground Self-Defense Force helicopter carrying Kan left the Prime Minister's Office in Tokyo's Nagatacho district early on the morning of March 12.

Kan's visit to the plant lasted for 50 minutes.

At that time, pressure inside the containment vessel at the No. 1 reactor was very high. Three hours before Kan's departure, Economy, Trade and Industry Minister Banri Kaieda instructed plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. to open a valve and release high-pressure steam into the air.

However, the utility did not implement this measure until one hour after the prime minister finished his visit.

Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said the prime minister's visit had nothing to do with the delay. According to a ranking official of the opposition Liberal Democratic Party, however, many believe TEPCO intentionally waited so that Kan would not be at risk from the radioactive materials that would be released from the containment vessel with the steam.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 01:15:43 PM EST
N-reactor builders fret about loss of business : National : DAILY YOMIURI ONLINE (The Daily Yomiuri)

U.S. and European nuclear reactor builders increasingly are concerned about the situation at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant because a prolonged crisis could force countries worldwide to change their policies on nuclear power and eventually deal a heavy blow to their business.

Apparently stemming from this concern, visiting French President Nicolas Sarkozy and Areva SA, a French major nuclear reactor maker, on Thursday announced support for Japan's response to the series of accidents at the nuclear power plant following the massive quake and tsunami.

During talks with Economy, Trade and Industry Minister Banri Kaieda in Tokyo, Anne Lauvergeon, chief executive officer of Areva, said she recognized that the problems at the Tokyo Electric Power Co. nuclear plant are not only Japan's but her company's as well. She said Areva would provide maximum support to Japan.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 01:17:16 PM EST
Nuke crisis in Fukushima forces utilities to delay restart of reactors | Kyodo News

The ongoing nuclear crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, crippled by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, has forced other Japanese utility firms to put off resuming operations at their nuclear power plants and invest more in safety measures.

Chubu Electric Power Co. has postponed its original plan for early April to resume operations at the No. 3 reactor at its Hamaoka nuclear plant in Omaezaki, Shizuoka Prefecture, where a major earthquake has been feared to hit.

The power company has also decided to wait until fiscal 2016 to build its sixth reactor at the plant from 2015, and until after 2013 to use plutonium-uranium mixed oxide, or MOX, fuel at the No. 4 reactor.

MOX fuel was used at the No. 3 reactor of the overheating, radiation-leaking Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station where cooling functions were lost after the quake.

Power companies are planning to take measures against tsunami as instructed in late March by the Japanese government after the disaster, and hoping to get their nuclear reactors, suspended mainly for regular checkups, up and running.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 01:18:35 PM EST
Graphs of temperatures, pressures, water levels, flow rates and radiation readings produced by the Institute of Computing, UNICAMP

http://www.ic.unicamp.br/~stolfi/EXPORT/projects/fukushima/plots/2011-04-01-200000/plot-un1-full.png

http://www.ic.unicamp.br/~stolfi/EXPORT/projects/fukushima/plots/2011-04-01-200000/plot-un2-full.png

http://www.ic.unicamp.br/~stolfi/EXPORT/projects/fukushima/plots/2011-04-01-200000/plot-un3-full.png

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 02:34:39 PM EST
NHK WORLD English
Radioactive iodine twice the country's legal standard has been detected in seawater at a location 40 kilometers south of the disabled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

The Japanese Science Ministry on Saturday released the results of a survey based on samples taken 3 days ago. The sample was collected at a spot 10 kilometers off Iwaki City and 40 kilometers from the disabled plant, both in Fukushima Prefecture.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 03:14:55 PM EST
Tepco dumps concrete to plug radiation leak at No. 2 | The Japan Times Online
Tokyo Electric Power Co. said Saturday that a cracked storage pit at the Fukushima No. 1 power plant was the source of a radioactive water leak contaminating the ocean and that it is attempting to fill it with concrete.

According to the utility and the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, the square, concrete-covered pit is situated near an intake used to pump seawater into reactor No. 2.

Although the pit is small, it contains highly contaminated water with a radioactivity exceeding 1,000 millisieverts per hour that is leaking into the ocean from a 20-cm crack, Tepco said.

The pit, which is 1.2 meters x 1.9 meters and 2 meters deep, is usually used to store cables. But it is also connected directly to the reactor building through a cable trench, raising the possibility that the source of the contaminated water is the reactor itself, a NISA official said.

The cable trench is different from the pipe trench at No. 2, where water with the same level of radioactivity was discovered Monday. Although the two trenches are connected, no water has been found in the cable trench because it is at a higher elevation, the official said.

How much water has leaked and for how long were not known as of Saturday afternoon.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 04:05:46 PM EST
Workers shift to Plan C in bid corral radiation from stricken plant

Workers at the stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant are onto Plan C in their bid to stop highly radioactive water from gushing directly into the Pacific Ocean through a cracked concrete shaft, a Japanese nuclear official said Monday.

Neither of the first two attempts to fill up the 20-centimeter (8-inch) crack outside the No. 2 reactor's turbine building -- on Saturday by pouring in concrete, and then Sunday by using a chemical compound mixed with sawdust and newspaper -- has been successful [...]

As they mull other ways to cut off the leak at its source, workers will install a silt fence along a damaged sea wall surrounding the plant, Hidehiko Nishiyama of Japan's nuclear and industrial safety agency said Monday. The aim of this screening, which is usually used to halt erosion at construction sites, is to prohibit the spread of radioactive particles into the sea.

Workers also have injected a dye tracer into the water to allow them to track the dispersal of such particles [...]

In some cases, authorities don't even know how much radiation is getting out.

After some high-profile errors while offering regular radiation measurements on seawater, groundwater and the air, little such new information has been released since Thursday. One reason is that the dosimeters being used don't go above 1,000 millisieverts per hour, Junichi Matsumoto, an executive with the plant's owner Tokyo Electric Power Company, told reporters Sunday [...]

The amount of emitted radiation, be it into the water or air, is also unknown. Authorities do believe there had been at least a partial meltdown of nuclear fuel -- thanks to intense heat, at one point, topping 2,700 Celsius (4,800 Fahrenheit) in the No. 1 reactor and 1,800 Celsius (3,200 Fahrenheit) in the Nos. 2 and 3 reactors, according to an analysis from Areva, one of the world's top nuclear energy companies based in France.

by das monde on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 04:28:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Tepco to Dump Radioactive Water in Sea to Keep Reactors Stable

Tokyo Electric Power Co. will dump radioactive water from its crippled Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear station into the sea for the first time as it runs out of space to store fluids used to cool the plant's six reactors.

The government approved a plan by the utility known as Tepco to release water with low radioactive contamination into the sea to make room for liquids with higher radiation levels, Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said.

"We didn't have any other alternatives," Edano told reporters in Tokyo today. "This is a measure we had to take to secure safety."

Tepco said it plans to discharge as early as tonight 11,500 tons of water containing radioactive iodine levels about 100 times the regulatory limit [...]

The latest deaths bring to seven the number of workers killed at the utility's two nuclear power complexes in Fukushima, including five employees of sub-contractors whose deaths were confirmed on March 12 and 14.

It may take several months to stop the emission of radioactive material, Goshi Hosono, a lawmaker in the Democratic Party of Japan in the ruling coalition, told reporters. Hosono is an envoy between the government and Tepco [...]

A Tepco executive said yesterday he isn't optimistic about the prospect of containing damage at the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant's No. 3 reactor.

"I don't know if we can ever enter the No. 3 reactor building again," Hikaru Kuroda, the company's chief of nuclear facility management, said at a press conference [...]

Wind at the Fukushima plant will blow from the northwest this evening at a speed of two meters to six meters a second, and will blow from the west tomorrow, Japan Meteorological Agency said in a forecast [...]

by das monde on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 07:19:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
In japanese



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 07:21:41 PM EST


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 07:33:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
about 12 minutes into the second film you get staff playing football/kendo/judo/in the gym. knowing what we do now it loooks very much like those army recruiting adverts, where youre going skiing/scuba diving/ visiting exotic locations, and they manage to casually leave out the natives shooting at you.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 07:41:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
NHK -  Radioactive levels measured within 20km of plant

The Japanese government and the operator of the stricken Fukushima Daiichi power plant have started to gauge radioactive levels in the air within a 20 kilometer radius of the plant.

The government and Tokyo Electric Power Company have already been measuring radioactivity in the air outside the 20-kilometer exclusion zone that residents have been instructed to leave.

But they have not conducted any detailed assessments within the zone, saying that most residents have already evacuated the area and that there would be an increased risk of workers conducting the tests being exposed to radiation.

At a meeting of Japanese and US nuclear experts, the US side claimed more research is needed to determine the extent at which radioactive substances are spreading  




Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 08:56:39 PM EST
Embattled TEPCO now facing a harsh public backlash   Asahi Shimbun

Some members of the public are expressing their frustrations with Tokyo Electric Power Co. and its employees for the concerns arising from the crippled Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant and rolling blackouts. Because the initial complaints have escalated to threats and harassment, TEPCO has taken measures to protect the safety of its employees.

....

The company has a number of dorms for single employees and families in the Tokyo area. Those dorms have taken to applying masking tape over the company name or replacing the sign with one that does not include the company name. An official at the Tokyo branch said, "It is being done to protect our employees and their families."

....

According to TEPCO sources, complaints and protests about the nuclear accident and rolling blackouts have flooded the call center the Tokyo branch has set up for phone consultations. Because the number of calls exceeds the capacity to respond, some people have come directly to the call center to complain to employees about failing to take their call. Since March 23, when levels of iodine exceeding safety standards were found in a reservoir for drinking water in Tokyo, protests have been made about concerns about radioactive materials and how TEPCO was planning to assume responsibility.

....

Toshiaki Kamei, a professor emeritus at Kansai University who heads the Japan Risk Management Society, said TEPCO bore much of the blame. "The bad response by TEPCO only intensified the concerns among the public," Kamei said. "The public did not initially know what was occurring in the nuclear plant and that led to doubts that, 'They are likely hiding something.' There is a need to release information as it is obtained and explain what is going on."

   

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 10:22:06 PM EST
Lack of packaging keeps shelves empty  Daily Yomiuri

Weeks after the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, shelves in many stores remain empty of food and various everyday items. It is often not the products themselves that are in shortage, however, but containers and packaging. Containers for natto, a traditional Japanese dish of fermented soybeans, and cartons for milk are scarce, and a lack of ink has hampered production of some magazines.

....

The milk supply chain has been disrupted by a shortage of cardboard cartons. Nippon Paper-Pak Co., a major beverage packaging firm, had to suspend operations at its two plants in Ibaraki Prefecture due to the disaster, and its storage warehouse was damaged. Although it had resumed normal operations as of Tuesday, the company said it would take time for its output to catch up to milk firms' demand.

With water contamination scares pushing up demand for bottled mineral water, the beverage industry is facing a shortage of caps for plastic bottles. Bottle cap production at Japan Crown Cork Co.'s plant in Ishioka, Ibaraki Prefecture, and Nihon Yamamura Glass Co.'s factory in Utsunomiya have been halted. Production by the nation's three leading cap makers has slowed to 60 percent of pre-earthquake levels. Output at factories in western Japan has been increased, but this has not been enough to meet the gap. "We haven't been able to get the amount [of caps] we want. This is now having a negative impact on our efforts to boost production," an official of a major beverage maker said.

....

Publisher Shueisha Inc. has been hit by shipping disruptions as well as shortages of paper and ink. It postponed the March 28 release of comic magazine "Weekly Shonen Jump" by one week, and pushed back the release of "Kochikame Volume 174" and other comic book titles from Monday until April 21.

Procuring ink, in particular, has become difficult. Earthquake damage to equipment at Maruzen Petrochemical Co.'s plant in Ichihara, Chiba Prefecture, has stopped production of Diisobutylene, a chemical product used to make ink. The Chiba factory was responsible for 100 percent of the domestic supply of Diisobutylene, so its troubles have had a huge impact on the publishing industry.

Lots of nails gone missing.  

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 10:36:05 PM EST
From Far Labs, a Vivid Picture Emerges of Japan Crisis  NYT/IHT

For the clearest picture of what is happening at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, talk to scientists thousands of miles away. Thanks to the unfamiliar but sophisticated art of atomic forensics, experts around the world have been able to document the situation vividly. Over decades, they have become very good at illuminating the hidden workings of nuclear power plants from afar, turning scraps of information into detailed analyses.

....

Most of these computer-based forensics systems were developed after the 1979 partial meltdown at Three Mile Island, when regulators found they were essentially blind to what was happening in the reactor. Since then, to satisfy regulators, companies that run nuclear power plants use snippets of information coming out of a plant to develop simulations of what is happening inside and to perform a variety of risk evaluations.

Indeed, the detailed assessments of the Japanese reactors that Energy Secretary Steven Chu gave on Friday -- when he told reporters that about 70 percent of the core of one reactor had been damaged, and that another reactor had undergone a 33 percent meltdown -- came from forensic modeling.

The bits of information that drive these analyses range from the simple to the complex. They can include everything from the length of time a reactor core lacked cooling water to the subtleties of the gases and radioactive particles being emitted from the plant. Engineers feed the data points into computer simulations that churn out detailed portraits of the imperceptible, including many specifics on the melting of the hot fuel cores.




As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 10:48:39 PM EST
Tellurium 129 Presence Is Proof Of Inadvertent Recriticality At Fukushima

For those wondering just why TEPCO and Japan in general have been in such as scramble to cover up as much of the reactor in a concrete sarcophagus, after up until now the utility had been perfectly happy to come up with one after another useless idea of delaying the inevitable moment of sarcophagation, here is Arnie Gunderson from Fairewinds and Associates explaining that now there is definitive proof, courtesy of Tellurium 129 and a order of magnitude higher concentration of Iodine 131 in Reactor 1, that the reactor is now undergoing sporadic events of recriticality: in other words, the fission reaction is recommencing on its own, and without any supervision, emitting undetectable neutron beams which are irradiating any and all personnel still on location. For the time being these recritical events are isolated, although courtesy of the whole premise behind a nuclear power plant, all it takes is for some form of critical threshold to be reached, and for a full blown self-sustaining chain reaction to result in Chernobyl part 2. If nothing else, we now know why the authorities are desperate to bury everything literally under the sand. Because at least a few thousands tons of concrete will provide a modest buffer for unprecedented amount of radiation before these hit the surrounding environment. Lastly, all those hoping that natural rod cooling is sufficient, and if the plant is left along long enough on its own, things will get better, are now proven wrong.
by das monde on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 03:28:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
by das monde on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 07:31:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Radiation below legal limits found in farm, sea products near Fukushima   TOKYO, April 3, Kyodo

The health ministry said Saturday that lower levels of radiation materials than the legal limits were detected in farm products and seafood in and around Fukushima Prefecture where the crippled nuclear power plant is located.

In Fukushima, 33 out of 49 vegetables and fruits had radioactive cesium and iodine but their levels were below the limits set under the food sanitation law, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare said. "There is a possibility of proliferation of radioactive substances abating," a ministry official said.



As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 11:51:12 PM EST
While I realize that the natures of the Japanese and Korean people are very different the Koreans were able to respond effectively to a situation that was threatening planeloads of people at a time. The Japanese seem unable to respond to a situation that is threatening entire provinces at a time.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 12:04:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I think the difference may be down to planeloads of people vs. entire provinces.

I personally don't have enough information to say what needs to be done or whether it's feasible. One important feature of this crisis is that the emergency workers keep being surprised by developments, so the question is why they don't know what to expect.

Economics is politics by other means

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 05:22:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Absorbent to soak up radioactive water, 2 found dead at nuke plant | Kyodo News

Workers prepared Sunday to block the leakage of highly radioactive water into the sea from the crisis-hit Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant by injecting polymeric powder that can absorb 50 times its volume of water, the government's nuclear safety agency said.

Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano, meanwhile, told a press conference that it could take several months before radiation stops leaking from the plant.

The plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. said the same day that two workers in their 20s who had been missing since the devastating March 11 quake and tsunami that crippled the power station were found dead in the basement of a reactor turbine building last Wednesday.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 04:51:50 AM EST
2 missing TEPCO workers found dead at troubled nuclear plant | Kyodo News

Two employees of Tokyo Electric Power Co. who had been missing since the March 11 quake and tsunami have been found dead at the crisis-hit Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, the utility said Sunday, adding that they died of bleeding from multiple wounds.

The two, who had been inspecting the No. 4 reactor's turbine building, are believed to have died around 4 p.m. on March 11, after a massive tsunami triggered by the 2:46 p.m. quake struck the site.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 08:00:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Gov't says several months may be required before radiation leaks stop | Kyodo News

The government expects that several months may be required before radioactive particles stop being released from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, its top spokesman said Sunday.

''If we apply methods considered to be normal, I believe that it will be something like that,'' Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano told a news conference, when asked whether at least several months would be required before the plant crippled by the devastating March 11 earthquake and ensuing tsunami is brought under control.

''While it may not be feasible, we have been asking for other possibilities to be explored to shorten that period,'' Edano said, noting that the government and the plant's operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. are considering multiple approaches to halting the nuclear crisis.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 04:52:28 AM EST
They could start by requiring that any measure designed to deal with an immediate problem be capable of dealing with that problem twice over. Then they might start to get ahead of the problem.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 07:35:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Fukushima gov. rebukes nuclear agency for late radioactivity data | Kyodo News

Fukushima Gov. Yuhei Sato expressed anger at the central government's nuclear safety agency on Sunday for its late release of radioactivity data related to local farm produce, shipments of which have been partly restricted amid the ongoing nuclear crisis.

The prefectural government also faced moves overseas to curb business with local manufacturers of industrial goods over worries about radiation, and will deal with them by measuring residual radiation from the products from Monday at its research institute, officials said.

The central government is considering lifting its restriction on shipments of vegetables tainted with radioactive substances after confirming levels below designated limits for consumption in three tests, but it takes a few days for the results of each test to be released, according to Sato.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 04:53:14 AM EST
Fukushima gov. rebukes nuclear agency for late radioactivity data | Kyodo News
  • NEWS ADVISORY: Radioactive water still leaking after injection of polymeric powder (17:46)
  • NEWS ADVISORY: TEPCO injects polymeric powder into pit to absorb radioactive water (17:35)


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 04:53:39 AM EST
NHK WORLD English
More than 12,000 people have been confirmed dead so far in the March 11th massive earthquake and subsequent tsunami that hit northeastern Japan.

The highest number of deaths was reported in Miyagi Prefecture -- 7,318 -- followed by 3,518 in neighboring Iwate Prefecture. Other deaths were reported in a wide area of eastern Japan, including 7 in Tokyo.

<snip>

The authorities say the number of dead could increase further, as some local municipalities have been unable to assess the number of missing people because they were devastated by tsunami.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 04:56:05 AM EST
that 20 cm crack via Physics forums



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 07:20:41 AM EST
NHK WORLD English
Japan's Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency says there has been no change in the amount of radioactive water seeping from the Fukushima nuclear plant after a polymer absorbent was injected into a cracked pit.

Tokyo Electric Power Company found on Saturday that contaminated water was leaking into the ocean from the 20-centimeter crack in the concrete pit.

On Sunday, the utility firm used a polymer absorbent to try to stop the leak of radioactive water.

The government's nuclear agency said the injection of the chemical began shortly after 1:40 PM, but it cannot confirm if there has been a decline in the amount of contaminated water leaking into the ocean.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 04:37:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"Seeping"?!

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.
by Starvid on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 06:19:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Which was why I went looking, :)

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 06:27:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
NHK WORLD English
Tokyo Electric Power Company has tried to stop the leakage of radioactive water from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant into the sea by obstructing the route of contaminated water. But no improvement was reported on Sunday. The company is going to make another attempt to block the stream on Monday.

Highly radioactive water was found leaking directly into the sea from a crack in a concrete pit on Saturday.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 08:12:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
is quite good.

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 12:01:10 PM EST
Time: We want to show that the government is looking to the future. (April 1, 2011)
YUKIO EDANO, Japan's Chief Cabinet Secretary, explaining why he showed up for a press conference Friday, April 1, in normal business attire rather than the blue emergency jumpsuit he has worn at the podium since disasters struck the country on March 11
With a picture of him in the blue emergency jumpsuit.

Please tell me that's an April Fools'.

Economics is politics by other means

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 02:50:53 PM EST
The current Kan government was considered a weak government prior to the quake and tsunami. It is also the first government by other than the LDP since -- WWII?

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 03:42:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think it may be the second DPJ cabinet since they unseated the LDP.

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 04:10:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Illegal levels of radioactive substances found in Fukushima mushrooms | Kyodo News

The health ministry said Sunday it has detected radioactive substances higher than the legal limits in mushrooms sampled Friday in Iwaki, Fukushima Prefecture, where the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant is located.

The Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare said it found the mushrooms to contain 3,100 becquerels of radioactive iodine and 890 becquerels of radioactive cesium against the limits of 2,000 becquerels and 500 becquerels.

The announcement led the prefectural government to ask farmers to voluntarily refrain from shipping mushrooms in Iwaki.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 06:35:07 PM EST
Gov't aware of possibility of reactor core's meltdown before quake | Kyodo News

The government was aware of the possibility that the reactor cores of nuclear plants could partially melt down if all power supply equipment was crippled, making it impossible to cool down the cores' nuclear fuel, even before the March 11 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, according to last May's lower house minutes.

Nobuaki Terasaka, who heads the government's Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, said on May 26, ''It is logically possible for a reactor core to melt down if all outer electricity sources were lost, leading the plant's cooling functions to be lost for many hours,'' according to the minutes of a House of Representatives committee.

Terasaka also said the operators of Japanese nuclear plants ''have ensured safety'' by fitting the plants with multiple backup electricity sources. He was responding to a question from Japanese Communist Party legislator Hidekatsu Yoshii.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 06:36:40 PM EST
Why does a course in reactor physics 101 to politicians count as news?

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.
by Starvid on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 07:05:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
well it does cut off the "Evil corporations should have told us this was possible, and we'd have never allowed them to build it there if we'd known" defence

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 07:29:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
But I mean, doesn't everyone already know that if a nuclear core is not cooled, eventually it will suffer a meltdown?

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.
by Starvid on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 07:32:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Im sure there are many who think you just drop the contaimnment rods in and its turned off like a lightbulb.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 08:11:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Gov't eyes use of huge sheet to contain radioactive substances | Kyodo News

The government has asked Tokyo Electric Power Co., operator of the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, to study the possibility of containing radioactive substances from four damaged reactors by wrapping their entire containment buildings with a huge amount of sheeting, government sources said Sunday.

The proposal calls for building framed structures around the 45-meter-high containment buildings and then wrapping them with the sheeting, the sources said.

If all of the four buildings were wrapped in this manner, it would cost about 80 billion yen and take up to two months, the sources said.

But atomic energy experts are skeptical about the feasibility of the plan, proposed by a general construction firm, saying the step would have only limited effects in blocking the release of radioactive substances into the environment.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 06:37:46 PM EST
Gov't eyes use of huge sheet sparkly magic pony to contain radioactive substances | Kyodo News

Fixored.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 08:05:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
thats non traditional, local culture demands reptiles not mammals

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 08:19:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Didn't go well last time...
by LondonAnalytics (Andrew Smith) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 02:19:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
If they were to combine some sort of outer enclosure with a ventilation system that creates a slightly negative atmospheric pressure inside that enclosure and pumps the evacuated air through a water quenching tank they could significantly reduce the release of radioactive particles. But that entails doing three obvious things in combination and they seem unable even  to do one obvious thing to alleviate the radioactive water situation.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 01:23:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yeah, or they could have had a water quenching tank as a filter even before the accident, like many nuclear power plants have. But oh no.

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.
by Starvid on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 04:41:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thank G.E. for that.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Apr 6th, 2011 at 12:48:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
NHK WORLD English
Japan's Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency said a full-scale recovery of cooling systems at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant is needed to stem the leakage of radioactive substances, but that work will take several months.

A senior official of the agency, Hidehiko Nishiyama, made the comments at a news conference on Sunday.

Highly radioactive water was found inside turbine buildings and also in tunnels under the plant. The radioactive water is flowing directly into the sea.

The agency said it will take several months to remove the contaminated water in the turbine buildings and to take measures to protect workers from radiation.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 06:44:27 PM EST
Aircraft carrier may leave Japan for repairs - Navy News | News from Afghanistan & Iraq - Navy Times

SAN DIEGO -- Maintenance work on the aircraft carrier George Washington was continuing March 30 in waters off Japan, more than a week after it left its berth in Fleet Activities Yokosuka to escape radiation detected by the ship's sensitive equipment during a yard period.

But lingering worries about the failing Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, some 170 miles north of Yokosuka, raise questions: How long can George Washington sustain its selective restricted availability (SRA) while underway? If Yokosuka isn't available as a viable and safe yard, what other port in Japan and in the region can support a carrier that needs to finish its maintenance period? Would the Navy send its carrier out of the region, temporarily leaving the forward-deployed naval forces and return to stateside shipyards in San Diego; Bremerton, Wash.; or Pearl Harbor, Hawaii?



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 06:55:55 PM EST
The Yomiuri Shimbun -  Dosimeters, more food secured for N-plant crew

Tokyo Electric Power Co. has secured 920 dosimeters for personnel struggling to control the crisis at its Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant, resolving a shortage of the devices, a TEPCO spokesman told The Yomiuri Shimbun.

The company has also increased the workers' food rations from two meals a day to three, according to Keiichi Kakuta, manager of the plant's public relations department.

"The conditions they face are still arduous, but the situation is gradually improving," he said.

Kakuta has been staying nights at the plant to act as liaison between the Fukushima compound and TEPCO's head office.

The dosimeters were procured from various sources, he said, with 500 of them arriving from TEPCO's Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power plant in Niigata Prefecture on Friday.  




Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 09:03:27 PM EST
It's as if the only reason they will do things right is for PR reasons...

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 09:18:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It might have been better to have a corporate officer make the announcement. Then some might think that things are starting to be taken in hand.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 01:26:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Bloomberg - Tokyo Electric Sawdust Solution Fails to Stop Radiation Leak  

  A Tepco executive said yesterday he isn't optimistic about the prospect of containing damage at the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant's No. 3 reactor.

"I don't know if we can ever enter the No. 3 reactor building again," Hikaru Kuroda, the company's chief of nuclear facility management, said at a press conference.




Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 09:36:38 PM EST
The UN Would Never Lie to George Monbiot

And then we finish up with DemocracyNow, March 30 2011, live...

GEORGE MONBIOT:--that so far the death toll from Chernobyl amongst both workers and local people is 43. Am I--sorry, are you saying you didn't know that they had examined this--

HELEN CALDICOTT: That's a lie, George. That's a lie.

In sum: If you believe that less than fifty people died after the greatest nuclear meltdown in history, then I've got a fantastic house to sell you, mansion, pool, hot tub, everything. It's a steal... just outside Fukushima, Japan. Ocean view, stunning. Email me (George).

by das monde on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 10:00:49 PM EST
Then there's THIS.


The European Committee on Radiation Risk was formed in 1997 following a resolution made at a conference in Brussels arranged by the Green Group in the European Parliament.

The ECRRs remit is:

To independently estimate, based on its own evaluation of all scientific sources, in as much detail as necessary and using the most appropriate scientific framework, all of the risks arising from exposure to radiation, taking a precautionary approach.
To develop the best scientific predictive model of detriment following exposure to radiation, presenting observations which appear to support or challenge this model, and highlighting areas of research which are needed to further complete the picture.
To develop an ethical analysis and philosophical framework to form the basis of its policy recommendations, related to the state of scientific knowledge, lived experience and the Precautionary Principle.
To present the risks and the detriment model, with the supporting analysis, in a manner to enable and assist transparent policy decisions to be made on radiation protection of the public and the wider environment.
The committee now has more than 50 experts from many countries collaborating on the issue of radiation risk and has set up a number of sub-committees and groups. The committee's risk model was presented in 2003 in Brussels and is published as the ECRR2003 Recommendations: the Health Effects of Ionising Radiation Exposure at Low Dose for Radiation Protection Purposes (ISBN 1897761 24 4). The report, now in its second printing, has been widely circulated and translated and published in French, Russian, Spanish and Japanese.

Apologies if it's already been posted and i missed it.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

by Crazy Horse on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 02:26:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Here is a video of that interview.

By the way, notice Guardian in its fair and balanced form:

The incalculable cost of nuclear power
Despite the Fukushima catastrophe, nuclear energy has green advocates. Low carbon it may be, but are they pricing it right?
by Thomas Noyes

Fukushima: the future is unknown, but the present is terrible enough
We must not let our fear of the potential risks of radiation eclipse the real and present dangers the Japanese people face
by Jonathan Watts

by das monde on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 02:34:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Wait, George Monbiot of all people subscribes to the 50-dead count for Chernobyl?

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 04:16:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The best parts of the takedown are:

Joe Giambrone: The UN Would Never Lie to George Monbiot

The U.N./IAEA does concede (unlike George Monbiot) that their numbers are not definitive, and that the true death toll cannot be known very accurately, particularly with the methodology they chose to employ:
"It is impossible to assess reliably, with any precision, numbers of fatal cancers caused by radiation exposure due to Chernobyl accident."
(IAEA, p.7)

George Monbiot instead tells the world that this study produced the "official death toll from Chernobyl in 25 years."

Then there is
The actual study also left room for the tally to grow, without directly admitting that it was surely much higher:
"The international expert group predicts that among the 600 000 persons receiving more significant exposures... the possible increase in cancer mortality due to this radiation exposure might be up to a few per cent."
(IAEA, p.15)
Now "a few percent" of 600,000 people is a few multiples of 6,000 people (!). Large enough to dwarf the 43 deaths which I presume are limited to those due to acute radiation poisoning at the time of the accident and in its immediate aftermath. Or are they talking about "a fdew per cent" increase in the number of cancer deaths (a rather smaller number).
The "few per cent" are not included in what George Monbiot calls the "official death toll." Neither were the tens of thousands of stillbirths. And there is yet much dispute over spikes in nearly every type of cancer in those regions after 1986.
"Some radiation-induced increases in fatal leukaemia, solid cancers and circulatory system diseases have been reported in Russian emergency and recovery operation workers."
(IAEA, p.16)

Again, not reflected in Mr. Monbiot's magical "official" toll of "43."



Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 04:35:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Let me pitch Chernobyl's Downplayed Victims again: the numbers game is discussed in detail, including both the nuances and shortcomings of the Chernobyl Forum report.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 03:17:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by das monde on Wed Apr 6th, 2011 at 01:21:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
There are problems with Giambrone's attack on Monbiot, which is that he himself doesn't understand the things that he accuses Monbiot of not understanding.

Joe Giambrone: The UN Would Never Lie to George Monbiot

Monbiot and his cult of technofascism either fail to understand the difference between radiation that is outside the body vs. radiation that is trapped internal to the body, or else they know full well and just don't give a damn.

Dr. Caldicott:

"You don't understand internal emitters. ... They say it's low-level radiation. That's absolute rubbish. If you inhale a millionth of a gram of plutonium, the surrounding cells receive a very, very high dose. Most die within that area, because it's an alpha emitter. The cells on the periphery remain viable. They mutate, and the regulatory genes are damaged. Years later, that person develops cancer. Now, that's true for radioactive iodine, that goes to the thyroid; cesium-137, that goes to the brain and muscles; strontium-90 goes to bone, causing bone cancer and leukemia."
But then Giambrone accuses the IAEA:
In their own words:
"Because many organs and tissues were exposed as a result of the Chernobyl accident, it has been very common to use an additional concept, that of effective dose, which characterizes the overall health risk due to any combination of radiation. (emphasis in original)" (U.N./IAEA, 2006, p.12)
This statement reveals an unscientific bias, straight off the bat. Why should the U.N., while finding out how many people actually died from Chernobyl, need to rely on a fictional concept called "effective dose?"
The point is that the fact that Plutonium is more toxic inside the body than outside the body is captured by the concept of an "effecive dose". You can't both chastise Monbiot for failing to make the distinction and then the IAEA for weighting different sources of radiation acting differently on different tissues.

Not to speak of the fact that this is a filmmaker insulting a journalist over which experts to trust, which ends up being just a contest in argument by authority between two laymen, for the lay public.

What was it we were saying about those pesky little things called facts yesterday?

Facts by themselves are rather useless: only when supporting an argument do they become useful. And most of the arguments made every day are essentially 'emotional'. Whether or not we accept an argument is often an intuitive estimation of whether or not acceptance will make us feel better.


Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 04:44:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Not to go into calling Monbiot a shill, anti-intellectual, nonsense, technofascist cultist, bitch-slapped, moronic...

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 04:48:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I am rather baffled to see how terms of radiation, effective doses, absorbed doses are mixed up in the Sievert terminology. I see a sloppy scientific standard there.

Firstly, Sievert is a unit of dose, so it is questionable to use it to measure background radiation. If there are no living creatures to absorb any dose, whom are we kidding? When they use microsieverts in medical applications, they indeed talk about dose.

Secondly, Sievert is weighted both over radiation type and tissue. And obviously, when organs are hit randomly by background radiation, weighting by tissue makes no sense. You just get some average number, under conservative assumptions.

So I see quite several loopholes to obfuscate and abuse results of Sievert measurements. The weights are politically influenced by IAEA preferences, you can be sure. Here is an example how these Sieverts can lie: they say full-body scans give 5-8 milisieverts - but here the weighting factor is probably high. So saying "ah, this radiation is just a CT scan per day" can be badly misleading. (And besides, the two weightings need not be "multiplicative". Say, beta radiation may affect organs in different proportions than gamma.)

The term "effecive dose" as it is measured captures only very approximately that difference between outside and inside radiation. It does differ much whether a particle splits at your nose tip or in your lungs. So I share Giambrone's sentiment of "effective" unscientific bias. Weighting just by radiation type is ok - but that "measurement" should be distinguished from supposed weighting by tissues as well. And it would be great if the distinction between radiation and radioactivity would be reflected in terminology (and technically possible) - but sure, fast measurements of heavy particle concentrations must be tricky.

by das monde on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 05:24:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You have made this point before, and it is correct. One of the problems with this is that there isn't a single measure that captures the risks from radiation exposure.

The health effects of radiation depend on the kind of radiation (alpha, beta, gamma), its energy (kinetic), its intensity (time rate of emission), and the tissue affected. And then different kinds of tissues respond differently.

The way "effective dose" is defined is reminiscent of Drake's formula where, just because you have separated a factor (tissue sensitivity) and given it a multiplicative weight doesn't make the method "scientific". It also doesn't make it "unscientific", may be just cargo cult science.

In any case, the evil IAEA and WHO already incorporate the risk from radiation inside the body in their assessments. Otherwise, nobody would care much about plutonium contamination, since for all intents and purposes the health effects of plutonium come from ingested/inhaled plutonium, not from its contribution to "background radiation". None of this is controversial:

Plutonium - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Isotopes and compounds of plutonium are radioactive poisons that accumulate in bone marrow. ...

...

Even though alpha radiation does not penetrate the skin, it does irradiate internal organs if plutonium is inhaled or ingested.[33] The skeleton, where plutonium is absorbed by the bone surface, and the liver, where it collects and becomes concentrated, are at risk. ...

and making it sound like one side or the other of a debate is ignoring such things is less than helpful.

Maybe the "really scientific" way to give the data is to break it down by isotope, but then what does it mean?

Economics is politics by other means

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 05:41:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Can the whole weighting be explained and justified in a few lines?
by das monde on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 05:51:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
What do you mean?

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 05:56:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
What do I have to know (and have) to measure the "effective dose" on the street, without a custom ready shiny instrument?
by das monde on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 06:13:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
At a minimum you need to be able to measure ambient radiation by type:

Sievert - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Equivalency Weighting Factors[1] Radiation type and energy range Factor
electrons, positrons, muons, or photons (gamma, X-ray) 1
neutrons <10 keV 5
neutrons 10-100 keV 10
neutrons 100 keV - 2 MeV 20
neutrons 2 MeV - 20 MeV 10
neutrons >20 MeV 5
protons other than recoil protons and energy >2 MeV 2
alpha particles, fission fragments, nonrelativistic heavy nuclei 20
 
How are you going to do that "without a custom ready shiny instrument"?

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 06:25:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
So the Sievert is an estimate of the damage done by some combination of radioactivity present in an environment, and the accuracy of this estimate depends strongly on the degree to which various sources of that radiation is incopropated INTO living organisims?

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 11:05:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes here they're telling you that the cross-section of interaction of neutrons with living tissue is largest between 100 keV and 2 MeV.
neutrons 10-100 keV 10
neutrons 100 keV - 2 MeV 20
neutrons 2 MeV - 20 MeV 10
Which sort of makes sense: extremely energetic neutrons, being neutral particles, will just whizz past living matter having a shorter time to interact with atomic nuclei, while low-energy neutrons will have a low penetration depth.

But the specific numerical factors must have been determined empirically though who knows what procedures.

Rolf Maximilian Sievert - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Professor Sievert (Swedish pronunciation: [ˈsiːvəʈ]) was born in Stockholm, Sweden. He served as head of the physics laboratory at Sweden's Radiumhemmet from 1924 to 1937, when he became head of the department of radiation physics at the Karolinska Institute. He played a pioneering role in the measurement of doses of radiation especially in its use in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. In later years, he focused his research on the biological effects of repeated exposure to low doses of radiation. In 1964, he founded the International Radiation Protection Association, serving for a time as its chairman. He also chaired the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation.

He invented a number of instruments for measuring radiation doses, the most widely known being the Sievert chamber.



Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 11:10:36 AM EST
[ Parent ]
How are you going to do that "without a custom ready shiny instrument"?

To put it in other way, how can you verify what the "custom ready shiny instrument" is saying with more basic means? Do you know other measurements that are comparatively hard to replicate independently?  

by das monde on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 10:43:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
To put it in other way, how can you verify what the "custom ready shiny instrument" is saying with more basic means?

If you trust that the manufacturer is not completely full of shit, you can read the specifications to see whether it is capable of doing what you want it to do.

If you're just looking at one on TV, you have no way to reassure yourself that it does what the newsies claim it does. Even if the manufacturer is honest (which he usually is), and even if the newsie understands the difference between a dosimeter a Geiger counter (which he usually doesn't), the TV format is not conducive to providing verifiable facts.

When I see something measuring radiation on TV, I tend to assume that it's a Geiger counter, because those are sufficiently useful that you want them around and sufficiently simple (and cheap) that they can be issued in bulk. They also make better TV than dosimeters, because Geiger counters go click-click-click, while dosimeters are quiet until they tell you to haul ass (and a newsie won't be allowed to come along if there's even a remote chance that the dosimeter will tell him to haul ass at some point during the show). Geiger counters measure Becquerel, however, and any conversion from Bq to Sv/h must necessarily rely on some pre-set assumptions about the distribution of radioactive atoms and the ratio between ambient and internal exposure.

As a practical matter, you use the Geiger counter to tell whether you are in one of four kinds of situation:

  1. Safe, so far.

  2. Leave as soon as practical.

  3. OMFG GTFO NOW!

  4. You'll be dead within the hour anyway. Might as well get the job done while you're here.

You don't need three significant figures to make that distinction.

Do you know other measurements that are comparatively hard to replicate independently?

Oh, lots. Particulate pollution levels and pollen readings, just off the top of my head.

What I can not recall off the top of my head is one that combines this level of obscurity with quite so strong vested interests.

- Jake

Austerity can only be implemented in the shadow of a concentration camp.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 11:46:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Let's deconstruct this example: Polonium - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Alpha particles emitted by polonium will damage organic tissue easily if polonium is ingested, inhaled, or absorbed, although they do not penetrate the epidermis and hence are not hazardous if the polonium is outside the body. [edit] Acute effects

The median lethal dose (LD50) for acute radiation exposure is generally about 4.5 Sv.[36] The committed effective dose equivalent 210Po is 0.51 µSv/Bq if ingested, and 2.5 µSv/Bq if inhaled.

So, are we to understand that the effective dose for Polonium-210 is
  • 0 (negligible) if outside the body
  • 0.51 µSv/Bq if ingested
  • 2.5 µSv/Bq if inhaled


Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 06:07:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The greater weight assigned to alpha emissions is justified by the fact that alpha particles are really, really messy - they have both higher charge and higher momentum than beta, by a couple of orders of magnitude.

I don't know how the dose weighing by body part is done, but if I were doing it I would base it partly on the sensitivity of the tissue type hit, partly on how much I'd like to keep the organ in question and partly on how much any future kids would like me to keep the organ in question (so reproductive organs would get a comparatively higher weight due to the risk of germ line mutations).

External sources would be expected to hit salvage workers equally, while inhaled and ingested pollution hits your stomach, gut, lungs and chest first, then probably your liver and kidneys.

As an aside, I would not find "one extra CT scan a day" at all reassuring. CT scans are not harmless - they're just a lot less harmful than the stuff they are used to find.

- Jake

Austerity can only be implemented in the shadow of a concentration camp.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 06:07:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
JakeS:
I don't know how the dose weighing by body part is done, but if I were doing it I would base it partly on the sensitivity of the tissue type hit, partly on how much I'd like to keep the organ in question and partly on how much any future kids would like me to keep the organ in question (so reproductive organs would get a comparatively higher weight due to the risk of germ line mutations).
In addition, different cell types are more or less differentiated and therefore at different risk of cancer and mutation.

Very undifferentiated cells (stem cells) are the most sensitive to genetic damage and the most able to mutate into cancerous cells. This is why the bone marrow is so sensitive and low radiation to it causes leukemia (high radiation simply destroys the tissue). The same gows for the gonads. Highly differentiated cells are less susceptible to mutating into cancer cells - they are more likely to just die because of mutations than to survive as a cancer cell. Also, the ability to metasthasize is linked to how undifferentiated a cancer cell is, because a cell cannot just migrate and survive in the midst of another tissue. The closer a cell is to a stem cell, the easier it is.

Whether this can be captured by a multiplicative factor for committed equivalent dose is a different question...

Economics is politics by other means

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 06:13:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Sievert - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Tissue type Factor
 
bone surface, skin 0.01
bladder, breast, liver, esophagus, thyroid, other 0.05
bone marrow, colon, lung, stomach 0.12
gonads 0.20


Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 06:29:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Before we write off the IAEA, this presentation Biological effects of ionizing radiation at molecular and cellular levels (PowerPoint) seems quite good, and it explains the efect of what they call "indirect" effect of ionizing radiation, where radiation ionizes some atom or molecule and the products of this ionization are the ones that act on the DNA. There's in particular a slide where it is argued that because of the lifetime of OH- radicals in water, there is a tube around DNA where ionizing radiation can have an indirect effect on the DNA by ionizing the water.

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Apr 5th, 2011 at 01:03:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Looking back at Monbiot's now infamous article in The Guardian:  Japan nuclear crisis should not carry weight in atomic energy debate
Before I go any further, and I'm misinterpreted for the thousandth time, let me spell out once again what my position is. I have not gone nuclear. But, as long as the following four conditions are met, I will no longer oppose atomic energy.

1. Its total emissions - from mine to dump - are taken into account, and demonstrate that it is a genuinely low-carbon option

2. We know exactly how and where the waste is to be buried

3. We know how much this will cost and who will pay

4. There is a legal guarantee that no civil nuclear materials will be diverted for military purposes

To these I'll belatedly add a fifth, which should have been there all along: no plants should be built in fault zones, on tsunami-prone coasts, on eroding seashores or those likely to be inundated before the plant has been decommissioned or any other places which are geologically unsafe. This should have been so obvious that it didn't need spelling out. But we discover, yet again, that the blindingly obvious is no guarantee that a policy won't be adopted.

What is noteworthy in connection with the debate with Helen Caldicott is that Monbiot's "emissions" concers are entirely about CO2. He's assuming that "no radiation is released" if all the other conditions are met.

Giambrone quotes

When directed to the New York Academy of Sciences compendium of 5,000 of these translated studies on Chernobyl, George Monbiot simply dismisses these numerous studies as "cherry picking."

"Well, we have to use the best available science, not cherry-pick our sources..."

He uses this buzzword at least three times, as he also uses the "climate change deniers" smear again and again. This is Monbiot's style of so-called "debate."

So here we have a single-issue global warming advocate (Monbiot) accusing (or so Giambrone implies) a single-issue radiation contamination advocate (Caldicott) of being a climate change denier and coal advocate. I suppose then Monbiot can be accused of being an anthropogenic background radiation exacerbation denier.

Are we having fun yet?

Economics is politics by other means

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 05:13:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The problem with Monbiots proposition is the false dilemma: its only nuclear or coal. Plus, he implies that only total solutions are acceptable - so he mentions renewables asif only for politeness.

There are other alternatives, often complimentary. One clear unspoken alternative is to start consuming energy more prudently. It is a little dirty secret that energy supply is peaking now: peak oil is basically acknowledged; nuclear energy would not be growing much even without Fukushima (otherwise they would not be running old horses unduly long); renewables would not compensate enough. And this is in the world accustomed to continuous growth of energy supplies. If the world economy cannot live without that much energy - too bad for the economy. Trying to preserve the energy status quo is becoming a serious gamble for this civilization. If radiation is healthy in some doses, so must be a naked pressure to waste less energy. Otherwise this pressure comes out in awful political ways.

For example, today's political economy stands on the implicit promise of "sustained" some 3.5% economic growth in near future again. That's 100% in 20 years. In other words, we are supposed to buy twice as many TVs and go to a dentist twice as often in 20 years - or compensate with other "consumption" somewhere 4-8 times or more. In the latest growth decade the most consistently growing industry was financial, right? So now we have indebted nations and populations, and a few sort of revolutions around the Mediterranean. What will we have in 20 years?

by das monde on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 06:14:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
A false dilemma? Not to the Chinese, Indians, Brazilians, Indonesians, South Africans, Russians, Koreans, hell, even the Americans!

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.
by Starvid on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 04:54:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Migeru:
So here we have a single-issue global warming advocate (Monbiot) accusing (or so Giambrone implies) a single-issue radiation contamination advocate (Caldicott) of being a climate change denier and coal advocate. I suppose then Monbiot can be accused of being an anthropogenic background radiation exacerbation denier.

Are we having fun yet?

And indeed, the knives are out among the greens:

The unpalatable truth is that the anti-nuclear lobby has misled us all | George Monbiot | Comment is free | The Guardian

I began to see the extent of the problem after a debate last week with Helen Caldicott. Dr Caldicott is the world's foremost anti-nuclear campaigner. She has received 21 honorary degrees and scores of awards, and was nominated for a Nobel peace prize. Like other greens, I was in awe of her. In the debate she made some striking statements about the dangers of radiation. So I did what anyone faced with questionable scientific claims should do: I asked for the sources. Caldicott's response has profoundly shaken me.
(h/t Colman)

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Apr 5th, 2011 at 06:36:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
New rule of thumb: single issue campaigners are dead wrong.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Tue Apr 5th, 2011 at 06:43:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
But how can you campaign effectively unless it's single-issue?

(a question for the professionals such as Sven)

Economics is politics by other means

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Apr 5th, 2011 at 06:44:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh, you probably can't. We're fucked.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Tue Apr 5th, 2011 at 06:51:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That we are.

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Apr 5th, 2011 at 06:52:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Depends on the audience: what they already know, where they are prepared to go (what are they ready to listen to), what will make them active in some way.

If you step back far enough, any bunch of issues can be made into a single issue. You have to step back far enough for a graspable gestalt to appear. Typical framed gestalty issues would include justice, fairness, equality, survival etc. These gestalts tend to be the content of editorials.

But while 'single issue' is easier to create, the fundamental change in communication over the last 20 years has been the growing awareness that everything is connected to everything else. It is getting harder and harder to do 'single issue'.

I don't know how we will handle this problem. It is cropping up for me quite regularly now.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Tue Apr 5th, 2011 at 07:57:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Why do political pollsters keep asking people what they think the biggest problem is?

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Apr 5th, 2011 at 08:24:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
so they can look good to the most voters, rather than dealing with the problem in a way that might not be popular?

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Apr 5th, 2011 at 08:30:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
"Solved problems aren't news. Tell the press a story in two halves - the problem first and the solution later. Then they get a disaster story one day and triumph story the next."

- Humphrey, Yes Minister

Austerity can only be implemented in the shadow of a concentration camp.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Tue Apr 5th, 2011 at 08:41:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Sven Triloqvist:

the growing awareness that everything is connected to everything else. It is getting harder and harder to do 'single issue'.

I don't know how we will handle this problem. It is cropping up for me quite regularly now.

there are so many 'single issues' vying for prioritisation, though right now the global reality of 400+ potential fukushimas all depending on us keeping them chilled for millenia in a post fossil fuel, diminishing water reality is focussing a lot of minds, ditto exporting 'democracy *beta' to the oppressed (by 'our guys' bastards).

trying to keep two eyes on many balls in the air at once.

it's like in one's personal life, there's so much to do, each thing important, but none makes sense without the context of the others. if one gets too far ahead of the others, the kilter goes out.

the earth, our relationship to it, whether we use our knowledge to further befriend it, or to use it as a cheap goods depo/waste dump, how can anything trump that? without that we are a million more times more fucked than if the banks fail, or oil runs out and we have to remember how to stretch a bit more without some of the conveniences we have become used to.
the sins of the fathers... we have inherited the work of mad ancestors, as well as the genius.

to preserve the way of life of a privileged few we've hocked the future, gambled ecological balance for quick returns, and now we're up shit creek.

the are so many ways to be useful, so many examples to follow and reset. no need for many more new dots, more the need to connect the ones we have.

the privilege of living on this beautiful planet has a high price of knowledge to make it sustainable, today you may write something insightful, tonight you may dance, tomorrow you're studying your local watershed.

the only danger is the dilution of diffusion, becoming overwhelmed by the plethora of problems till you worry all the time and your spark feels too damped down to fire.

some will run with one issue, some (like most here) take a more polymath approach, so not to go so far out on one branch that they can't see the trunk any more.

humanity is like a diseased tree, still producing fresh, healthy growth, but with a blight eating away at its core.

some branches won't last long, others will. the game as i see it is to choose between them.

thanks to the discourse here, prioritisation becomes easier, if never easy.

managed decline never is, i guess.

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Tue Apr 5th, 2011 at 08:55:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Optimist!

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Apr 6th, 2011 at 12:56:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
doomer!
;)

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sun Apr 10th, 2011 at 04:02:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Via Physics Forums Thermal image of the four reactors.

http://www.mod.go.jp/j/approach/defense/saigai/tohokuoki/kanren/230403.pdf

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 04:52:40 AM EST
Cryptome
ge-bwr6.zip General Electric Boiling Water Reactor-Daiichi

Details fuel rod assembly design in more detail

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 07:57:20 AM EST
Weather agency ordered to reveal data on projected radiation spread | Kyodo News

The government has ordered the Japan Meteorological Agency to promptly disclose its data on the projected spread of radioactive materials from the troubled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station, the government's top spokesman said Monday.

Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said in a news conference that he had told the agency that it ''should have made the data public'' along with an adequate explanation.

According to Edano, the agency did not disclose the information because it was part of reference materials compiled in response to a request from the International Atomic Energy Agency, and it feared that releasing the data could cause misunderstanding about the spread of radiation.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 08:02:38 AM EST
NHK WORLD English
It has been learned that the Japanese government withheld the release of computer projections indicating high levels of radioactivity in areas more than 30 kilometers from the troubled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

The estimates were made on March 16th following explosions at the plant by an institute commissioned by the government using a computer system called SPEEDI. The system made its projections on the assumption that radioactive substances had been released for 24 hours from midnight on March 14th, based on the available data.

But the government was reluctant to reveal the SPEEDI projections, and did not release them until March 23rd.
The released data showed that higher levels of radioactive substances would flow over areas to the northwest and southwest of the plant.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 08:05:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Japan changes scope of restrictions on farm products | Kyodo News

The government decided Monday to change the scope of its restrictions on tap water and shipments of farm products based on radioactivity readings amid the continuing crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, though maintaining the current consumption limits for radioactive substances in them, its top spokesman said.

Following the release of radioactive particles from the tsunami-stricken nuclear plant, the government has restricted shipments of some farm products from four nearby prefectures and advised residents in some municipalities not to drink tap water.

But it will now impose such restrictions on agricultural products on a town basis, instead of blanketing the whole prefecture, Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said at a news conference.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 08:03:54 AM EST
NHK WORLD English
Tokyo Electric Power Company is releasing radioactive wastewater into the sea from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant as part of efforts to stabilize the troubled plant.

The utility started releasing 11,500 tons of wastewater on Monday evening.

The company says the level of iodine-131 in the wastewater is about 100 times the legal limit. But the plant operator says if people ate fish and seaweed caught near the plant every day for a year, their radiation exposure would be 0.6 millisievert. It adds the annual permissible level for the general public is one millisievert.

Wastewater will be released to make room for highly contaminated water from the No.2 reactor complex.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 08:05:59 AM EST
Once again the distinction between external and internal radiation is lost in the noise.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin
by Crazy Horse on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 08:58:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
People aren't goint to drink that water. It's salty, after all.

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.
by Starvid on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 04:57:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
But the sushi-to-be is. The original claim was:

But the plant operator says if people ate fish and seaweed caught near the plant every day for a year, their radiation exposure would be 0.6 millisievert.

- Jake

Austerity can only be implemented in the shadow of a concentration camp.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 05:40:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
NHK WORLD English
TEPCO first tried to pour concrete into the crack to halt the leak, but the attempt failed.

On Sunday, the company injected a mixture of absorbent polymers, sawdust and newspaper to try and clog the flow, but this has yet to absorb the water.

On Monday, workers tried to see if they could trace the pathway of the leak by dumping into the system a powder dye designed to turn water a milky white.

The colorant was poured into a tunnel leading to the pit, but no white water has appeared so far.

TEPCO now thinks the radioactive water may be coming from another source and is considering different strategies to find out where.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 08:06:59 AM EST
NHK WORLD English
Nearly 28,000 people are dead or missing in the March 11th earthquake and tsunami in eastern Japan.

According to the National Police Agency, 12,175 people have so far been confirmed dead.

The highest number of deaths is in Miyagi Prefecture -- 7,431 -- followed by 3,558 in Iwate Prefecture and 1,126 in Fukushima Prefecture.

The disaster caused deaths over a wide area from the northernmost prefecture of Hokkaido to Kanagawa Prefecture just south of Tokyo.

About 82 percent of the victims, more than 10,000, have been identified and the bodies are being handed over to their families.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 08:12:44 AM EST
The Daily Yomiuri (DailyYomiuri) on Twitter
German meteorological service releases image showing projected dispersal route of radiation from Fukushima N-plant. http://bit.ly/hjfUSt


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 08:58:10 AM EST
TEPCO to beef up monitoring team to raise data accuracy after errors | Kyodo News

Tokyo Electric Power Co. said Monday it will beef up its team for monitoring radiation levels in the environment affected by the ongoing crisis at its Fukushima nuclear plant, following errors last week that have undermined the credibility of its data.

The utility known as TEPCO said it will analyze radiation levels of air, groundwater, seawater and water that have been filling up the basement of reactor buildings and underground trenches with the help of third-party experts and officials of other utility firms.

The government's Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, which has admonished TEPCO twice for miscalculations, said the Fukushima plant operator is expected to seek support of organizations such as Japan Chemical Analysis Center and firms including Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 10:41:07 AM EST
GE's Immelt defends nuclear industry safety record | Reuters

(Reuters) - General Electric Co (GE.N) Chief Executive Jeffrey Immelt defended the nuclear industry's safety record on Monday during a trip to Tokyo to show support to the operator of a stricken nuclear plant using reactors designed by the U.S. conglomerate.

Immelt met with executives at Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO) (9501.T), operator of the Fukushima power plant that was crippled by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami and is leaking radiation in the worst nuclear accident since Chernobyl in 1986.

GE and its nuclear business partner Hitachi Ltd (6501.T) have sent over 1,000 workers to help with the so far unsuccessful efforts to get the plant under control.

<snip>

"But this is an industry that operated effectively for 40 years. And that's my expectation," he said.

A GE Japan spokeswoman later told Reuters that Immelt excluded the Chernobyl incident when referring to the industry's safety record over the past four decades because it did not involve facilities designed by Western or Japanese firms.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 11:09:34 AM EST
Japan nuclear crisis to trigger huge civil damages claims | Reuters

(Reuters) - Japan's nuclear crisis is likely to lead to one of the country's largest and most complex ever set of claims for civil damages, handing a huge bill to the fiscally strained government and debt-laden plant operator, Tokyo Electric Power Co.

Lawyers say the size of the claims could be the biggest in Japanese legal history and the lack of precedent for dealing with these incidents means it is still not clear how the claims will be handled.

"Potentially, this could be one of the largest civil claims historically in Japan because of the number of people affected," said George Gibson, a partner at law firm Norton Rose in Tokyo.

Japan's government expects the earthquake and tsunami to cost up to $300 billion in material damage, but the ultimate cost will be far bigger as economic activity shrinks due to power shortages and compensation claims mount.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 11:10:43 AM EST
TEPCO to drop plan to add 2 reactors at Fukushima nuclear plant | Kyodo News

The vice president of Tokyo Electric Power Co. said Monday that the company will withdraw its plan to build two more reactors at the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, following its submission of the plan to the government in late March.

''We now think it is impossible to add reactors,'' Takashi Fujimoto told a television program in reference to the plan to add two more reactors to the six-reactor plant.

The plant has been crippled by a series of explosions and radiation leaks triggered by the March 11 earthquake and ensuing tsunami.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 11:48:34 AM EST
These people have seriously slow reflexes...

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 11:50:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
This was TEPCO's Vice President.

Are we to understand the President is still AWOL?

Economics is politics by other means

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 12:25:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
From a couple of days ago

Tepco Chief Pressured to Quit After Costing Holders $29 Billion - Bloomberg

Shimizu hasn't faced reporters since attending a March 13 press conference. He has been taking the lead at the company's head office in central Tokyo in leading Tepco's response to the incident, spokesman Takeo Iwamoto said March 24. Yoshimi Hitosugi, another Tepco spokesman, declined requests for an interview with Shimizu for this article on March 25, citing his focus on the situation at the plant.

Shimizu became ill "through overwork" for a few days after March 16, and has since recovered, spokesman Kazufumi Suzuki said yesterday.

however some people have their priorities seriously out of whack

Tokyo Electric Power Co. President Masataka Shimizu is facing calls to quit after the crisis at the utility's Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear plant capped a tenure that has seen $29 billion wiped off the company's market value.

The share price decline since Shimizu took charge in June 2008 at Tepco, as the company is known, has deepened to 73 percent in the aftermath of the nuclear disaster, as of today's close in Tokyo. That's the worst performance of any of the 88 members of the MSCI World Utilities Index and of the 17 companies in the Topix Electric Power & Gas Index.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 12:43:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
here as this one has more than 300 comments already.

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Apr 4th, 2011 at 12:19:56 PM EST


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