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Phone hacking, a roundup Part 1

by ceebs Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 05:30:02 AM EST

In the past few months we have seen a sudden return to prominence of the News International phone hacking scandal after the New York Times published a magazine article.  This isn't the first time that this story has hit the streets in the UK and here's a brief rundown of the history up to the state of play roughly a month ago.  (I've been promising this for ages, but there have been things constantly getting in the way, by which time entire re-writes have been needed through new information have the first part of it.)


On the 13th of November 2005 the News of the World published a story about Prince William that he and a contact knew was only known to the two of them, there had been another similar story recently, leading the Prince to come to the conclusion that somebody was listening to his or his aides' answer phone messages.  After a seven-month investigation, police tracked the source of some of this activity to the offices of the News of the World, the Sunday tabloid of the Murdoch News International stable.  The police limited their search to the single reporter attached to the prince's story, although in their investigation they had apparently come across lists of thousands of mobile numbers, and a large number of PIN codes for those accounts and receipts for work on many other stories while the investigators were searching the offices of a private investigator used by various papers to provide plausible deniability about the "dark arts" (as they called them).  These dark arts consisted of more than just voicemail hacking, it also consisted of bribing police officers and civil servants at a variety of government agencies and phone companies to obtain private information about individuals.  There was even a case of one of the papers breaking into the offices of a subject of its investigations and installing wireless cameras and microphones in the offices of an associate of someone who was going to be the subject of a story.  Now the investigation revealed that it was the whole spectrum of UK tabloid newspapers that were involved in this activity.  The Murdoch press didn't even have the biggest bill amongst them.  There is a report into Operation Motorman, called What price privacy?, covering the police's investigation of a range of insiders, private detectives, civil servants, and police officers who were supplying illegal information to various journalists.
BBC | BBC College of Journalism Blog - Journalists and illegal information

What Price Privacy?' tells how:

"5.6 ... documentation seized at the premises of the Hampshire private detective ..."

That's to say, one target of Operation Motorman

"... consisted largely of correspondence (reports, invoices, settlement of bills etc) between the detective and many of the better-known national newspapers - tabloid and broadsheet - and magazines. In almost every case, the individual journalist seeking the information was named, and invoices and payment slips identified leading media groups. Some of these even referred explicitly to 'confidential information'."

The information, all illegally obtained and illegally traded, included criminal records, registered keepers of vehicles, driving licence details, ex-directory telephone numbers, itemised telephone billing and mobile phone records, and details of 'Friends & Family' telephone numbers.

The documents seized also included notes, invoices, receipts etc naming the journalists for whom the work had been carried out.


So it appears that the sort of activity that we are witnessing is not just the province of the Murdoch press but was instead endemic throughout the UK media, tabloid and Broadsheet. As further evidence of the widespread activity on the part of the UK Media we have this detail from back in 2002 that David Allen Green has noticed.
New Statesman - What did Dominic Mohan say in 2002?

Ring, a ring a story
How appropriate that the most glamourous event in the showbusiness calender should be sponsored by a phone company. Mohan went on to thank "Vodafone's lack of security" for the Mirror's showbusiness exclusives. Whatever does he mean?

Indeed, whatever could he have meant?

And what was known in the world of showbusiness journalism back in 2002?


What  was known in journalism in 2002? Well there is this quote from the UK Celebrity Gossip website Popbitch

Popbitch

Early in 2002 we were out at a party, talking to a group of showbiz reporters. They were shocked when they found out we didn't know the easy way to get celebrity stories. So they told us how they all did. We printed it in issue 107 - 13th March 2002:

Two hacks call a celeb's mobile. One gets the answerphone, and types in 9, followed by 3333. If the hapless celeb hasn't changed the default access code, the hack gets their messages, and can even delete them afterwards to cover their tracks.

If all the juniors (and it wasn't even the NOTW) knew, we're gob-smacked that the editor of the most successful red-top, who had been a showbiz hack before them, didn't.


In 2007 Clive Goodman, the paper's royal correspondent, and Glen Mulcaire, the private investigator employed by the paper were sentenced after being found guilty.  This was followed by a House of Commons select committee investigation (The equivalent of a US senate committee) where News International management insisted that this was an isolated case committed by a reporter who had stepped outside the boundaries of what was considered proper behaviour for one of their staff.

In the committee's report (Self regulation of the press:HC375)(pdf warning) the committee says

We note the assurances of the Chairman of News International that Mr Goodman was acting wholly without authorisation and that Mr Coulson had no knowledge of what was going on. We find it extraordinary, however, that the News of the World was prepared to apply one standard of accountability to the £105,000 retainer paid to Mr Mulcaire and another, far weaker, standard to the substantial cash payments paid to Mr Mulcaire by Mr Goodman. The existence of a "slush fund" effectively can only further the belief that editors condone such payments--on a "no need to know" basis--as long as they provide good copy.

At this point the committee was under the impression that this activity had really only been the work of the royal correspondent and News international has always maintained this to be the case.  The Metropolitan Police, who had investigated the case, had said that there were only a handful of cases.  The Guardian's examination of phone company records showed that the number were at least 90

A year later however two victims of the acknowledged handful had each been on the verge of taking News International to court.  News International settled with each out of court for large amounts of cash, the two payouts totalling over £1 million between them according to reports.  These two were Gordon Taylor, the head of the Professional Footballers Association, and Max Clifford, a Publicist who acts for a variety of UK celebrities.  The fact that these two had been paid out to by the Murdoch organisation drew attention back to the NOTW claims that the phone hacking was just the action of a single lone reporter, it was remotely plausible that Clifford may have some royal contacts that the paper's royal reporter may have been interested in, but to suggest that he might have an interest in professional football to the extent that he might spend his employer's money on acquiring the players' union head's phone messages rather seems to stretch the credibility of the NOTW's answers.  It must be said however that it may be that these payments may have occurred as a defensive measure to prevent lawyers crawling through the paper's internal documentation, but this would be a remarkably expensive way of preventing such activity.  The publication of the US investigation returned the Met and the Crown Prosecution Service to the original notes.  The police called in the reporters mentioned and, according to their lawyers, questioning them under oath as suspects rather than as witnesses.  Understandably under legal advice they therefore refused to give evidence.  However, senior News International executives refused to be questioned, as they didn't think there was anything they could add to their earlier evidence; and Andy Coulson was questioned without being put under oath.  This was taken to be a little suspicious, but with the appearance of no new evidence, the Met and the CPS had an excuse to shut the investigation down once again.

All was then quiet till the Tommy Sheridan trial in Scotland.  Tommy had formerly successfully sued the NOTW for libel after it published lurid articles about his sex life.  A court case had been winding its way through the legal system charging that Tommy had perjured himself.  And Tommy decided to call Andy Coulson as a defence witness.  Once again Coulson denied any knowledge of phone hacking, for the first time in court, and during a perjury trial.  One would think that if it turns out he perjured himself during a perjury trial, things would not go at all well for him in subsequent hearings.

Quiet then returned, until depositions were made in the Sienna Miller case.  She had been convinced that information must have been acquired for a story about her by hacking, and once she acquired documentation from the police, it appeared that there was solid evidence about another News of the World journalist.  Someone who has risen to the post of deputy editor.  NOTW suspended him and he was then interviewed by the paper's lawyers.  At this point Coulson resigned.  Several news organisations leaped to the conclusion that names had been named, leading his lawyers to issue a statement saying that any suggestion that Coulson had been named by her was highly defamatory.  Unnoticed in the background, the CPS had announced that a barrister would be examining all of the paperwork in the hands of the police.  It is thought that this may be far more of a threat than one individual naming names.

On top of this a new round of evidence had been deposited with the culture, media and sport department.  One of the Sun's former journalists has entered into evidence that he was personally instructed by Coulson to tap people.  This is something that Coulson has always denied.  If the full evidence had been leaked to Number Ten ahead of time, this may also be something that might have been seen to raise intolerable pressure, and so Coulson may have leaped before he was pushed.

This is the first of eight cases that are in the process of coming to court.  Mainly resulting from celebrities who have had to legally fight quite severely to even get the basic information from the hands of the Metropolitan Police.

There are three other major strands of evidence also in existence that are yet to appear.  Firstly (and least likely to appear), a legal firm did a thorough investigation of all available evidence in the possession of the NOTW, this has never been made public or handed over to the police, and could be quite revealing, but as it has been created by lawyers it may be held to be privileged.  The second strand of evidence is a selection of micro-cassettes held by individual News International reporters.  According to a reporter there was a culture of paranoia involved in working there, to the extent that the staff regularly recorded their conversations and phone calls with each other.  At least one of these tapes has come to light, although it doesn't show Coulson actually ordering phone tapping, it does involve him praising the recently sacked reporter and praising him for going to lengths to get a story.  The third strand is a horde of backup computer drives stored in the NOTW's warehouse.  We know that the initial investigation involved looking at 2500 emails, this is an amazingly small amount and we can only assume that it was either just the initial emails from the sacked member of staff – and only the outbound email, legally in the UK an employer only has a right to examine outgoing email, if an individual has personal email that has been sent to an inbound email address then the employer is not allowed to look.  Now employers normally ignore this quirk as they consider it, but you can bet that in this case they have obeyed the letter of the law so they didn't have to find anything embarrassing.  Now they claim to have looked at the entire email system, but one would doubt that that quantity of email would come from more than a single account.

The renewed police inquiry has brought up some interesting details, including the fact that people who have previously asked for information had been misled by the earlier investigators.  An example of this is Lord Prescott
Phone hacking: Lord Prescott named as victim as inquiry widens | Media | The Guardian

The development represents Scotland Yard finally beginning to take the lid off the phone-hacking scandal. More than five years after they first started to investigate the illegal interception of voicemail messages by a private investigator working for the News of the World, the Met announced that its new inquiry would:

* Review all the decisions made by their two previous inquiries.

* Contact thousands of public figures who have never been told that their personal details were recorded by the private investigator.

* Warn some public figures that they had previously been misled when they asked the Yard for information.

Police had been dismissive of Prescott's suspicions that he had been targeted, but the head of the new investigation, Deputy Assistant Commissioner Sue Akers, saw Prescott on Wednesday. He was told that invoices recovered by police showed he was targeted by Glenn Mulcaire, the private eye used by the NoW, who was an expert in phone hacking. They also have notes made by Mulcaire about Prescott, who as deputy prime minister was in possession of highly sensitive information. After his briefing by the police chief, Prescott told the Guardian that previous police investigations had been "completely inadequate".

The main thrust of the investigation is now widening, it appears that there may be a civil complaint brought against another News International newspaper, The Sun, which is the Monday to Saturday equivalent of the NOTW.  The timescale of the complaint means that it is from the time when Rebekah Brooks, the current head of News International's news division was editor.  NI have of course denied this, and Rebekah has denied that this occurred outside the named reporter and investigator at a House of Commons select committee meeting; so there could be a considerable amount of embarrassment and various contempt and perjury charges coming up as the evidence points harder and deeper at the senior management of the News International group.  (And if this all comes out before the final decision is made on the takeover of BSkyB, then it could end up costing the Murdoch empire in the region of £400 million per year, if as a result management staff and processes are seen as being unfit, and so the takeover is banned.)

As of this morning it has been announced that the new police investigation is contacting 1000 people for whom there may be enough evidence that their phones have been hacked.  This is a considerable increase from the original grudging number that the original police investigation came up with.  The new investigation says according to AP that there are roughly 2500 people that will need to be contacted.

Questions that need asking.

Why did the met recognise so few people as probably being hacked in the first place?

Why was the investigation at the NOTW so limited?  After Mulcaire's office had been investigated, it was obvious that the problem ran much wider than one individual journalist.

Why didn't the person leading the investigation subsequently leaving and going to work for NI not ring considerable alarm bells?  Surely this would at least raise a few warning flags.  Not saying that he has done anything, but as a policy surely this raises suspicions that the activity has not been above-board, and so should be thoroughly investigated.

Why are newspapers concentrating so much on minor celebrity news that is so liable to this sort of problem?

How many members of staff at the NOTW were regularly using this method of obtaining stories?

What other papers had such a culture of tapping and privacy invasion through illegal means?

Display:
Have Part one of my Brooks/Murdoch/Coulson diary  paor tomorrowrt 2 later today


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 05:35:17 AM EST
Good roundup.

It's easy to have the opinion that there may be - let's say - worryingly close links between News Int and the Met. An independent investigation would be a useful thing.

Another question that needs asking: has this been happening in other countries?

And technically: how did NOTW get pin codes, if the standard technique is to hope the default code hasn't been changed?

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 05:56:08 AM EST
From ET, years ago:



Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 06:08:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
well on the Pin codes, there were four main methods, either hope that the numbers hadn't been changed, try a selection of likely ones (its amazing the number of people who will change from 0000 to 1111 and think its going to work, or the number of teenage girls whose pin is 5683 (which when converted to letters spells love) took security of geeks ages to work out why that one was happening) the third method was to ring up and impersoante the user or the police and persuade phone companies to either provide the pin number, or change it, changing it is obviously not the preferrred method because that shuts the users access to the mailbox down, and they might get suspicious. The fourth method doesn't really work anymore. in the early days of mobiles, when everyone didnt have one, the reporter would give a pay as you go phone to the subject, with a few quid of credit on, "so they can get in touch" having already set up the security to "Keep them safe"  subject then goes round and gives everyone their shiney new mobile number, and reporter has access to the  box because they set the phone up

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 06:11:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Science Daily: Dial 5683 for Love: Dialing Certain Numbers On a Cell Phone Changes Your Emotional State
For the study, Sascha Topolinski and his students at the University of Würzburg in Germany created a list of German words that can be typed on a cell phone keypad without typing the same digit twice in a row. Also, each number combination could spell only one word.

For one experiment, Topolinski used a set of number sequences that correspond to positive words, like 54323 ("liebe" -- love) and 373863 ("freund" -- friend), and a set for negative words, like 7245346 ("schleim" -- slime) and 26478 ("angst" -- fear). Volunteers were handed a cell phone with stickers over the buttons so they could only see the numbers, not the corresponding letters, and were told to type the number sequences. After typing each one, they rated how pleasant it had been to dial the number on the phone. Volunteers believed they were participating in a study on ergonomics -- in the debriefing afterward, none had any idea that the numbers might relate to words.

On average, volunteers preferred dialing numbers that related to positive words over those related to negative words. Merely dialing the numbers that corresponded to those letters -- not even pushing them multiple times, as you'd usually do to text words on a 10-digit keypad -- was enough to activate the concepts in their minds.



Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 06:24:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Apparently Vodaphone default all their security codes to 3333, so all a hack needed to do was ring the phone to ensure nobody answered, then dial 9 for ansaphone messages and try 3333 to see if they got in.

Most people don't change  their pin codes so it invariably works.

Also, vodaphone have a notoriously leaky security system (so I read)

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 08:21:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Privacy international: PHR2006 - Kingdom of Spain
Wiretapping and Surveillance Rules

Under the criminal code, interception of electronic communications requires a court order. There have been several scandals in Spain over illegal wiretapping by the intelligence services. In 1995, Deputy Prime Minister Narcis Serra, Defense Minister Julian Garcia Vargas, and military intelligence chief Gen. Emilio Alonso Manglano were forced to quit following revelations that they had monitored the conversations of hundreds of people, including King Juan Carlos. More recently, Juan Alberto Perote, the former head of operations of the Centro Superior de Información de la Defensa (CESID, the Spanish secret service, which was part of the armed forces until it was replaced by the CNI in 2002), was found guilty on April 12, 2005, and sentenced to four months in prison. In the first trial in 1999, Manglano and Perote both received sixth-month sentences and five CESID officers were sentenced to six months, although the Constitutional Tribunal annulled this ruling on March 29, 2004 after it deemed that the judge who heard the case was not impartial. Charges brought against Emilio Alonso Manglano and the five CESID officers by private individuals and groups placed under surveillance were dropped. Perote criticised the decision against him, claiming that his director, Manglano, and members of the Socialist Party government of the time knew about "this activity," which was carried out between 1983 and 1991.



Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 06:12:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Why are newspapers concentrating so much on minor celebrity news that is so liable to this sort of problem?

What makes you think it's limited to minor celebrities?

How good do you think an MP's security is?

- Jake

Austerity can only be implemented in the shadow of a concentration camp.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 07:10:21 AM EST
Im sure it isn't good,

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 08:32:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Why did the Met acknowledge so few ? Because the original complaint was about hacking Royalty. All other crimes were irrelevant to the scope of that inquiry.

Now you could say that the police should investigate crimes that they discover, but as it is widely acknowledged that police officers and tabloid crime reporters, particularly on NotW, have a mutually "beneficial" relationship, I would imagine that the officers involved lacked enthusiasm to disrupt their cosy little schemes

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 08:24:43 AM EST
if you can pick up BBC Parliament, the debate is about to start.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 08:39:49 AM EST
Chris Bryant says NoTW also targeted cases of Madeleine McCann, Danielle Jones, Daniel Morgan..and even cops probing NoTW

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 08:45:31 AM EST
This is gonna get better.

I just hope that all of these people sue the NotW for all they've got. The celebrities backed away a bit cos the public kinda think they deserve it, but this time the public want blood (or, more painful to Murdoch, money)

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 08:55:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Called for resignation of Brooks and Yeates at the met as they should both take responsibility

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 09:07:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
"Were NI to apply to run a mini cab firm in London they would be refused a licence.." Frank Dobson MP on BSkyB  licence bid

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 09:24:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
@paulwaugh: Ex police minister @DavidHansonMP points out Lord MacDonald gave him assurances re hacking. New can of worms..

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 09:33:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Lord MacDonald the former DPP, now with Matrix Chambers - Cherie Blair's old haunt?

That's not a can of worms, it's a silo of political sewage.

This is going to get very interesting indeed.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 09:42:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
things did get a bit hairy at that position of the discussion

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 09:51:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Tom Watson: Brooks was paying police officers and doing so for convicted criminals #phonehackind

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 10:14:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Also accusing James Murdoch & Rebekah Brooks of covering up and attempted destruction of data  Perverting the course of Justice.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 10:16:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
named another NI employee who was police say they had a meeting with Rebekah Brooks and named over ban attempt to discredit a policeman and his wife in an attempt to derail the investigation of a private eye who worked for News International

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 10:19:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 11:37:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
cases of Madeleine McCann, Danielle Jones, Daniel Morgan..

Who are these people/what were their cases?

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 10:26:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Disappearance of Madeleine McCann - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Madeleine McCann disappeared on the evening of Thursday, 3 May 2007. She was on holiday with her parents and twin siblings in the Algarve region of Portugal. The British girl went missing from an apartment, in the central area of the resort of Praia da Luz, a few days before her fourth birthday, and has still not been found. Madeleine's parents, Kate and Gerry McCann, have said that they left the children unsupervised in a ground floor bedroom while they ate at a restaurant about 120 metres (130 yards) away.[1]

Murder of Danielle Jones - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The murder of Danielle Jones was an English murder case where no body was found and the conviction relied upon forensic authorship analysis of text messages sent on the victim's mobile phone. Danielle Sarah Jones,[1] (16 October 1985 - c. 18 June 2001), was last seen alive on 18 June 2001; her body has never been found.

Jones' uncle Stuart Campbell, a builder, was convicted of abduction and murder on 19 December 2002. Campbell was sentenced to life imprisonment for murder as well as 10 years for abduction.

After the trial, controversy arose when it was revealed Campbell had prior convictions for indecent assault on other girls of similar ages.[2] The use of forensic authorship analysis of text messages in the case provoked research into its use in other cases.[3]

Daniel Morgan was murdered. Now it seems justice is dead too | Duncan Campbell | Comment is free | The Observer

It will be 20 years tomorrow since the release, following their successful appeal at the Old Bailey, of the Birmingham Six, the victims of one of the gravest of miscarriage of justice cases of our times. But another scandalous miscarriage of justice case, also stretching over nearly a quarter of a century, reached its conclusion in the same court last Friday and it did not involve anyone serving a single day of a jail sentence.

A young, energetic private eye called Daniel Morgan was found with an axe embedded to the hilt in the side of his face in the car park of a south London pub on 10 March, 1987. Since then there have been no fewer than five police investigations into his death but no one has ever been convicted of his murder. The fifth of those inquiries juddered to a halt in court 14 of the Old Bailey on Friday morning when the judge accepted the admission of prosecution counsel, Nicholas Hilliard QC, that to proceed with the trial of the three men charged with the murder would be "oppressive" and "unfair." In the place where the jury normally sits were members of Morgan's family: his elderly mother, his widow, his daughter, his sister and his brother, Alastair. They watched in silence and in resignation as the judge, Mr Justice Maddison, listened to the formal discontinuation of the case.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 10:35:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Now this is a possible mess

(1) David Allen Green (DavidAllenGreen) on Twitter

Someone has left comment at http://bit.ly/pmYJwh wondering if NotW evidence tampering would mean a mistrial and new trial re Dowler? Gosh.

(1) David Allen Green (DavidAllenGreen) on Twitter

Thinking aloud: given most (if not all) evidence was circumstantial re abduction then does appear relevant that voice-messages were deleted.

Milly B (_millymoo) on Twitter

@DavidAllenGreen I think the defence should have known. It's appalling Surrey knew and didn't tell CPS

Milly B (_millymoo) on Twitter

Police not telling the CPS the phone had been hacked. Not a decision for them

Milly B (_millymoo) on Twitter

They didn't tell the CPS therefore not disclosed to defence. That's the point

David Allen Green (DavidAllenGreen) on Twitter

Thinking Aloud: and at a retrial, Bellfield defence will surely take prejudicial publicity point. What a god-awful mess it would be.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 09:50:37 AM EST
NI to claim Rebekah Brooks was on holiday during Dowler phone hacking | Media | guardian.co.uk

News International is planning to relieve the pressure on its beleaguered chief executive, Rebekah Brooks, by claiming she was on holiday when a mobile phone belonging to Milly Dowler was hacked into in 2002 by the News of the World, the paper she edited at the time.

The Guardian understands that the company has established that Brooks, News of the World editor from May 2000 until January 2003, was on holiday in Italy when the paper ran a story which referred to a message that had been left on the teenager's phone. The article, which was about a message left by an employment agency on the murdered schoolgirl's mobile, was published on 14 April 2002.

News International also believes Brooks was also away in the two weeks following the murder of Holly Wells and Jessica Chapman in Soham. It is thought that mobile phones belonging to the parents of the two girls were targeted in the days following their death.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 10:12:46 AM EST
BBC quotes Murdoch - hacking allegations "deplorable" and "unacceptable" but investigation will continue under Rebekah Brooks leadership

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 11:39:37 AM EST
What is deplorable? The hacking or the allegations?

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 11:53:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
statement from Rupert Murdoch: "Recent allegations of phone hacking and making payments to police with respect to the News of the World are deplorable and unacceptable. I have made clear that our company must fully and proactively cooperate with the police in all investigations and that is exactly what News International has been doing and will continue to do under Rebekah Brooks' leadership. We are committed to addressing these issues fully and have taken a number of important steps to prevent them from happening again.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 12:01:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
ceebs:
proactively cooperate with the police

Dunno how you do that, unless it means walk into the local nick and hand out fivers.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 12:10:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
it's like the "taken a number of important steps to prevent them from happening again. " I took that to be putting more cash inside the brown envelopes.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 12:17:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It means hack into their phones so that you can tell them what they want to know before they have to ask.
by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 12:27:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Murdoch calls allegations 'deplorable' but NotW's £12m advertisers stand firm - Media news - Media Week

The commercial pressure on News International appeared to be mounting today, as a number of major brands announced that they were either withholding or reviewing their advertising spend with the News of the World in light of the allegations.

However, a further examination into the newspaper's biggest top 10 advertisers in the past 12 months, as tracked by Nielsen, highlights that despite the headlines and prevailing mood, not one of its major advertisers has withdrawn its advertising.

It may come as little surprise to those in the media industry to learn that out of the paper's leading advertisers, only one has pledged full support and announced no plans to review the situation - BSkyB.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 12:15:53 PM EST
oliver king (oliverjamesking) on Twitter
Met Police have just confirmed to @adavies4 that Rebecca Brooks was at that meeting discussing NOTW interference in a murder inquiry


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 12:31:38 PM EST
Andrew Collins (AndrewCollins) on Twitter
Suggested title for inevitable Hollywood thriller based on #NOTW phone-hacking scandal: Dial M For Murdoch


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 12:34:08 PM EST
(Slightly off-topic)

The NSA routinely cracks mobile telephone conversations.  

Been known since Day One mobile telephones are not secure and cannot be made secure.  Anything going out on the airwaves can be grabbed and hacked.  The people who got screwed by Murdoch made it easier but even if they had protected their accounts their conversations could still have been over-heard if enough time, energy, and money had been thrown at the problem.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 01:27:18 PM EST
their conversations could still have been over-heard if enough time, energy, and money had been thrown at the problem.

That's true of everything.

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 01:33:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Not really.

Slap a 256k encryption key on your correspondence, and you'll keep out major corporations and serious governments.

- Jake

Austerity can only be implemented in the shadow of a concentration camp.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 03:12:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No, not if they really want to read it.

For starters, they can beat the key out of you.

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 03:15:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Sure, but rubber hose cryptanalysis, while computationally inexpensive, is difficult to perform unnoticed. And it is frowned upon in most jurisdictions.

Besides, if someone is prepared to beat you over the head to read your mail, then you probably have bigger problems than people reading your mail.

- Jake

Austerity can only be implemented in the shadow of a concentration camp.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 03:30:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Besides, most people aren't going to find it easy to remember a 256k key, unless it's stored as a passphrase.

The UK has legislation that allows the police to jail anyone who doesn't supply keys on demand. But if you're really serious about security you can use advanced crypto to hide the fact that you have things to hide.

While the NSA might not be fooled, the local plod may well be.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 03:51:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
They don't have to remember it. Just build a public key encryption scheme into the phone, and assign it (or the SIM card) a random key from the factory. It shouldn't be possible to compromise that without hardware access (and if they have hardware access then you are, as a rule, pretty much fucked anyway). The secret police will probably insist that the keys are stored so they can be made available on demand, but that should still keep most governments and the lion's share of corporations out of your phone.

- Jake

Austerity can only be implemented in the shadow of a concentration camp.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 04:06:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
their conversations could still have been over-heard if enough time, energy, and money had been thrown at the problem.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 04:06:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A 256k key makes getting the data expensive. If someone wants to badly enough they can get it. The attacks on the phones were on known individuals. Encryption is most useful to prevent trawling attacks - it's too expensive to decrypt all traffic or work around its encryption (you're quite sure there's no keylogger on your machine, right? right?). If your opponent is well resourced and targeting you directly, you're screwed unless you're extremely disciplined.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 04:05:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, I'm quite sure I don't have keyloggers on my box. And we're talking about defending yourself from some script kiddie private eye, not from the KGB.

- Jake

Austerity can only be implemented in the shadow of a concentration camp.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 04:09:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, my wife's ATM card was hacked a few weeks ago after she used it exactly once. In Dulles airport, unfortunately--the same place my card got hacked about a year ago. I don't know if it was somebody watching her or one of those add-on things that intercept the card reader--I wasn't there--but she is reasonable aware of her surroundings and was completely flummoxed. Moral: Never use your credit or ATM card in an airport.

I think there is a fundamental law of information physics involved in all this. If you want a paper to be secure, you put it in a "secret" folder in a locked file cabinet in a locked room in a locked building. It's a hassle to get at it, but it's pretty secure. If you want to keep your file secure, you encrypt it, you use a good key distribution system, you require complex passwords, and you force people to change their access routine regularly. It's a hassle to get at it, but it's pretty secure. Fundamentally, I propose, the difficulty of access for approved users (you) is a proxy for the fundamental security of the overall system--regardless of the access method, physical or electronic.

by asdf on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 06:21:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
As xkcd put it:



Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 03:59:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
PCC issues statement saying following today its no longer standing by its 2009 report on phone hacking.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 01:49:20 PM EST
What the papers won't say | The Spectator

Let's try a thought experiment. Let's imagine that BP threw an extravagant party, with oysters and expensive champagne. Let's imagine that Britain's most senior politicians were there -- including the Prime Minister and his chief spin doctor. And now let's imagine that BP was the subject of two separate police investigations, that key BP executives had already been arrested, that further such arrests were likely, and that the chief executive was heavily implicated.

Let's take this mental experiment a stage further: BP's chief executive had refused to appear before a Commons enquiry, while MPs who sought to call the company to account were claiming to have been threatened. Meanwhile, BP was paying what looked like hush money to silence people it had wronged, thereby preventing embarrassing information entering the public domain.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 03:20:44 PM EST
Tomorrow mornings Daily Telegraph is apparently leading with the Hacking of families of War dead, this is  getting close to torches and pitchforks

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 05:10:44 PM EST
BBC News - Dead soldiers' families 'hacked by newspaper'

Phones owned by relatives of dead UK soldiers were allegedly hacked by the News of the World, a national newspaper reports.

The Daily Telegraph claims the phone numbers of relatives of dead were found in the files of private investigator Glenn Mulcaire.

This comes after Prime Minister David Cameron said he would set up a public inquiry into alleged phone hacking.

Rupert Murdoch, the paper's owner, has called claims of hacking "deplorable".



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 05:14:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Nick Robinson, The BBC's political corespondent (and ex-tory) just quoted a New international insider as saying "If Miliband thinks he can win [against Murdoch] he's about to be proved v, v wrong." Rebekah is Family and this is a family business"

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 05:51:05 PM EST
Miliband!? What does he have to do with it?

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 06:43:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
well he got up in PMQ's and laid into News International, Brooks and Cameron.

It's a desperate move by Don Rupert and the boys to repaint the story as party political so that the tories rally round the party and fight against Milliband, and hence protect the Murdoch gang. with tonights revelations, most tory mp'sd will be telling the party whips that if they even look like  supporting Murdoch they can say goodbye to any votes come the next election

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 07:10:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'll mention in passing that a long time ago I had a brief encounter with someone who lived next to a journo who worked for a famous tabloid.

There were a number of stories, not least of which was that it wasn't unusual for the journo to supply drugs to various informants who might feel a need for them, as long as they returned the favour with juicy information.

"Tip of the iceberg" was said, repeatedly.

So if a proper investigation happened, phone tapping might not even be the most significant offence.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 07:27:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
people ive talked to in the last few weeks have been remarkably similar in what they've said.

tip of the iceberg? more a whole field of letuices.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 07:37:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
David Cameron is in the sewer because of his News International friends - Telegraph Blogs

The Prime Minister cannot claim in defence that he was naively drawn in to this lethal circle. He was warned - many times. Shortly before the last election he was explicitly told about the company he was keeping. Alan Rusbridger - editor of The Guardian newspaper, which has performed such a wonderful service to public decency by bringing to light the shattering depravity of Mr Murdoch's newspaper empire - went to meet one of Mr Cameron's closest advisers shortly before the last election. He briefed this adviser very carefully about Mr Coulson, telling him many troubling pieces of information that could not then be put into the public domain.

Mr Rusbridger then went to see Nick Clegg, now the deputy prime minister. So Mr Cameron and Mr Clegg - the Prime Minister and the Deputy Prime Minister - knew all about Mr Coulson before last May's coalition negotiations. And yet they both paid no attention and went on to make him the Downing Street director of communications, an indiscretion that beggars belief.

Jason Lower (jasonlower) on Twitter

@arusbridger Are Oborne's assertions that you briefed Clegg and Cameron on Coulson prior to the coalition talks true?

alan rusbridger (arusbridger) on Twitter

@jasonlower Clegg directly; Cameron via an intermediary


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 06:12:45 PM EST
Mr Rusbridger then went to see Nick Clegg, now the deputy prime minister. So Mr Cameron and Mr Clegg - the Prime Minister and the Deputy Prime Minister - knew all about Mr Coulson before last May's coalition negotiations. And yet they both paid no attention and went on to make him the Downing Street director of communications, an indiscretion that beggars belief.
So yesterday night Clegg sent an email to LibDems which begins thusly:
I'm sure like me you have been shocked and appalled by the allegations of widespread phone hacking by the News of the World. As I made clear at Deputy Prime Minister's Question Time in the House of Commons yesterday the behaviour of those involved is grotesque and beneath contempt.


Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Jul 7th, 2011 at 02:32:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 6th, 2011 at 07:18:12 PM EST
fan-f..ing tastic

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Jul 7th, 2011 at 01:13:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Why are we meant to be surprised that fundamentally indecent businesses do indecent and illegal things? The tabloid press's basic trade is in creating and marketing human misery, in distracting from the powerful, not holding them to account. They're basically morally bankrupt: of course they do terrible things.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Jul 7th, 2011 at 02:51:58 AM EST
This, is a defence of the tabloids, if you like. In the Spectator.

Last two paragraphs:


Now, you might disapprove of some of the `dark arts' that tabloid journalists use -- phone hacking, for instance -- but if they always played by the rules they'd rarely get the scoop. Some of these stories are trivial and hardly of vital national importance, but others are not. Without the unscrupulous, appalling, `shocking' behaviour of red-top reporters, we probably wouldn't know about Cecil Parkinson's infidelity or John Prescott's affair with his secretary. We wouldn't know about the match-fixing antics of Pakistani cricketers or the corruption at the heart of Fifa. Yes, the ink-stained wretches regularly desecrate the graves of dead girls, but they also speak truth to power and they do it more often -- and with more impact -- than the broadsheets.

So the defence is that tabloids uncover the private lives of politicians - I forget how either of those affairs were relevant to their performance as politicians - and corruption in sports, which is so terribly important. Truth to Power, baby.


So by all means condemn the News of the World for its newsroom culture, a culture that encouraged reporters to think it was acceptable to leave no stone unturned in pursuit of an `exclusive'. But before you get up on your high horse, remember that without these Fleet Street foot soldiers Britain would be a more corrupt country in which the ruling class could engage in all sorts of nefarious practices with no fear of being caught. Without its tabloid newspapers, Britain would be France.

Is that all it would take? Kill the tabloids? I have a new plan ...
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Jul 7th, 2011 at 03:17:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Without its tabloid newspapers, Britain would be France.

...because France has no tabloids...

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Thu Jul 7th, 2011 at 03:36:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Comparable to British in readership, influence, and trashiness, no.

What I like is this:

corrupt country in which the ruling class could engage in all sorts of nefarious practices with no fear of being caught

France, of course. While the British ruling class...

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Jul 7th, 2011 at 06:03:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You'd think it would take at least a few berets and some garlic to turn Britain into France, but no, just kill the tabloids.

Maybe the tabloids are bravely holding a flood of garlic and questionable headgear from engulfing the country.

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Jul 7th, 2011 at 06:11:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
without these Fleet Street foot soldiers Britain would be a more corrupt country in which the ruling class could engage in all sorts of nefarious practices with no fear of being caught. Without its tabloid newspapers, Britain would be France.

I am so relieved to learn what has protected Britain from corruption for so long. And I wonder if The Spectator's sarcasm might have been the thickest.

There certainly seems to have been significant effort devoted to preventing these "foot soldiers" from being found out for the use of their "dark arts". Perhaps both paparatzi and tabloid jouranalists should be required to dress in Beefeater costumes.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Jul 7th, 2011 at 10:12:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
What I find shocking is the length authorities went to cover it up.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Jul 7th, 2011 at 03:35:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
We're not surprised they do terrible things - although there's some surprise about just how terrible some of those things are.

We're more surprised by the extent to which they've been allowed to do terrible things.

Not that Beaverbrook and Hirst were any better. But that was a while ago, wasn't it?

Say Wiki:

In the Mogulize Your Business system, author and creator Damian Skinner defines a Mogul as someone who creates and controls a customer's funnel of experience through three primary points of control: perception, touch points, and exposure.

It's not even about the hacking: it's about the social control. The hacking is just a symptom.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Jul 7th, 2011 at 06:14:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Jul 7th, 2011 at 04:09:47 AM EST
And... NOTW to close on Sunday.

Presumably so the far more dangerous BSkyB deal can go through.

Cameron saying it was nothing to do with No 10. (Well, duh.)

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Jul 7th, 2011 at 12:06:34 PM EST
To be followed by the launch of the Sunday Sun...
by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Thu Jul 7th, 2011 at 12:13:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Officially that's still a "no comment."

But very probably, yes.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Jul 7th, 2011 at 12:18:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
News of the World to publish final edition this Sunday | Media news | Journalism.co.uk
A spokesperson for the National Union of Journalists told Journalism.co.uk this afternoon that it understood all 200 staff at the tabloid were going to be fired.

NUJ general secretary Michelle Stanistreet said in a separate statement: "Closing the title and sacking over 200 staff in the UK and Ireland, and putting scores more freelances and casuals out of a job, is an act of utter cynical opportunism."


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Jul 7th, 2011 at 01:24:59 PM EST
NUJ general secretary Michelle Stanistreet said in a separate statement: "Closing the title and sacking over 200 staff in the UK and Ireland, and putting scores more freelances and casuals out of a job, is an act of utter cynical opportunism."

Um, why?

I mean, I understand the whole "standing up for your members" thing. But they were willing to work at a wretched hive of scum and villainy like a Murdoch tabloid. I'm not sure sympathy is wholly appropriate here.

- Jake

Austerity can only be implemented in the shadow of a concentration camp.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Thu Jul 7th, 2011 at 08:48:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Neal Mann (fieldproducer) on Twitter
Source: News Of the World journalists told in staff meeting that Rebecca brooks offered her resignation last night #NOTW

(1) Neal Mann (fieldproducer) on Twitter

Source tells me News Of The World journalists were told Rebecca Brooks offered her resignation twice and she was turned down both times

(1) Neal Mann (fieldproducer) on Twitter

I'm told all journalists at the News of the World cheered when a staff member said they would accept her resignation #NOTW


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Jul 7th, 2011 at 01:53:08 PM EST
Neal Mann (fieldproducer) on Twitter
fieldproducer Neal Mann News of the World journalist tells me internet access is currently blocked at their site, says Twitter blocked since announcement


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Jul 7th, 2011 at 01:56:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That's why they're all being fired...

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jul 8th, 2011 at 02:27:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Deciphered- News of the World closure announcement | Media | guardian.co.uk
We go through James Murdoch's statement to staff announcing the closure of the 168-year-old Sunday paper, line by line


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Jul 7th, 2011 at 02:00:38 PM EST
Channel 4 has recorded Glen Mulcaire saying he was hired to hack "By Committee" and the Guardian has said that Coulson will be arrested Tomorrow.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Jul 7th, 2011 at 02:49:30 PM EST
Name that committee !!

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Jul 7th, 2011 at 03:57:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I was cooking while it was on and  there was a legal reply afterwards I didn't catch wether it was from NI's lawyers or Mulcaires, that said that it didn't imply any organised comittee, just that there wasn't only one.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Jul 7th, 2011 at 04:07:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Channel 4 News (channel4news) on Twitter
Actress Leslie Ash talks to @jonsnowC4 about the "comprehensive hack" on her family - she says even her children's mobiles were targeted.

Channel 4 News (channel4news) on Twitter

Leslie Ash: I think [the police] have let me down terribly. And if you can't trust the police, who can you trust? #hackgate #c4news

Described a process where her entire families phones were trawled by NOTW then said her lawyer was contacting Daily Mail to explain certain things they found out from the evidence of hacking.

Looks like its spreading

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Jul 7th, 2011 at 02:56:53 PM EST
All of the tabloids are pus-buckets and the scum who write them deserve the most vile sewer scrapings to be dumped on them.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Jul 7th, 2011 at 03:57:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Now theres that saying "be nice to people on the way up, as you'll meet them on the way down" it appears some people are beginning to realise that the opportunity is there.

George Michael (georgemichael) on Twitter

Hey boyz and girls, a message to my english fans in particular. Today is a fantastic day for Britain.

George Michael (georgemichael) on Twitter

Those of you that have wondered why I have had nothing to say this week about Rupert Murdoch, all i can say is that the time will come.

George Michael (georgemichael) on Twitter

But this much is worth saying now.

George Michael (georgemichael) on Twitter

Rebekah Brooks sat two feet from me in my own home and told me that it was never the public that came to them with information.....

George Michael (georgemichael) on Twitter

on celebrities, and that the Police always got there first. I think thats enough to be going on with. (Don't ask me how she got there)..

George Michael (georgemichael) on Twitter

Believe me I didnt invite her.

George Michael (georgemichael) on Twitter

Rebekah, glad to help :) how does it feel?


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Jul 7th, 2011 at 09:00:53 PM EST
Sounds like he's been smoking the herbal cigarettes again

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Jul 8th, 2011 at 11:50:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
@fieldproducer: News of the World source Rebekah Brooks meeting all #NOTW staff at 1600

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Jul 8th, 2011 at 09:39:02 AM EST
BBS/Peston: Ofcom to rule on News Corp's 'fitness' to own BSkyB

This is very interesting, because it's going to be very hard for Ofcom to break ranks and rule in favour of NI without causing a media storm.

And if they rule against Murdoch, NI's stock price is going to tank, and his aura of relative infallibility is going to be destroyed.

As one of yesterday's headlines said: "Sky falls in on Murdoch."

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Fri Jul 8th, 2011 at 10:39:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
They've apparently requested evidence from the current met investigastion, I don't see how they can't declare the org not fit and proper.

NOTW is £90 million a year profit out of the country. and if the sky ownership fails as he isn't fit and proper, then does he have to sell the other 40% he owns.

On top of that a not fit and proper person ruling anywhere in the world means a ten year ban from media ownership in China.

The Sky is really falling in....

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Jul 8th, 2011 at 12:01:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
how they can declare, not how they can not declare

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Jul 8th, 2011 at 12:07:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Robert Peston has noticed that "Although Andy Coulson resigned No.10 in Jan, his Conservative Party & No.10 email accounts still seemed live this morning. Curious"

In other news Ladbrookes have apparently suspended betting on David Cameron being the next person to leave the cabinet, last night he was apparently at 100/1. now these things dont necessarily go together but, it makes you think....

Agh Scarily they have Boris in as Favourite to replace him as party leader!

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Jul 8th, 2011 at 12:02:51 PM EST
...David Cameron being the next person to leave the cabinet ...

Only if he is pushed.  

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Fri Jul 8th, 2011 at 12:24:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Leaked! Rebekah Brooks angrily questioned by NotW staff | Liberal Conspiracy
Courtesy of someone at Sky News, we've managed to get the audio of angry NotW staff accusing Rebekah Brooks "of calling our newspaper toxic"... and "making the whole News International toxic".


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Jul 8th, 2011 at 01:36:06 PM EST
BBC reporting she's "no longer in charge of the internal investigation at News Int."
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Fri Jul 8th, 2011 at 02:01:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Theres a suggestion that two US lawyers have been moved in to head the response, which may mean that it is spread beyond the UK

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Jul 8th, 2011 at 04:29:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Apparently they're potentially facing some pretty hefty fines from US regulators.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sat Jul 9th, 2011 at 09:17:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
LOL, the irony. Of course both are toxic, but not only in the sense Brooks meant...

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Jul 8th, 2011 at 02:17:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]


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