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Desert Island Discs - Helen's distortions

by Helen Tue Jan 31st, 2012 at 12:05:38 PM EST

For those unfamiliar with the radio show, DID is a radio institution which has been running for 70 years and each week the invited "castaway" is asked to nominate the 8 pieces of music, a book and luxury which they would choose to accompany them to a desert island. You also get the Bible and the complete works of Shakespeare.

So, I wondered if we might extend this venerable institution to ET. Whenever anyone feels the urge they can nominate the tracks of their years, put together a blurb on why they matter and so on. The only thing I can suggest is in comments can we try to stay on the subject of the author's choices and put their own in their own diary

So, here's mine. The narrative could have been very messy, so many choices, so many options. I wrote down a few dozen tracks I could have chosen, and even then I was leaving out so many others. Yet, once I decided I'd just mark the ones that had to be in, I found that the selection of eight had made itself.


I came late to music, I had two elder sisters who were both into the pop music of the time, particularly the Beatles and, being a trans person who was desperate to try to avoid being seen to do anything associated with femininity, decided that this pop thing was a girl thing and so wasn't for me. It wasn't till I was 13 when something utterly irresistible broke down the barriers I'd erected. I was just blown away by the sonic strangeness, the excitement of what was coming out of the radio. Whatever this world was they came from, I wanted to live there.....

I would come home from school and burn out the frustrations of the day just playing the song over and over and over again, freaking out in my rather formless 13 year old way. Six or seven repetitions of it and I was ready to face the world again. I don't think I'd have made it out of my early teenage sane without that record.

Not long after this I went to a friend's house and he boasted of this record he'd just bought which he said was unintelligible nonsense. So, to show off just how bad it was he played it: but it wasn't nonsense at all, it was quite frankly the most exciting thing I'd ever heard. And it probably still is. It was the Faust Tapes, a promotional record collage of out-takes from a german experimental band called Faust. It blew my mind then. It still does.

Having decided I rather like these german experimental bands, the next thing I acquired was "Limited Edition" by Can. Which led to their album "Soon Over Babaluma" and the track which displaced Silver Machine as my sanity clause, a phenomenon I explored in this diary. Still cures all known ills as far as I'm concerned.

Don't think for a minute that I just like strange noisy stuff, I was listening to Yes, Genesis and Emerson Lake and Palmer as well. But in 75 I went to see the mightiest of them all. Led Zeppelin live at Earls Court. Believe me folks, everything you heard is true, they were the best. Accept no substitutes. Oddly I hadn't heard anything much by them beforehand, I think just Led Zep II so I was aware of Whole Lotta Love, but that was about it.  

Which meant that I went out to buy all their albums and since then the first, the bluesiest, has remained my favourite. It has an ambiance about it as if recorded in an urban basement with the sound of the traffic outside permeating every track as background hum. It sounds urgent, it makes you listen. And, of course this is the best track. I don't care that Pagey ripped it off from some guy, this is the real deal.

This next track, the Carrier from David Byrne/Brian Eno, is important to me because, as I've mentioned before, it's the one that put into my head the idea that I should learn to bellydance, a decision which became a saga in itself. I used to attend a rock disco at that time in Manchester and took this down one day. A friend suggested that, watching me "dance" to it, I should learn to bellydance. Laughably, once I had learned how to dance (sort of - I was never any good) I realised that this is a rubbish track for bellydancing. But never mind, any first step to adventure is a good one.

I don't know anything about My Bloody Valentine, I don't want to know anything, I don't need to. This is from the only single by them I have ever heard, a throwaway 4th track on an EP. I heard it by accident once when it was played on the radio when I was driving home from my parents, back in the days before boy/girl bands/RnB when pop music wasn't utterly hateful. I doubt it was the song from the EP the DJ meant to play, I just doubt he know any better.

I nearly crashed the car. Listening to this now I still don't know how I didn't, cos this is transcendent. To Here Knows When.

The final two songs are all wrapped up in the time when I was transitioning from male to female. As you can imagine, it's an emotional decision, a very uncertain time full of fears and hidden skeletons which pop out and accost you. Having braved all that I was distraught when, early on, I developed a severe allergic reaction to one of the hormones I was given and, for a few weeks it looked as if transitioning might not be possible.

These two songs sum up how I felt at the time and I cannot listen to either of them without remembering the emotions of the time.

Unusually for me, it's the lyrics which matter. My hearing doesn't distinguish well enough for me to hear lyrics easily. So other aspects are more important, the shapes the sounds make in my head and the way they flow together to show how the music is. I can be utterly lost in that. So, when lyrics matter, invariably something in my life has gone wrong.  

The first, from the Blue Nile, is "Over the Hillside" from Hats. The final verse is the killer;-

I can't go on and I can't go back
I don't feel so, matter of fact
I tried and tried to make good sense
What's the good to try it all again?

I couldn't progress my transition, but I couldn't bear returning to the wrongness in my head that was masculinity. I'd always had that, after all, I'd lived with it all my life  and felt "comfortable" with it, but once female hormones had eased that ache and shown me there was another way, I couldn't return. I was trapped. That lyric sums up that feeling.

This next song, Paper Wings by Gillian Welch, expresses the disappointment I was feeling. I thought I'd had happiness in my hands and I felt it was suddenly slipping through my fingers.

Paper wings, all torn and bent
But you made me feel that they were heaven sent
Paper wings, not real at all
But they took me high enough to really fall

Luckily, it was only a temporary halt and a slight change of medication. The continued supply of which would be my luxury.

As for a book, I read a lot, but rarely the same book twice. So a damn good history of the world would be good.

and as a band once said, This is my truth, now show my yours

Display:
Two ways to go - I'm undecided.

Either choose the 8 most difficult and complex music of any kind and culture, knowing that I would have plenty of time to get into them. Or the tracks that were running through my head during the most bewildering time in my life 15 - 28. Sex drugs and rock and roll. i.e. chosen for their maximum memory embellishing qualities. It's a fairly easy list to make, but personal.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Tue Jan 31st, 2012 at 01:47:00 PM EST
which list has the best tales.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Jan 31st, 2012 at 02:33:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I've no idea. But one lot would mean old tales retold and the other would mean new tales.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Tue Jan 31st, 2012 at 03:23:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Now the DID website have all of the guest's shows up on the website and I listened to Brian Eno's choices. He said a very similar thing, that if this were a real choice he'd select all of those music he'd found too challenging or couldn't get into so that he could devote the time to worming his way in.

But declined to do that for the programme as it would make for poor radio and instead chose the tracks of his years. I suspect he made the right choice and commend it to you

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Feb 1st, 2012 at 03:52:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh, we have to please other people now, do we? ;-)

Rock Island Line: Lonnie Donegan
Leader of the pack: Shangri-las
Anything from Kind of Blue: Miles Davis
Wade in the water: Graham Bond Organization
See my friend: Kinks
Good vibrations: Beach Boys
All around my hat: Steeleye Span
Give blood: Townshend

Obviously chosen from the thousands of alternatives that a radio audience might connect with, because they have a personal significance. Steeleye might seem out of character for Triloqvist, but the soundtrack of one's first acid experience comes to transcend musical taste. When you've seen the vibrations of instruments moving through the air, and witnessed the sculptural flow of breath from mouth and wind instrument, or experienced the dynamics of moving smoke and aroma, almost any musical genre is revealed as a thing of beauty and wonder.


You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Feb 1st, 2012 at 11:30:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
oh now thats an interesting soundtrack to start a ride on that particular chemical rollercoaster

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Feb 1st, 2012 at 12:20:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh, it was.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Feb 1st, 2012 at 01:22:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
cant be something too amusing personally, people laughing at my mad giggling in such a situation have been known to strain things after the first half hour.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Feb 1st, 2012 at 01:32:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The idea is for you to diarize so that you can supply a short anecdotes around the choice.

The Steeleye span story multiplied by eight would be good reading

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Feb 2nd, 2012 at 02:48:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
How I despise evolving briefs! Which is why any agreement I sign with a client, which lists a price for my services on a particular project, includes the words "Any additions, amendments or deviations from the written brief on which this offer is based will be charged pro rata."

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Feb 2nd, 2012 at 03:48:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Not even in the fine print;-

Whenever anyone feels the urge they can nominate the tracks of their years, put together a blurb on why they matter and so on.



keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Feb 2nd, 2012 at 08:29:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Actually, thinking about it, my book would be a survival DIY book and the luxury would be a very comprehensive tool kit

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Feb 1st, 2012 at 03:49:49 AM EST
My luxury would be an appropriately sized yacht. And the book something about DIY navigation...
by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Wed Feb 1st, 2012 at 06:16:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm pretty sure there's something in the fine print preventing yachts and deep space communicators

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Feb 2nd, 2012 at 03:01:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Ok then...

8 pieces of music, stepping around the Eno point that if you were truly stuck you'd be choosing things longer and more complex in order to make good use of all that time...

1) Raga Desh - Imrat Khan - 1989 Proms - Royal Albert Hall
(God knows, desert island or not, I'd kill to be able to force the BBC to make this recording available.) It's hard to describe how amazing this performance was. Magical. And it's the perfect expression of an alternative system of music - this is why when my contemporaries of a certain stripe were thrilled by "Godel, Escher, Bach" & notably by Bach's patterns, I found those patterns cold and largely unsatisfying.

  1. Buleria con Ricardo - Anoushka Shankar - Indian Classical sitar fused the Flamenco Piano - in some ways this is the music that my life should symbolically approach - a fusion of cultures.

  2. Mood Indigo - Duke Ellington - from the Indigos album. Hard to pick just one from this CD, but if it has to be one, it's the one that drew me into buying the CD in the first place - ask me another day and I might choose Willow Weep for Me instead... but then that raises the spectre of McCoy Tyner's version...

  3. Drinking in LA - Bran Van 3000 - and perhaps the luxury would be a sound system that can truly recreate the amazing soundscape buried in this song. Of course it's also the story of my generation post the end of the Cold War, just slightly lost, not always suffering (although sometimes) but always slightly lacking direction. On that theme, I could have chosen Hammer to Fall by Queen. "We who grew up tall and proud, in the shadow of the mushroom cloud." We survived the predicted end of the world, we grew up expecting to be drafted into the resistance forces, planting IEDs and sniping against Russian occupying forces. Or maybe just blasted to atoms under a mushroom cloud. But now we're older as I said in entry 4, just a little lost. But 8 is a small number, so it didn't get chosen.

  4. Rachmaninov Piano Concerto No. 2 - A number of instruments create noises that just activate my brain - sitar is one, but the piano is another and the piano is the one I learned to play (a bit.) Hard to choose just one piece out of the canon, but this one has soul.

  5. These are the Days - Jamie Cullum. Hard to make a case that this is really special in any particular way, but it's linked with a particular period of my life and the loves and losses and ups and downs very intimately, so I can't leave it out.

  6. Tunnel of Love - Dire Straits - Music from the teenage years of my life, heavy with memories - and as Douglas Adams noted, the only thing that competes with the sight of a Fuolornis Fire Dragons in the atmosphere stakes is Mark Knopfler working a guitar and rasping along.

  7. Tubthumping - Chumbawumba - This came into my listening orbit when I was living in the USA. It instantly reminded me of the social dimension of music, the accents are those of a Yorkshire sing-along. I'm sure you could find other better examples, but this is the one that is part of my life.

There's a million omissions, but that's 8 for today.

I'd like to exchange the Bible for something else. Years of Rice and Salt if allowed, or perhaps more permissibly, the Mahabharata.

A single book... that's hard. In fact for now the title eludes me.

Luxury - really hard to choose between: some kind of luxury food or luxury drink and a pen and paper.

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Fri Feb 3rd, 2012 at 10:34:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
you can do this as a diary y'know, flesh it out with a few youtubes

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Feb 3rd, 2012 at 11:38:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I may do, this was a place holder I had time to type out, but no proper internet to do linking and searching.

But also, I doubt it's that interesting to others, feels more like a little personal memory ramble...

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Fri Feb 3rd, 2012 at 01:54:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
hey no one's interested in my crap either, I put it out there to hang everything together.

The conversation didn't turn out as I hoped, it was more interesting than that

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Feb 3rd, 2012 at 02:04:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Not true. Always more interesting with a little commentary to go along.
by sgr2 on Sat Feb 4th, 2012 at 02:00:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, would be interesting! Please do, if possible. :-)
by sgr2 on Sat Feb 4th, 2012 at 01:59:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
1) Raga Desh - Imrat Khan - 1989 Proms : Do you mean this recording? Found it via Google, directed me to this forum.

Schengen is toast!
by epochepoque on Fri Feb 3rd, 2012 at 05:26:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
'took me high enough to really fall.'  Love that.

I'm not sure I've ever heard any of these songs. Gonna go through them now to see which ones will play in Germany (there's the rub.)

Super diary. I love being introduced to new things.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher

by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Wed Feb 1st, 2012 at 06:02:31 AM EST
Well, I can see why Gillian gets along with Emmylou Harris! Lovely song.

Only others I could get to play (on YouTube, though) were Led Zeppelin, which was not new to me, and Faust, which absolutely was. I confess I didn't have your same reaction to it, but think I should give it another chance after a few glasses (okay, bottles) of wine.

Bring a mix cd to the meetup or to Germany and perhaps there will be an opportunity to explore it, eh?

Thanks again for this diary.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher

by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Wed Feb 1st, 2012 at 06:14:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The Faust is a series of excerpts.

I imagine it in the sense that every 30 seconds or so I am being shown another stunning vista across an endless landscape of musical possibility and invention while being told "this, too, can be yours". Then

Scene change:

And we do it again...and again....and again.

My mind fills up with the excitement of it all. I don't doubt that few others see it that way else it would have been one of the most cited albums of all time. But I'm odd like that, I like Lou Reed's metal Machine Music, I get what he meant. I think that puts me in a fairly exclusive club.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Feb 3rd, 2012 at 11:46:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I would split my music between Beethoven and a some Russians.

A few symphonies, 5 & 6 at least.
Archduke trio.
All the piano concertos--can I get away with that?
Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto 3.
Tchaikovsky violin concerto.
Prokofiev piano sonata 7...
Etc.

This sort of stuff that is a.) complex enough to keep you entertained long after "She Does It Right" gets boring, and b.) the whole reason that big speakers and powerful amplifiers were invented.

by asdf on Wed Feb 1st, 2012 at 12:36:24 PM EST
Also, can I trade in my Bible for something useful?
by asdf on Wed Feb 1st, 2012 at 12:42:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
but they mostly have pages the thickness of rolling papers, it could have some practical use depending on the local flora

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Feb 1st, 2012 at 12:59:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I believe the Bible has been very useful in the past among the incarcerated community.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Feb 1st, 2012 at 01:24:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
it was from talking to people who have such pasts that had me thinking that way.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Feb 1st, 2012 at 01:30:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yeah, probably because they're without hope and perhaps not very well read to start with. If I'm going to be stuck somewhere for the duration, the reading matter needs to be pretty robust. Feynman's lectures would be good as a start. Or some classic literature of some variety...

2000 year old folk stories don't interest me that much...

by asdf on Wed Feb 1st, 2012 at 01:43:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You misunderstand. The usefulness of the Bible in prisons is confined to the use of its thin pages to roll and smoke snout and other weeds. Sometimes even the mattress stuffing - when desperate.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Feb 1st, 2012 at 01:50:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Maybe, although what I have heard from pipe smokers is that the paper is what messes up the flavor of whatever it is you're smoking... Is there going to be something on this island that I can make a pipe out of ???
by asdf on Wed Feb 1st, 2012 at 01:44:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Except for tropical islands, sure.



"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Wed Feb 1st, 2012 at 01:57:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well if you aren't taking the arctic route, then root vegetables are an implement of choice for the desperate smoke consumer

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Feb 1st, 2012 at 03:03:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Beautiful heartfelt diary, Helen. Surely one of your best since I've arrived at ET. Thanks for sharing your story.

And I think your idea of 'desert island discs" as a diary topic is great fun. I'm just having a hard time whittling my list down to just 8 pieces. It's hard. I have tunes that have defined periods in my life and tell a story, but they may not be the exact same ones I'd like to take along to a desert island today.

I had to laugh. When I was trying to think of songs and defining moments I was reminded about my first feelings of passion, which came about while dancing my first slow song with a boy at a 5th grade sock hop to this tune. It was a defining experience all right, feelings of jealousy and all that jazz ... still dig the song, but it won't be making the list.

by sgr2 on Wed Feb 1st, 2012 at 04:51:49 PM EST
Were you here when RG did his sound diary series? (unfortunately a lot of the videos are now extict, but theres enough information on them to go out and find the tunes through youtube) all in all there are about ten diaries if I remember right with people throwing bits of music out there to discuss

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Feb 3rd, 2012 at 07:00:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Wasn't around then, but I bet I would have enjoyed it if I had been.
by sgr2 on Sat Feb 4th, 2012 at 02:04:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
http://www.eurotrib.com/story/2008/3/19/82721/8798

heres the first one from the archives

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 08:07:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I concur with asdf. Prokofiev's sonata No7 (the middle one of the war sonatas) is probably THE piece of piano music of the 20th century. Especially in the hands of Pollini:

I first encountered this piece in my teenage years when everything seemed easy and the grey clouds hadn't appeared yet. At first it was a 'jazzy' delight. Now it's a plunge into the cold water of life but its passion can still comfort.

For more dulcet tones I recommend Wagner - Tristan&Isolde, Carlos Kleiber 1976 live in Bayreuth. Music at the boiling point:

The complete live recording of that legendary performance is available for free: Act I, Act II, Act III. Also, an earlier recording of the Liebestod orchestral version in better audio quality by Kleiber. I used to think of Wagner as pop music but beauty, even oversweetened, is important.

Other favourites: Sokolov plays Komitas. Irreversible loss. It's visible but is it fading?

Furtwängler conducts Bruckner symphony No9. My favourite symphony. Recorded October 1944. I try not to listen to it too often. Total horror and dreams of deliverance right next to each other. This is a symphony about dying. Listen to the trumpets scream at the end of the first movement.

Schengen is toast!

by epochepoque on Thu Feb 2nd, 2012 at 02:54:52 AM EST
The better half has bought one of these pad thingies (without the i-, thankfully) so i've been looking things up, and reluctantly concluding that we now need some blueteeth speakers (I'm a technophobe in private life, a late adopter. In composing this list, I've concluded i got this from my dad).

So here is my arbitrary eight, posted as replies to this post as time permits.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 01:13:24 PM EST

Earliest musical influences : sixties pop. A golden age. The song that marked me most, contemporaneously, was Tin Soldier. Then there was Itchykoo Park, which was a favorite among the stack of my eldest brother's singles, which I thrashed mercilessly around the turn of the decade. Afterglow was a later rediscovery, when I was into concept albums in the 70s (here, with its lovely intro,from the album). This song has stayed with me ever since.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 01:30:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Please do your own diary

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 01:42:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
listening to that another track was nagging at me, and after tugging at the thread for a bit it came in. The refrain seems to be similar to "All or nothing" by the same band.

No great shakes, just an observation

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 01:51:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The golden void speaks to me denying my reality
I lose my body, lose my mind, I blow like wind, flow like wine

Hawkwind is the band at the very top of my Last.fm list. In the period when Simon House, Nik Turner and Lemmy where in the band they ventured into places no man ever dared before. The name of my blog is an obvious tribute to that music that makes your mind fly. I also listen to a great deal of german rock, any record with Manuel Gottsching and Klaus Schulze together is an absolute must have. But there are many other interesting bands: Amon Dull II, Agitation Free, Tangerine Dream...

It would be hard for me to choose 8 LP, let alone 8 tracks. In a proper record each track is a single piece that adds up to the much more valuable whole.

Here's a song from 1975, one of the best of that time, that today seems to have acquired a special meaning:



You might find me At The Edge Of Time.

by Luis de Sousa (luis[dot]a[dot]de[dot]sousa[at]gmail[dot]com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 02:19:15 PM EST
Don't recognise it. Van der Graaf ?

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Feb 7th, 2012 at 11:38:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
:) It's ok you don't recognise them, even being there at the time. They made some of the best rock alba ever, but apart from a huge success in Italy, Van Der Graff Generator remained fairly underground elswhere.

You might find me At The Edge Of Time.
by Luis de Sousa (luis[dot]a[dot]de[dot]sousa[at]gmail[dot]com) on Fri Feb 10th, 2012 at 04:51:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No, tbh, I knew of them, I just didn't really care for them too much, as we say here, it didn't float my boat.

I remember a friend dragging me to a Peter Hamill concert, but I found it absolutely awful and so, 3/4 hr in, I decided to leave when I'd had enough. Trouble was, Hamill saw me and "politely" waited while I made my way past everyone (seated like in cinema) before continuing

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Feb 11th, 2012 at 07:41:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It took awhile to get through your list because all of the artists/music was new to me. Except Zeppelin, of course.

I found the Hawkwind piece to be instantly likeable. It's easy to see how you could let your frustrations out listening to that one.

The Faust piece was interesting because it had so many different layers and examined so much territory.

The third piece by Can couldn't be viewed.

Most anybody who likes rock likes Zeppelin, so of course I loved that!

The Carrier piece had an unusual array of instruments and nice vocals. To my ears it had a distinctive mid-eastern feel to it. It was easy to imagine bellydancing going on.

I agree about the lyrics on Over the Hillside. Very touching.

If I had to name a favorite though it would be Paper Wings. Now that's a real gem!

Thanks again for putting together a great diary Helen.

by sgr2 on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 02:51:54 PM EST
you're welcome

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Feb 7th, 2012 at 11:30:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Too much good music, too many experiences. The formative years, the hell-raising years, or the giving back years? There's way too much to deal with, but I suppose I'll start at the beginning.

Luxury item: my Swedish horse bed and hemp sheets
And yes, she said yes, I will yes ... take along my copy Ulysses.  

by sgr2 on Thu Feb 9th, 2012 at 05:56:11 AM EST


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