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Thursday Open Thread

by In Wales Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 01:02:21 PM EST

Because we're worth it!


Display:
So, what's new?
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 01:02:41 PM EST
"Yo mama!" no, wait "That's what she ..."
No none of these work. Can we reuse the one from yesterday?

"Is this an Open Thread?"
"... I see before me? The handle toward my hand."

Huh. It's longer than I thought to "And such an instrument I was to use."

-----
sapere aude

by Number 6 on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 01:21:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 01:37:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm not sure that isn't just a bit kinda derogatory to women...

I mean, guys have reporter jackets and stuff with lotsa pockets.

But I expect they know how to remain focused. As in, "I couldn't hear you over how this chick I met is hot".

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 03:22:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm just a fan of pockets.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 05:28:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
First thing I look for in a new coat.

The Castro look may be a pocket too far though.

-----
sapere aude

by Number 6 on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 06:01:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]
IBM Research Report RC24789 (W0904-093)

'Twas published on April 22, 2009 but it's new to me.


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 02:04:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
So where's the link?

</grrrrmbl>

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 03:18:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Lazy, lazy, lazy.

Here you go.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 03:21:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, I could make something of the first two pages. Over to you ;)
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 03:42:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Or IBM could have used stuff invented by the DOD.

According to artificial intelligence expert Frank Wofford, "Siri consists of three main components: a speech-to-text analyzer, a grammar analyzer, and a set of service providers."

According to an Xconomy article by Wade Roush, "the algorithms that make the app [Siri} work are the product of years of defense-sponsored research at Menlo Park, CA-based SRI International and other institutions that cost taxpayers at least $150 million.

Siri is a technology that has a foundation in decades of research conducted and supported by DARPA and SRI International's Artificial Intelligence Center through two programs: DARPA's Personalized Assistant that Learns (PAL), and SRI's Cognitive Agent that Learns and Organizes (CALO). SRI funded the initial Siri research conducted by Dag Kittlaus and his team of engineers.

PAL was an adaptive artificial intelligence project for data retrieval and synthesis. The goal of PAL was to use artificial intelligence to improve data gathering by noting how a user would conduct data retrieval and synthesis and improve the results for that user for subsequent data gathering.

The PAL program funded SRI's CALO project. According to SRI, the goal of the CALO project was to create cognitive software systems, systems that can reason, learn from experience, be told what to do, explain what they are doing, reflect on their experience, and respond robustly to surprise.

In 2008, SRI founded Siri Incorporated to commercialize the results of the CALO project, Silicon Valley venture capital firms Menlo Ventures and Morgenthaler Ventures poured another $24 million into the technology.


http://inventors.about.com/od/sstartinventions/a/Siri.htm
by asdf on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 04:33:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Towards the Open Advancement of Question Answering Systems
As opposed to away from the covert hindering of answer questioning chaos?

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 04:55:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
As opposed to the Hokey-Pokey:

in Greek.

I take it you lack experience with B2B White Papers.  This one ain't bad, as such things go.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 06:59:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A QA system is a software system that provides exact answers to natural language questions for some range of topics. The notion of exact in this context is ultimately a subjective measure intended to indicate that a QA system is distinguished by providing responses that contain just the information necessary to precisely answer the question intended by user. The QA system's exact answer may be supplemented with additional information, including a justification or dialog explaining why the provided answer is correct.
(emphasis in the original)

I'm wondering whether they are going to perorate on the difference between exact and accurate answers.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 05:02:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I like the idea of 'exact' being subjective,
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 06:17:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
In German, genau means exact, exactly. But the common phrase is ganz genau, or completely exact. Meaning there are degrees of exact?

Only in 'Schland.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - AnaÔs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 06:37:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
it means more like correct in that context

it can also mean accurate

German is like that -  words have many meanings which change with the context, and whose degree is adjusted with other words.  quite an interesting way of approaching a language

by stevesim on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 07:04:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
here is a good example:

Geist means

  •  mind
  •  ghost
  •  psyche
  •  apparition
  •  intellect, or
  •  wit

depending on the context
by stevesim on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 07:13:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
German is like that -  words have many meanings

You don't mean to say that German is unique in that?

Geist means

 mind
 ghost
 psyche
 apparition
 intellect, or
 wit

And how many meanings does the word spirit have in English?

mind
ghost
psyche
apparition
humor
liquor

and so on

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 07:51:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
ok that's not the best example but the comment still holds.  

whereas in French and English people have to struggle to learn new words, in German you have to learn the various usages of each word.  guessing a new word is easier in German as you can quickly understand how words are structured.

by stevesim on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 04:45:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
whereas in French and English people have to struggle to learn new words, in German you have to learn the various usages of each word

I still disagree that that's a difference between these languages.

guessing a new word is easier in German as you can quickly understand how words are structured

It depends. You need to be a relatively proficient German speaker already to be able to do that.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 05:25:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
being able to speak all three languages rather well and others in addition, I have to say that that is the biggest difference between German and other languages.  of course, there are some examples of one word being used to mean several different things in other languages, but not to the same extent as in German.

in fact, I remember reading something that Einstein had said, and people interpreting in English that he meant to use "Geist" as mind rather than spirit when writing about something, and that is why that example came to mind.

and one really does not have to be proficient to understand how German builds new words and how objects are designated by their function rather than by an obscure word that needs to be memorized.  

by stevesim on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 05:41:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
and one really does not have to be proficient to understand how German builds new words and how objects are designated by their function rather than by an obscure word that needs to be memorized.

Sure, but you said this makes it easy to guess the meaning of a new composite word, which is an entirely different thing and (at least to me) can be difficult even if you can decompose it into building blocks.

There are long series of verbs built from a various prepositions and a single stem verb, and the meaning is not necessarily obvious. Mastering the prepositional system of a language is among the hardest parts of learning a language (just like in English phrasal verbs are an 'advanced vocabulary' topic).

And the number of "obscure" stem words in German is still large enough that learning them is a difficulty, just like in English.

Are you a native German speaker, by the way?

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 05:54:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
here is a better example: Kugelschreiber which is a word that one learns rather early when learning German. And when one breaks it down into the component words, it is easy to understand and remember.

And that leads me to the word Kugel which in German can mean ball, bullet, sphere, orb, globe, etc

As for the verbs, yes they can be difficult but as one understands how they are formed from the stems, it becomes easier to understand the meaning of a new word without referring to a dictionary.  

Every language has its difficulties but learning new vocabulary I don't think is one of the problems with German.  

by stevesim on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 06:01:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
And that leads me to the word Kugel which in German can mean ball, bullet, sphere, orb, globe, etc

You're again not claiming that ball doesn't have multiple meanings such as sphere, drop, globe, pellet, orb, projectile, shot, dance, testicle...

Kugelschreiber is an easy one, assuming you have memorised the "obscure" stem word kugel.

Also, a large fraction of German composite words, especially composite verbs, are calques from Latin. So that kind of composition has to be as much of a difficulty when learning German as when learning Latin (or languages whose vocabulary is derived from Latin).

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 06:19:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I disagree.  Kugel is used quite often and is not obscure.  For example, a scoop of ice cream is also a Kugel so the use of the word becomes immediately apparent.

Then, the prefixes or suffixes ver, an, auf, ab, aus, er, be, um, etc also follow some type of rules that also become apparent with exposure so one can easily get the meaning of aussteigen, umsteigen, ansteigen if one understands the meaning of the verb steigen.

Although again, ansteigen means to climb aboard and to increase....

by stevesim on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 07:13:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
the prefixes or suffixes ver, an, auf, ab, aus, er, be, um, etc also follow some type of rules that also become apparent with exposure

That's where I said mastering the prepositional system of a language is among the hardest parts of learning a language. Exposure is not enough, generally. Immersion is needed.

Any language's verb tense system is actually an elaborate temporal model, and the prepositional system is an elaborate spatial model. The fun part is that each language's spatial and temporal systems are different in subtle ways. For instance, the Spanish en is used variously for the meanings of (at least) in on at. On the other hand, Spanish has more verb tenses in regular use than most European languages. This does not mean that a Spanish speaker does not understand the difference between in and on, just like speakers of other languages are not unable to express some of the temporal nuances of Spanish tenses. But turning such an understanding into an intuitive or automatic language sense is a different matter entirely.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 07:32:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
there's another aspect of prepositions in German that is far more difficult, and that is what I thought you were referring to.  there's a fixed preposition for each verb, for example, thinking about something or denken an etwas, or waiting for is warten auf.  these require memorisation.
by stevesim on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 07:38:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Again, as in Latin. And the case which each preposition demands also must be memorised. And some prepositions can take more than one case, which changes the meaning of the verb. But I was thinking of composites of preposition and verb, so not the fact that one says denken an but that nachdenken means 'to reflect' doesn't seem to follow from the fact that nach means 'after'. And it's nachdenken + über whereas it's denken an...

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 07:44:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
well, you see, I think nachdenken = reflect is self-evident
by stevesim on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 07:49:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
But is it evident that reflect must be <blank>denken?

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 07:52:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I do not understand your question
by stevesim on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 07:56:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Are you going from German to English or from English to German when you say it's evident that reflect = nachdenken?

In any case, reflect is composed from flex (= bend), so...

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 07:58:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't really think in languages but in concept since I grew up with many languages
by stevesim on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 08:01:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Then you may not be representative of what people learning English or German as foreign languages find difficult.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 08:05:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
we all learn differently based on our experiences and capabilities
by stevesim on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 08:10:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
the prefixes or suffixes ver, an, auf, ab, aus, er, be, um, etc also follow some type of rules that also become apparent with exposure

Interesting that you're mixing prepositions (an, auf, ab, aus, um) with particles that are not prepositions (ver, er, be).

Which is partly responsible for the separability or not of the verbs - (un)trennbare Verben -, and is in turn related to the English grammar concept of ending a sentence by a preposition. (The preposition by which I end the sentence, as opposed to the preposition which I end the sentence by)

That is one instance where I would object to the way grammar is taught in terms of form (whether verbs separate or not) which is to be memorised, rather than in terms of function (the particle is or is not a preposition). But then again, I'm a grammar wonk and don't subscribe to the "just talk, people will understand you even if you make mistakes" school of language teaching.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 09:47:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, it takes work to speak onewallfree German.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - AnaÔs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 10:19:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Does not what is easy and hard about a language primarily depend on what languages you already know?

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!
by A swedish kind of death on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 06:59:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
you remind me that I recently heard of the concept of sign language poetry.  Isn't that an interesting concept?
by stevesim on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 07:20:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
How about the fact that French and British sign languages are different, and that American sign language is descended from the French and not the English?

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 07:23:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
yes that is extremely interesting as well. I had thought that the advantage of sign language would be to be able to communicate across oral language barriers, but alas...
by stevesim on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 07:25:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
which emerged spontaneously among students at a school for the deaf, who weren't taught any other sign language and has evolved elaborate syntax and grammar...  

This speaks to the human brain's innate ability to generate language.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 09:34:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
No, sorry, not a chance. English is notorious for combinations of words that have little to do with the constituents.

Quickly, what does 'go' mean?

-----
sapere aude

by Number 6 on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 06:11:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
look at the word "Stift" in German

it can mean pen, pencil, monastery, nail, peg, pinion, post, etc.

English doesn't even compare.

by stevesim on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 06:15:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Eh.
Except for monastery, they are all nail-shaped. Simples.

-----
sapere aude
by Number 6 on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 07:08:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I obviously cannot convince you
by stevesim on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 07:20:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
No, I think it's potayto potatoh time.
Have fun!


-----
sapere aude
by Number 6 on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 07:38:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
and of course geist can mean liquor too.
by IM on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 11:54:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
In Germany, probably.
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 07:44:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
But it is.

My two favorite examples:

1.  Which of the following is correct:

a.)  1 + 1 = 1
b.)  1 + 1 = 2
c.)  1 + 1 = 10
d.)  1 + 1 = 20

Question B.  What fundamental finding was expressed by the equation e = mc^2?

Answers:

1.  All of them.  Answer a) is the deductive logic AND operation, b) is decimal arithmetic, c) is binary arithmetic, d) is decimal arithmetic where the "1's" are tens.

Question B.  The finding is ending of a proof of the Pythagorean Theorem done by Einstein when he was eight (IIRC.)  

Information is only exact in the context of an instance of communication.  Change, or morphing, the context changes, or morphs, the "exactness."

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 06:39:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm wondering whether they are going to perorate on the difference between exact and accurate answers.

Page 2, me boy:

A Question Answering (QA) system is a software system that provided exact answers to natural language questions for some range of topics.  the notion of exact, in this context is ultimately a subjective measure intended to indicate that a QA system is distinguished by providing responses that contain just the information necessary to precisely answer the question intended by the user.  The QA system's exact answer may be supplement with additional information, including a justification or dialog explaining why the provided answer is correct.

Another distinguishing and important characteristic of QA systems is that their accuracy and their ability to justify an answer should increase with the amount of relevant information provided in the question.  They should, therefore respond more accurately and more completely to longer, denser questions, that is, to questions which provide more information about what is being asked.  This behavior would suggest that QA systems rely on a deeper semantic "understanding" of the intent of the question.

IOW, no.

:-)

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 06:24:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Another distinguishing and important characteristic of QA systems is that their accuracy and their ability to justify an answer should increase with the amount of relevant information provided in the question.  They should, therefore respond more accurately and more completely to longer, denser questions, that is, to questions which provide more information about what is being asked.  This behavior would suggest that QA systems rely on a deeper semantic "understanding" of the intent of the question.

I saw that, and it had me puzzled. It is equally plausible that the more detailed the question, the shorter the answer needs to be.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 06:26:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You're right.  But, possibly, not for the reason(s) you think.  

The Hard Problem is: the detail of a question and the length of the needed answer have very little to do with each other.  "Do you have a pen?" and "How does a pen work?" are both five word questions but the length of the answers will be very different.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 06:50:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Interfax-Religion
Moscow, November 1, Interfax - The Russian Hydro-Meteorological Center does not see any unusual phenomena, which may signal the approaching Doomsday, Center Head Roman Vilfand told Interfax on Thursday.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 02:10:48 PM EST
Are they actively looking for signs of doomsday?
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 02:20:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
well only so far as the rest of the article goes

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 03:49:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I wonder what Nomad thinks about that one.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 02:21:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The science consensus does not currently support Doom, though we would be well advised to get our asses in gear just in case.

(But I have no business putting words in Nomad's mouth).

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 03:45:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The science consensus does not currently support Doom

But Castle Wolfenstein is okay?

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 05:00:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Depends on the hardware.
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 06:15:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Chapel Perilous



"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - AnaÔs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 06:44:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]


"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - AnaÔs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 06:55:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The Russian Hydro-Meteorological Center needs to give their green shoots a haircut to drive away all those lazy-assed bumblebees.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 02:37:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Proactively.

-----
sapere aude
by Number 6 on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 06:13:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh the importance of a comma.

</PN>

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 03:27:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You could have said
NP!

</PN>



I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 04:59:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Interfax-Religion
"The Russian Hydro-Meteorological Center forecasts a shorter daylight period rather than Apocalypses. The astronomical daylight time will be shrinking until December 22. There will be only seven hours of daylight by December 22-23, which is extremely little. There are no other signs of the approaching Doomsday," he said.

Something tells me there's been a serious pistake.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 03:52:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I have personally been wondering what happened to lead up to this press release ever since I first saw it

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 04:02:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Maybe you could try to email Roman Vilfand.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 04:57:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
to the Olde Musicke

(late 70s, early 80s, post punk or not.)

having finally succumbed to this Spotify gimmick.

What sparked this degenerate move, I think, was hearing the Gang of Four coming out of Younger Daughter's computer. I thought that odd, because I was pretty sure that I hadn't mentioned them to her (I occasionally throw the kids a bone : why don't you look up Brian Eno, for example). But no, she had found them all by herself. Damaged Goods. Gratifying. But vaguely disturbing too.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 03:58:06 PM EST
It's my  main use of Faceboil now, a group of former friends have a daily suggest three themes and find tunes to fit competition. peson who's tunes get the most likes  gets to set the next days themes, and count the scores

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 04:05:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The B side, "love like anthrax" is one of my favourite bits of guitar e v a h !!!

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 08:52:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]


keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 08:53:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Calif. restaurant acknowledges roach infestation

The Associated Press
Published: Wednesday, Oct. 31

MILL VALLEY, Calif. -- A Northern California eatery is giving its customers information that most restaurants go to great lengths to cover up.

Cafe del Soul in Marin County has posted a sign near its front door acknowledging that it's infested with German cockroaches.

http://www.sacbee.com/2012/10/31/4951558/calif-restaurant-acknowledges.html#storylink=misearch#story link=cpy

So you have Merkel and we have cockroaches. Who got the worse end of that deal? Any takers?

The good news ... it's only a life sentence. You eventually leave this planet of idiots.

by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 04:22:52 PM EST
http://www.democracynow.org/2012/11/1/a_crisis_foretold_studies_warned_new

I call it "Old hippie chick who doesn't understand who runs things." Starts at about the 7 minute mark.

The good news ... it's only a life sentence. You eventually leave this planet of idiots.

by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Nov 1st, 2012 at 05:00:32 PM EST
Ha, turn your phone off before going into the studio !!! Everybody's done it, but it's the greatest sin.

Every major seaside city in the world is vulnerable to climate change. The flatter it is the more vulnerable, especially if there was low lying marshland which has been used for expansion, eg London, Rotterdam, New Orleans, NYC come to mind immediately.


keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 09:05:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I get a malware warning when I allow javascripts on Democracy Now. Have they been infected with something?

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!
by A swedish kind of death on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 09:31:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Haven't seen the video but read the transcript. Looks like it could have done with editing.

The Onion: Actual Expert too boring for TV


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sapere aude

by Number 6 on Fri Nov 2nd, 2012 at 09:39:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]


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