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Monday Open Thread

by afew Mon Nov 12th, 2012 at 11:43:13 AM EST

New thread for old rope


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Don't expect any money.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Nov 12th, 2012 at 11:43:46 AM EST
Spent the entire weekend finishing an article to submit for publication.  No that I'm finished, I can correct a stack of papers (from two classes) and try to finish designing my online course, and... and... and...
and I can't wait until Christmas vacation!

"Beware of the man who does not talk, and the dog that does not bark." Cheyenne
by maracatu on Mon Nov 12th, 2012 at 11:50:30 AM EST
Tomorrow is the last day of actual classes at my uni. Semester is finished Friday after next.  Then I just have to get cracking on dissertation writing.

I've become enamored with the latest academic toy, Memrise.  It's a struggle to get my students to study, but I think that this thing has the potential to actually keep them engaged.  Maybe then we can actually spend the class discussing the reading instead of them writing down definitions rote from my lectures and regurgitating them whole on test.  I must be getting old, because it seems like the young ones these days don't understand that the point of learning is not to be able to repeat words for a test, but instead actually be able to apply concepts learned to their own life.


And I'll give my consent to any government that does not deny a man a living wage-Billy Bragg

by ManfromMiddletown (manfrommiddletown at lycos dot com) on Mon Nov 12th, 2012 at 03:51:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I must be getting old, because it seems like the young ones these days don't understand that the point of learning is not to be able to repeat words for a test, but instead actually be able to apply concepts learned to their own life.

It's a matter of perspective. When you were a young'un you didn't see all the young'uns but overwhelmingly those that, like yourself, were interested in learning and critical thinking. As an instructor, you're forced to come to terms with the entire student body.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Nov 12th, 2012 at 04:01:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
As an instructor, you're forced to come to terms with the entire student body.

Ok. Then just two words: terminal cancer.  

I caught a student plagiarizing from Wikipedia. I mean come on, have the respect for me to plagiarize from a respectable source.


And I'll give my consent to any government that does not deny a man a living wage-Billy Bragg

by ManfromMiddletown (manfrommiddletown at lycos dot com) on Mon Nov 12th, 2012 at 05:28:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I tried recently to explain to a university professor relative that in order to use Wikipedia correctly, you have to read both the regular Article page and also the Talk page. Often the Talk page tells you a lot more about what is really going on than the article itself does...

As an example, I showed her an article about the field in which she is a world-renowed expert. Under pressure, she read the Article and Talk pages, and then said something to the effect of "This is the biggest bunch of baloney I have ever read; obviously the so-called authors know nothing whatsoever of the subject; no way am I going to waste my time trying to set them straight; you get what you pay for with this Internet crap; why anybody wastes their time on this junk anyway is complete mystery to me."

by asdf on Tue Nov 13th, 2012 at 12:57:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
What's her field? Must be humanities/social sciences. The Science section of the wikipedia is decent.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2012 at 01:01:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Meaning:  if two people act the same way, it is not necessarily the same.

Apple klaut SBB-Uhr - Swisscom

Die Schweizer Bahnhofsuhr gefällt offenbar auch der Firma Apple: Der Computerhersteller brauchte das Design für ein Uhr-Icon im neuen iPad-Betriebssystem. Nun verlangt die SBB eine finanzielle Abgeltung.

Erst kürzlich gewann Apple einen Prozess gegen Konkurrenten Samsung, weil dieser Designelemente des iPhones kopiert hatte. Jetzt steht Apple selbst unter Beschuss.

«Zwar haben wir Freude, dass die Schweizer Bahnhofsuhr bei Apple zum Einsatz kommt. Das ist ein Beweis mehr dafür, dass sie ein echtes Designerstück ist», sagte SBB-Sprecher Christian Ginsig zu einem Bericht von «Blick am Abend» vom Donnerstag. Dabei handle es sich aber um eine unautorisierte Nutzung von Apple.

Die SBB sei die alleine Besitzerin der Marken- und Urheberrechte der Bahnhofsuhr, sagte Ginsig. Das Bahnunternehmen werde nun Kontakt zu Apple suchen. Angestrebt werde eine rechtliche und finanzielle Lösung.

Apple 'paid £13million to Swiss national rail operator' after using its iconic clock design without permission | Mail Online

  • Apple agreed to pay out lump sum to SBB in October after using the unique clock face design without first seeking permission
  • Size of the settlement was supposed to be confidential but Swiss paper leaked details, quoting several unnamed sources

Apple has reportedly dished out £13million to compensate Swiss national rail operator SBB for using its famous clock without permission.

The company agreed in October to pay a lump sum so it could continue using SBB's Swiss-designed station clock face on its iPads and iPhones.

The size of the settlement was supposed to have been kept confidential, but a Swiss paper leaked details on its website, quoting several unnamed sources.

 

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Nov 12th, 2012 at 12:04:43 PM EST
£13 million barely features on their accounts, chicken feed

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Nov 12th, 2012 at 12:51:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
They were quite happy to get away without paying even that, it seems?

The good thing about this is that a great and powerful of the "enforcing our intellectual property" party is publicly shown not to give a damn about anyone else's.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2012 at 01:47:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
THAT's an iconic clockface? Is it the red dot on the second hand that makes it so? I can't think of that clock face as anything but perfectly generic, except for the red dot.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2012 at 04:03:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well... what is a rectangle with rounded corners?
by Katrin on Tue Nov 13th, 2012 at 04:25:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That's what makes it iconic, I think: it's the prototype for what you think of as a generic clock face.

Which makes the licensing misstep slightly weird. Either no one at Apple got the reference, which would be strange, or they didn't care, which is possible, or it never occurred to them to ask legal if they needed to license  a design from 1944 that had become generic, which is probably most likely.

Oh wait, APPLE EVVVILLLLLLLL. <sigh>

(I mean, they are, they're a corporation, but not unusually so.)

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2012 at 05:33:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
On maybe they think that copyright laws don't apply in Switzerland?
A Swiss photographer has filed suit against Apple in a US District Court in New York, alleging that Cupertino's marketeers used one of her photos without her permission in its MacBook Pro with Retina Display flack attack.

"Despite representing that it did not intend to use the photo and knowing that it had not obtained a license," the lawsuit, filed this Wednesday, claims, "Apple proceeded to copy, publish, and exploit Plaintiff's 'Eye Closeup' photograph, including in its MacBook Pro advertising campaign, keynote address, and related advertising materials without permission or compensation."

by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2012 at 05:37:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Wouldn't that have been the ad agency?

What's really fun is

a) That minor crap like that is news because APPPPPLLLLLLLE, despite what disdain the cool kids hold Apple in. Apple bingo.

b) That people who know perfectly well that, as a rule, the media don't know which end of their body the shit comes out of assume that every  negative word written about groups and companies they dislike is correct.

c) The extent to which the tech press demonstrate how full of shit the media is. It's a microcosm of wrongness and cluelessness, despite how small and relatively easy the universe in question is to cover. Imagine how much more wrong and full of crap they are when they have to deal with complicated things in the real world.

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2012 at 05:52:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
What's really really fun is that this craphole of an intellectual property legal world we live in puts money in the wrong hands, hampers creativity, blocks new products, and is morally ridiculous.
by asdf on Tue Nov 13th, 2012 at 01:00:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
How is it different from this one? Can the DB sue as well?

by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2012 at 04:40:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Who did it first, the Germans or the Swiss? More lawsuits in perspective...
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2012 at 04:47:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Schweizer Bahnhofsuhr avanciert zu Kult-Anwendung - Swisscom
«Die Popularität liegt mit Sicherheit am zeitlosen Design» meint der App-Entwickler und verweist auf das 1944 von Hans Hilfiker für die Schweizer Bundesbahnen (SBB) entworfene Konzept, das zum Vorbild wurde für Bahnhofsuhren in ganz Europa.

It seems to have been a Swiss who designed it. I read somewhere, but can't find it again, that the DB payed for the use of the design. Besides the DB clock is not identical, the 3rd finger has a ring instead of a dot.

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2012 at 05:17:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I didn't think it had to be an exact copy to be a copyright violation.
by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2012 at 05:20:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]

Not quite the same.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2012 at 04:51:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]
by Katrin on Mon Nov 12th, 2012 at 12:31:22 PM EST
Saw this yesterday, didn't have a chance to post, Danke Katrin.

Here's the version in english.



"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Mon Nov 12th, 2012 at 01:04:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
One thing I definitely got wrong.  Four years ago, I said on dKos that the stimulus might was the most important act of Obama's first term, and that failing to pass a sufficiently large stimulus bill might well cost Obama re-election.

Turned out the stimulus wasn't the most important thing.  Nor was it health care or the war or bin Laden or whatever.

It was saving Chrysler.  Which I was iffy on, because while I thought GM could be turned around, Chrysler was probably dead anyway.

Well, reading the county-level results, it turns out that the key to Ohio last Tuesday wasn't Coal Country or the kids in Columbus or black folks in Cleveland.  It was winning NW Ohio -- Toledo and the surrounding areas.

Home of Jeep.

Ol' Mittens picked a really dumb thing to lie about.

(h/t Mig for the pic)

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Mon Nov 12th, 2012 at 12:34:59 PM EST
Did it help anywhere else? He would have won even without Ohio.
by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Mon Nov 12th, 2012 at 12:49:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]


paul spencer
by paul spencer (spencerinthegorge AT yahoo DOT com) on Mon Nov 12th, 2012 at 12:52:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, I think the economic impact from Chrysler collapsing might have cost him a lot more than just Ohio around the Rust Belt.

He might still have won the western states.  Certainly New Mexico looks pretty solidly blue.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Mon Nov 12th, 2012 at 12:52:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
GOP turned NM solidly blue with their anti-Brown People, anti-immigrant, hate and hysteria.  Socially Neuvo Mexicanos are conservative.  Because they are family oriented socially conservative they got angry when the GOP started bashing tío Juan.

So, NM being solidly blue is a sometime thing.  Should the GOP get its act together wrt Latinos it will move back to a swing state.


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Mon Nov 12th, 2012 at 01:18:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Can can argue it was the Ohio evangelical vote that propelled Obama to the win.  

Certainly there are evangelical websites (no link) making that argument.  And they aren't happy about it.


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Mon Nov 12th, 2012 at 01:11:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Twitter / davidschneider: Proof there's a God and that ...
Proof there's a God and that He's good at math(s) MT @nxthompson National vote total finalized. Mitt Romney got 47% (via @JohnRentoul)


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2012 at 08:37:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Romney is an idiot. In that notorious video, he should have said that 51% of Americans don't pay taxes....
by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2012 at 08:52:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Felix Salmon inadvertently explains why only the government can fun disaster relief: The problem with the Red Cross (By Felix Salmon, Reuters, November 12, 2012)
The trick to being a disaster relief organization is that you need the money and the resources before disaster hits, so that you're prepared when it happens. The Red Cross should have used its balance sheet to go to work as soon as Sandy arrived, should then spend whatever is necessary for as long as it is necessary, and then should use whatever's left over from its latest $117 million windfall to be better prepared for the next disaster.
Nobody can spend out of their balance sheet "whatever is necessary for as long as necessary". You need the only entity that is solvent by fiat, not by balance sheet (the government) to mobilize available resources by spending money into existence. The sovereign money issuer is there for, first and foremost, enabling disaster relief.

You don't hoard money and resources before a disaster, that's a waste of money. You may stockpile some resources but you should mostly create money to commaandeer existing resources.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Nov 12th, 2012 at 12:35:27 PM EST
Critics of The Red Cross carp that it did not act like it was sovereign and had its own currency and, at the same time, carp that the Federal Government is sovereign and does have its own currency. The Red Cross does well with what it has. The US Government could do better were it not being continually undercut by those who do not want government doing anything that does not transfer money to themselves.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Nov 12th, 2012 at 08:49:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Just got back from the bank ... found out it was closed for what is now called "Veteran's Weekend". I'm not into the whole "Are you unemployed cause all the factory jobs were shipped overseas by corporations? So grab a weapon and enable these same corporations to plunder other lands." crap. So I now proclaim this day "Hurray for Truffle's fat ass day!"

The good news ... it's only a life sentence. You eventually leave this planet of idiots.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Mon Nov 12th, 2012 at 12:44:34 PM EST
another day spent cleaning casks and then filling them at a brewery. Helen is tired and achey again

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Nov 12th, 2012 at 12:55:07 PM EST
I read that as "cleaning caskets"
by stevesim on Mon Nov 12th, 2012 at 03:45:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
November 12 edition.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Nov 12th, 2012 at 04:08:04 PM EST
So long as Hollande and the French Government accept the neo-liberal framing of the economic situation they cannot find a way out. The neo-liberal agenda does not envision a 'way out' other than that to be had by cattle entering an abattoir - as pieces of meat on styrofoam wrapped in plastic in a grocer's meat shelf or hanging in a butcher shop.  

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Nov 12th, 2012 at 09:01:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Are neuroscientists the next great architects? - Salon.com

Early in his career, when he was still struggling to find a cure for polio, Jonas Salk retreated to Umbria, Italy, to the monastery at the Basilica of Assisi. The 13th-century Franciscan monastery rises out of the hillside in geometric white stone, with Romanesque arches framing its quiet courtyards. Salk would insist, for the rest of his life, that something about this place--the design and the environment in which he found himself--helped to clear his obstructed mind, inspiring the solution that led to his famous polio vaccine.

"He really thought there was something to this," says the architect Alison Whitelaw, "that the quality of the built environment could affect the performance of the brain."

Today, the near 10-year-old Academy of Neuroscience for Architecture believes that neuroscience could make science's greatest contribution to the field of architecture since physics informed fundamental structural methods, acoustic designs, and lighting calculations in the late 19th century. In September, the academy held its first national conference at, fittingly, the Salk Institute, in La Jolla, California. When the academy solicited proposals from anyone who might have insight or research to contribute, Whitelaw expected a handful of takers. The conference instead received dozens of proposals from all over the world--"from people," Whitelaw says, "we didn't even know were working in this field."

Now, thanks to a $500,000 gift from the estate of solar-energy pioneer Harold Hay, the academy has dedicated resources to fund research at the intersection of these seemingly disparate fields.



"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2012 at 02:18:09 AM EST
From The Forward
An Arizona woman, in despair at the re-election of Democratic President Barack Obama, ran down her husband with the family car in suburban Phoenix on Saturday because he failed to vote in the election, police said on Monday.

Holly Solomon, 28, was arrested after running over husband Daniel Solomon following a wild chase that left him pinned underneath the vehicle.

by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Tue Nov 13th, 2012 at 03:36:09 AM EST


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