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Tuesday Open Thread

by afew Tue Nov 20th, 2012 at 12:50:57 PM EST

Another day, another open thread


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On a Tuesday, no less.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Nov 20th, 2012 at 12:51:25 PM EST
Ah well, Tuesday y'see, that's yer problem

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Nov 20th, 2012 at 02:08:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by epochepoque on Tue Nov 20th, 2012 at 01:44:43 PM EST
Too long to be effective.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 20th, 2012 at 02:24:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm mostly reminded of Happy Tree Friends...

Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères
by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Tue Nov 20th, 2012 at 07:39:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Spent the last day and half crawling around under the house rejiggering the wiring.  

wheeeeeeeeeeeeee!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Tue Nov 20th, 2012 at 01:57:55 PM EST
And just when spain said you could leave and come over

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Nov 20th, 2012 at 02:09:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Winter is icumen in,
Lhude sing oh-brrr!


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Tue Nov 20th, 2012 at 02:17:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
While I have been filling casks, emptying mash tuns and er... other stuff.

they don't need me tomorrow so I may go to a beer festival..for a change

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Nov 20th, 2012 at 02:14:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
so having served the beer gods diligently, it's time for them to pay you back?

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Nov 20th, 2012 at 02:47:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm visiting some people who live in an apartment building constructed in around 1930, and being reminded every minute about why old buildings are a PITA. Electricity, marginal. Plumbing, marginal. Heat, marginal. Security, marginal. Etc.
by asdf on Tue Nov 20th, 2012 at 10:43:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Good solid bricks though. One builder we had in had a drill bit ground down so it looks melted. He left it for us as a memento and didn't charge extra.

-----
sapere aude
by Number 6 on Wed Nov 21st, 2012 at 09:54:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Spent 3+ hours sunday eve watching Cloud Atlas, probably deserves a diary. Before i do, or before someone beats me to it...

  •  How many have seen it?
  •  Is even watching the trailer a spoiler?

One of the finest film experiences i've had, despite...

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Tue Nov 20th, 2012 at 02:06:37 PM EST
Nope, not seen it or read the book. But, then again, you probably gussed that

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Nov 20th, 2012 at 02:10:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
May see the film.  Skimmed through the book the other day and put it back on the shelf.  Don't have the patience or time or spare brain power to sit down and give it the attention it needs.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Tue Nov 20th, 2012 at 02:18:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
probably gonna see the movie. i have some sympathy for that genre. It can't be worse than the tree of life - the worst movie i've ever seen. so bad it made me sick.
by epochepoque on Tue Nov 20th, 2012 at 02:31:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Home Page
Polls show that many members of the public believe that scientists substantially disagree about human-caused global warming. The gold standard of science is the peer-reviewed literature. If there is disagreement among scientists, based not on opinion but on hard evidence, it will be found in the peer-reviewed literature.

I searched the Web of Science for peer-reviewed scientific articles published between 1 January 1991 and 9 November 2012 that have the keyword phrases "global warming" or "global climate change." The search produced 13,950 articles.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Nov 20th, 2012 at 02:47:22 PM EST
The problem is that most people aren't familiar with any particular subject. The job of the journalist--or one view of the job of a journalist--is to do whatever research or interviewing or observation of the people who ARE familiar with the subject, and then correctly summarize and portray the overall situation.

You go to a war zone and obviously can see either side doing bad things, but you also see an overall situation and can put the individual bad things into that larger context. You follow a politician around during his campaign, and see him flub up a speech that he has given dozens of times, and can see that it was an error not a policy statement. You go to a scientific conference and listen to 15 presentations that say X and one presentation and say not X, and try to convey the proper relationship between the two points.

Or, you can be a partisan "journalist" who takes a position and cherry picks the many data points to push a specific viewpoint. At which point your journalism license should be revoked.

by asdf on Tue Nov 20th, 2012 at 10:49:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by Number 6 on Wed Nov 21st, 2012 at 09:56:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Schneier on Security: Anonymous Claims it Sabotaged Rove Election Hacking
Anonymous Claims it Sabotaged Rove Election Hacking

Can anyone make heads or tails of this story? (More links.)

For my part, I'd like a little -- you know -- evidence. Remember that Ohio was not the deciding state in the election. Neither was Florida or Virginia. It was Colorado. So even if there was this magic election-stealing software running in Ohio, it wouldn't have made any difference.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Nov 20th, 2012 at 03:00:49 PM EST
When this appeared in a diary on dKos, Markos exploded, labeling it as conspiracy theory nonsense

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Nov 20th, 2012 at 04:17:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well there you have one of the most respected writers on computer security asking if it's actually possible, and if anyone understands what they're claiming to have done.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Nov 20th, 2012 at 04:39:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
If you believe that Romney's loss was because of a failure to get out the vote, then the problems with ORCA could have contribute to that failure. And since it's a computer system, it could have been hacked. And it's possible that the external communication branch of Anonymous might not be able to describe the technicalities very well. I would say it's possible.

To the extent that it was Colorado that decided the election, the issue there is that the demographics are changing, and changing fast. The Republican operatives I know are still in shock; six months ago they were able to easily shut down a civil unions bill--and now the speaker of the house is openly gay.

http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/0f553ff0b279458fb2cec47fa7475500/CO--Gay-Colorado-Speaker

by asdf on Tue Nov 20th, 2012 at 11:02:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think the problem with ORCA was more that the republicans never tested it properly. I read something about a week ago about how the democrats were testing their system to destruction a month out so that they had a playbook and an experienced team ready to cover all technical issues.

The repugs threw away their old system, but the new one didn't work and they didn't find out until nov 6th.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Nov 21st, 2012 at 02:45:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Israel and Twitter: Where does free speech end and violence begin? -- Tech News and Analysis
One of the most obvious examples of this occurred very early in the attack, when the Israel Defence Forces' official Twitter account posted a tweet that warned Hamas leaders not to "show their faces above ground" because the army was about to launch missiles into their area of the Gaza Strip. This arguably qualifies as a direct and specific threat of violence, which is against Twitter's terms of service -- but so far the tweet remains, and the IDF account has not been sanctioned (there were some reports that it had been suspended, but those appeared to involve another unrelated account). In fact, the IDF account is marked as officially "verified" by Twitter.

And it's not just Twitter, of course: the Israeli army has been uploading videos of rocket attacks to YouTube as the campaign has been unfolding, and some are fairly graphic -- including one that blew up a car carrying the head of the Hamas military wing. That video was removed Thursday morning by YouTube, and it appeared that the site might have decided it breached their terms of service, but then the company said it had removed the video by mistake and it was reinstated.

Threats of violence and shocking images are also something that Facebook has been known to remove, but for now at least the network says it won't be removing content posted by the Israel Defense Forces -- which includes an app that curates photos from Instagram, many of which the army said were taken on the ground during its attack on the Gaza Strip.

by Bernard on Tue Nov 20th, 2012 at 03:42:24 PM EST
When Israel does it, it's okay. With Hamas it's of course a completely different matter.

Is Hamas's Twitter Account Illegal? - The Daily Beast

Is Twitter guilty of aiding Hamas terrorism? That's what a petition by the pro-Israel group Christians United for Israel (CUFI) claims.

Is Hamas's Twitter Account Illegal? - The Daily Beast

The group may have a point. The "material support" law is written so broadly that it makes virtually anything one does to or for a designated group a crime, even if it has no link to terrorist activity of any kind. In fact, in a case I argued in the Supreme Court two years ago, the government argued that advocating for human rights and peace in coordination with a designated group was a crime under the law. The Supreme Court agreed, and rejected our argument that such activity is protected by the First Amendment.   

But why stop at Twitter? What about Google, Facebook, or Verizon, all of which have almost certainly provided their "services," in the form of google searches, social networking, and phone and email access, to Hamas or its members. For that matter, what about Pepsi and Coca-Cola, who have surely sold soda bottles to Hamas in the Gaza Strip?


by Katrin on Tue Nov 20th, 2012 at 04:03:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Here.

I'm SHOCKED, I tell you, SHOCKED

Type: ((shocked))

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Nov 20th, 2012 at 03:46:16 PM EST
many thanks

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Nov 20th, 2012 at 04:20:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
We'll have to list all these macros some place...
by Bernard on Tue Nov 20th, 2012 at 04:44:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Most of the macros are here

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Tue Nov 20th, 2012 at 04:48:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Use sparingly. (How about shocking pink instead?)

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Wed Nov 21st, 2012 at 04:44:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Someone else will complain about that...
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2012 at 09:17:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
@MigeruBlogger
Migeru Shimbun is out! http://paper.li/MigeruBlogger/1351816577 ... ▸ Top stories today via @MigeruBlogger @WhelanKarl @ecoen2tardes


I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 20th, 2012 at 04:15:38 PM EST
Supply-side liberal blog: More on the History of Thought for Negative Nominal Interest Rates (November 20, 2012)
Thanks to a tweet from Migeru, I learned this morning of Willem Buiter's post on negative nominal interest rates, "Negative interest rates: when are they coming to a central bank near you," which discusses in detail the idea of paper currency that depreciates relative to electronic currency (with the electronic currency serving as the unit of account), which plays such an important role in my post "How Subordinating Paper Money to Electronic Money Can End Recessions and End Inflation," (which is primarily a link to my Quartz column "E-Money: How paper currency is holding the US recovery back.")


I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 20th, 2012 at 06:35:04 PM EST
following this op-ed in the NYT.


Between 2007 and 2012, airlines cut the number of domestic passenger flights by 14 percent, according to the Department of Transportation -- with the biggest drops occurring at midsize and smaller regional airports. The five heartland hubs of Cincinnati, Cleveland, Memphis, Pittsburgh and St. Louis have lost a stunning 40 percent of their scheduled flights.
[...]

That's smart business, of course. Why expend the same dollars on jet fuel, pilots and Sun Chips on a flight that's likely to leave half-empty from Memphis when you can trim the number of scheduled departures from the same airport and really pack them in on each flight?
[...]
That is, unless policy makers do what they should have done a long time ago and allow foreign airlines, including discount carriers like Ryanair and global players like Qantas and British Airways, to serve domestic routes in the United States. Why, after all, should an industry that has ingeniously used free-market principles to squeeze the most revenue out of each middle seat be protected from competing in a real free market?
[...]
Competition from foreign airlines would put downward pressure on wages, something that union workers may object to. But by reducing fares and expanding service, it would also increase the demand for air travel and related services -- thus, presumably, creating additional jobs during a time of persistently high unemployment.

I sent a mail to the author:

Dear Sir,
I have read with interest your column on the NYT. I understand that you would welcome an increase in competition between companies for internal flights in the US, and you recommend for that an opening to foreign companies, citing one european and one australian company.

I have nevertheless not understood why and how the constraints existing on the US companies would disappear for foreign companies. Why on earth do you believe that Air France or BA would accept to run a deficit line in the US, where AA restricts its flight to earn money. Do you really believe that the market model of european-type companies is that different from the one for US-based companies? Workers union exist also in the EU, and, apart from allowing Koryo airlines to fly in the US, I do not understand how a major change may be generated through open skies. What may happen is a decrease in market share for US companies, and new opportunities for foreign companies. Passengers might benefit from this, but I am not convinced that this would result in strong differences, the market in the US being already quite competitive.

If I could point to a major difference between Europe and the US on the respect of internal travel, it is that, despite the best efforts of the european commission, there is still, horror! a state-led effort in transportation infrastructure construction in the EU. London-Brussels-Paris High Speed Rail has been massively financed by public owned funds/companies. This railway has effectively put out of business the airways between these three towns, being more cost effective and quicker for the passengers.
Customer experience has therefore been improved by a state-led investment over the course of the last twenty years. Maybe, just maybe, this way of developing your country might be worth investigating...

Cordially.
XB



A free fox in a free henhouse!
by Xavier in Paris on Wed Nov 21st, 2012 at 08:45:41 AM EST
To the author? Why bother? Here is his answer.
by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2012 at 09:11:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
one need to maintain faith in mankind.

A free fox in a free henhouse!
by Xavier in Paris on Wed Nov 21st, 2012 at 09:15:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]


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