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Thursday Open Thread

by afew Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 11:32:42 AM EST

Been here before?


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Thursday Open Thread.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 11:33:03 AM EST
Been here many times. It is a beautiful cloudy day in the Ozarks, 60F just now, high expected to reach 67 this afternoon. I have been patching and painting the east side of our house and later this afternoon will power wash the last ~ 40%, prior to painting. (I have found it moderately obnoxious to power wash in 50F weather with a breeze, so will sieze this last warm day.)

We have 40 year old cedar lap siding and I have to fill cracks with wood putty prior to applying an opaque brown stain. Some of the gaps above windows and between the horizontal siding and the angled siding beneath a gable are too wide for putty, so I am using an exterior non-hardening caulk. But knotholes everywhere need attention. If they look like they may be loose or soon will loosen I apply an exterior wood glue over and around the knot. The actual painting is the easy part and I am happy to do that with temps in the 50s.

It is Thanksgiving Day over here and I am thankful that by back is better, that my knees are still adequate for me to climb a ladder, that I have not fallen off the ladder, etc. Also, that we did not elect Romney and that the Republicans lost seats in both the House and Senate. Meager blessings for meager times.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 11:52:34 AM EST
Caulk and putty will take the stain?

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 01:20:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, both take it quite well. The caulk is 'bronze', actually darker than the opaque stain I am using, but the stain will cover it like paint. At least for now. The previous patch and paint used string and pine resin, but they used a semi-opaque stain to keep some of the color of the cedar. But this side, especially, gets full sun until noon and we both like the color I came up with for the shop, so we went with that. It does preserve the texture of the cedar, but is not thick enough to fill small cracks, etc. Hence the putty.
I hope to avoid, or at least delay, water infiltrating and freezing in small crack, making them larger.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 01:57:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 02:13:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Actually, both the cauld and putty claim to be paintable and stainable, but the caulk requires a 72 hr cure before painting. The putty can be applied with glue and painted before it is really dry, from my experience. I use a damp cloth to wipe off excess putty and stain so that the wood texture remains only minimally impacted, with deep cracks nail holes and knotholes filled.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 02:46:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I find your DIY projects to be totally exhausting.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 03:35:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I could hire someone to paint the house, but my previous experiences have been that they never do adequate prep and it is almost a waste of money. It only worked out the last time because we sold the house not long after the work was done and it hadn't had time to go bad. But I had had no intention of selling when I hired the painters. Just worked out that way. I'm probably doomed by my engineer's attitude that no one else will do it properly. :-)

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 04:13:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I fully understand, Mr. Engineer. I spent some years on the maintenance of a 200 year old 16 room timber Finnish rectory by an occasionally flooding river. Then I discovered low-maintenance paradise: a cybermonk's cell.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 04:18:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
High and dry and low maintenance now, I hope. I did underestimate the maintenance required on our current abode and grounds, but, so long as the body holds out, it gives me something to do and gets me some exercise.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 04:23:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I can report a similar experience, substituting stone and beaten earth for timber, and mill for rectory. Oh and french for finnish.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 04:34:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I should have insisted on a workshop at the beginning.


You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 04:40:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
What I got was a small garage with a bench and the wife's car perenially taking up all the space.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 04:41:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Arthur "Two Sheds" Jackson had nothing on me.  Grange, châpis, étable, remise, cave. Laiterie. Poullailler. Hundreds of square metres of space to fill up with broken junk of various centuries.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 04:54:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
What's a châpis?
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Nov 23rd, 2012 at 01:46:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
In the Monts du Lyonnais, it's an unenclosed covered space, adjacent to the barn, which typically occupies either the middle part or one wing of the traditional U-shaped farmhouse with enclosed courtyard (my definition).

The only lexicographical definition I can find online is
Noms de lieux de Suisse romande, Savoie et environs

Chapedey, Chapet, Chapeu, Chapieu, Chapieux,
Chapis, Chapit, Chapuis, Chapy
Du patois savoyard chapi, chapis, terme désignant une grange, une remise, un hangar ou un abri sommaire pour la récolte ou pour les travailleurs, patois chapit, en particulier « cabane où l´on reléguait les pestiférés », d´un ancien chapiccium, bas latin capile, « cabane »

i.e. visibly it's Arpitan, or franco-provençal if you prefer to be nonsensical.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Fri Nov 23rd, 2012 at 04:45:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
haha, that made me giggle.

funny because i find them really inspiring!  

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 06:16:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, but the pavement always stayed beneath my feet before.

(Seriously, talk about plot lines that could easily be jettisoned? All it does it provide a feeder line to start "Accustomed to her face".)


-----
sapere aude

by Number 6 on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 12:20:03 PM EST


You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 12:52:21 PM EST
If you know the track - Baba O'Reilly - you'll realise what wonderful  heartwarming, pretention-pricking sacrilege this is.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 12:59:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm addicted to Shreds. Whatever they are.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 05:51:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]


"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 02:29:20 PM EST

yeah, i know i got the titles muddled, sorry

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 02:31:33 PM EST
how's everyone doing around wales way, this is what one friend there is seeing in his village


"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 03:17:32 PM EST
I was soaked coming back from work through the lanes.  Not to this extent though.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 03:31:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Nice to be back again after a few days with family in Italy.  Everyone was thrilled to see me, of course.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 03:36:44 PM EST
"Ah you're back. Where's my toy ?"

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Nov 23rd, 2012 at 06:40:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
More like "get out of my f**king face." Fisheye lens, so I was quite close up.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Nov 23rd, 2012 at 06:46:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
American Institute of Physics: Roger Revelle's Discovery
Before scientists would take greenhouse effect warming seriously, they had to get past a counter-argument of long standing. It seemed certain that the immense mass of the oceans would quickly absorb whatever excess carbon dioxide might come from human activities. Roger Revelle discovered that the peculiar chemistry of sea water prevents that from happening. His 1957 paper with Hans Suess is now widely regarded as the opening shot in the global warming debates. This essay not only describes Revelle's discovery in detail, but serves as an extended example of how research found essential material support and intellectual stimulus in the context of the Cold War.

...

Meanwhile Revelle was studying (as usual with collaborators under an ONR contract) the results of a May 1955 test of a nuclear "depth bomb" that the Navy and AEC had exploded a few thousand feet underwater. His team found that the radioactive residues had spread out in remarkably thin sheets, stretching a hundred square kilometers but only a meter thick. Many years later Revelle recalled his surprise that "the water from one layer doesn't exchange with the water from another layer." It was one more example of how the huge resources of government nuclear programs made novel observational methods and data available for many kinds of research. In a 1955 report using the depth bomb test data, Revelle's group concluded that "radioactive wastes introduced into the upper layer might remain there for many years, and would be diluted by a volume of water only a fiftieth to a hundredth the volume of the ocean."(17) The same would apply to almost anything else introduced into the upper layer -- including CO2, a compound for which the Navy and AEC had no interest whatsoever.

...

The draft calculations by the three teams had all addressed mainly the steady-state rates of exchange between atmosphere and ocean. But the crucial question for global warming was a transient effect, the net flux of new CO2 into the water. And as Revelle knew from the carbonate chemistry problems he had been rethinking since the Bikini atoll studies of 1946, sea water is hypersensitive to change. To match an increased level of CO2 in the atmosphere, the number of CO2 molecules in the water would rise only as one factor in a cascading readjustment of the proportions of many types of molecules. In technical terms, sea water is a "buffered" solution, resisting the change in acidity that an increase of carbonates would involve. When some CO2 molecules were absorbed, their presence would alter the balance through a chain of reactions, and in the end some CO2 molecules would be expelled back into the atmosphere. To reach the new equilibrium, Revelle now calculated, the water needed to absorb only about a tenth as much gas as a simple-minded calculation would suppose. While it was true that most of the CO2 molecules added to the atmosphere would wind up in the oceans within a few years, most of these molecules (or others already in the oceans) would promptly be evaporated out.

...

Another two years passed before Bert Bolin and Erik Eriksson explained the sea water buffering mechanism in clear terms and emphasized what it meant. Unlike Revelle, they figured industrial production would indeed climb exponentially, and they calculated that atmospheric CO2 would probably rise 25% by the end of the century. Now the small community of geophysicists began to grasp that they could not rely upon the oceans to absorb all the emissions of fossil fuels.



I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 03:51:55 PM EST
Keynote slides: Creating Massively Successful Networked Organizations

I know you're all fascinated by this advanced thinking...

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 05:06:02 PM EST
Think you'll find this interesting to browse through.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 05:35:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Would like to wish you all a happy whatever



"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 05:15:29 PM EST
Begone, spawn of the Devil! She shall be burned for a wytche, and thou who postest such abomination shall be taken outside the citye and stoned with stones until thou givest up the ghost.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Nov 23rd, 2012 at 01:42:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Have you seen My Week With Marilyn? Wow.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Fri Nov 23rd, 2012 at 05:20:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
it used to be that I did not write much on ET because I did not feel like writing. Now I actually no longer have the time...

In "closing" mode on one project. Plus managing more than dozen other projects. Ah, being an entrepreneur is hard work

Wind power

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 05:55:55 PM EST
If it's a given that we're seeing the death throes of fracking fossil energy, and still further exponential growth online (server farm energy consumption ), then JàP will be nicely in line for the Presidency of the EU when the post becomes available around 2018.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 06:06:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
and Migeru head of the ECB.

you get the meedja vizier gig you wanted!


"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 06:33:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Not in this Universe.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 06:44:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
i wish we could all to be too busy job-creating to blog.

maybe you'll go back to giving us a paris sunset or a peruvian altopiano shot occasionally!

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2012 at 06:37:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Surely you jest!

You can't be an entrepreneur, everyone knows there's no word for it in the French language.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 02:47:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]


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