Welcome to the new version of European Tribune. It's just a new layout, so everything should work as before - please report bugs here.

Weekend Open Thread

by afew Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 10:57:47 AM EST

Anyone for another planet?


Display:

Thanks to Jean Giraud aka Moebius

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 10:58:59 AM EST
Actually I'd really this one back, cos if we don't sort it out real soon, we're gonna need another one pretty damn quick

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 11:28:16 AM EST
Bah, I'll decide on another planet at 6.30 tonight once the FSU-UF game is over.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 11:33:46 AM EST
France-Samoa coming up. Yeah, planets can wait.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 11:44:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well! I dared sneer when Wales lost to Samoa last weekend...

France 0 - 7 Samoa for the moment. Nice game.
Oh Mr Michalak scored a try, and will concert it. 7-7.

There's  simultaneous Wales/All Blacks game, which I will try to download later; couldn't be bothered finding a pub to watch it.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 12:23:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
H-T France 10 Samoa 7.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 12:47:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Wales 0 NZ 6 after 20 mins
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 12:51:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
France won 22-14 but Samoa beat them in a number of ways.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 02:46:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
of Wales-NZ and watched it. Good colourful characters. Not much suspense; plot a bit sloppy in the first half, but a happy ending.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 02:35:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BTW, Samoa are a good side. They gave France a much harder game than either Argentina or Australia, and not just "hard" in the physical sense. Though they are a tough-looking crew, and to see them kneeling in a circle with the staff at the end to sing What A Friend We Have In Jesus is better entertainment than a haka any day.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 04:28:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
for the last two days I've been working at a beer festival and I think I've just about had it. My feet and knees are still killing me now from last night.

Yet I know they're really short of staff for tonight. and it's raining and I've a long walk to the station.

I don't wanna go, but I feel I'd be letting them down if I didn't.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 11:33:55 AM EST
I'll toss a coin.

Heads you stay in, tails you go?

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 11:43:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
ok

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 11:50:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Tails it is.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 12:02:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
drat

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 01:04:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The flesh is weak but the spirit is weaker.

I'm staying in and staying dry

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 01:41:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Probably for the best.  

Pain is Mother Nature's way of telling you:

  1.  You're in a hole

  2.  Stop digging


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 02:11:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
thank you, that's what I wanted to hear

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 02:36:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The coin (for real) wanted you to go and feel knackered rather than sit at home feeling guilty.

Or something.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 02:48:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
some feelings of guilt are more easily shed, especially if I have to walk a couple of miles in the pouring rain to meet them

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 03:01:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Walk it off. :P

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 01:24:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
shan't

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 02:37:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
bubble-prom-crop-nice-01990

Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.
by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 04:08:38 PM EST

dali-picasso-01981

Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.
by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 04:18:02 PM EST

bird-sea-text-01993

Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.
by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 04:41:33 PM EST
CEPR: That Shortage of Skilled Manufacturing Workers is Really a Shortage of Employers Willing to Pay the Market Wage (24 November 2012)
News stories have been filled with reports of managers of manufacturing companies insisting that they have jobs open that they can't fill because there are no qualified workers. Adam Davidson at the NYT looked at this more closely and found that the real problem is that the managers don't seem to be interested in paying for the high level of skills that they claim they need.


I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 06:30:12 PM EST
The law of the market only applies to certain things. Labour is not one of them.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 04:25:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Who Could Have Predicted?
by Bernard on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 05:39:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
If any of the newspapers cared about keeping touch with reality, they would take a much deeper - and more thorough look at this. How many jobs are actually being left open? What are the pay rates for similar work in other countries?
by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 12:55:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Politics USA: Studies Reveal that Conservatism is Promoted When People Rely on `Low-Effort' Thinking (November 21st, 2012)
Good news for conservatives as a compilation of four recent social psychology studies demonstrate that rather than necessarily being pathological, political conservatism is promoted when people rely on low-effort thinking.

In the four studies conducted by Scott Eidelman, Christian S. Crandall, Jeffrey A. Goodman, and John C. Blanchar published by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc, they concluded, "(P)olitical conservatism is promoted when people rely on low-effort thinking. When effortful, deliberate responding is disrupted or disengaged, thought processes become quick and efficient; these conditions promote conservative ideology... low-effort thought might promote political conservatism because its concepts are easier to process, and processing fluency increases attitude endorsement."

Ever wonder why conservatives can't seem to understand that people are not always to blame for the circumstances they find themselves in? While personal responsibility sounds like it makes perfect sense initially, when you walk people through the various life circumstances that can render people temporarily dependent upon government help, it becomes clear that things are not so simple. These studies demonstrate the impact of correctional/effortful explanations on political ideology, "This analysis also suggests that some forms of political ideology may result from intentional and effortful correction. For example, Wänke and Wyer (1996) found that liberals scored higher than conservatives on the Attributional Complexity Scale (Fletcher, Danilovics, Fernandez, Peterson, & Reeder, 1986), an indicator that the former generate more complex and detailed (if not more effortful) explanations for the behavior of others."

Or: knee-jerk thinking makes you a jerk.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 06:51:09 PM EST
Everything was going swimmingly tonight with the Singing D performing at Savoy theatre with 23 piece UMO jazz orchestra. She was doing her own song Hyperventilating with a big band arrangement and it was great. I had decided to shoot from the wings and also had an HD spy cam on a short mic stand on stage.

Crowd goes wild. I'm feeling rather happy as I get back to the dressing rooms after they did 3 encores - until the stage crew informs that they were unable to record sound due to last minute technical problems. So - great picture, no sound. Very useful.

Then to dinner at the new Katsomo snobbateria next to the theatre with members of a genetically entangled mixture of Finnish industrial families representing possibly billions of wealth. Some of them are quite eccentric and rather nice. I normally sit with the black sheep branch of the Ex. The daughters of course remain fully fledged members of the black sheep branch. I no longer carry Teamster papers, but I obviously did a fair job of British charm when I was unionized, because I was kissed a great deal by people of the matriarchical persuasion, cascading in jewellery and good causes.

I was told, when I joined the family 25 years ago, not entirely in jest, that mongrel genes were needed to freshen up the dynastic bloodline. But I've told you this before.

What I really wanted to discuss is the interior of said restaurant. It was absolutely ghastly. Hanna, the theatrical wonderlady and wife of one of my ex-bros-in-law, and I identified 32 different styles of decoration that went far beyond the mix and match cultural hypocrisy of Santa Fe, or even Tracey Emin's version of Buckingham Palace as planned, elevated and sectioned by Gilbert and George.

I mean - go to the link, click on photo gallery and feel gravity molesting your jaw. And they've chickened out of showing the vast fake gold-framed  canvases of Rubenesque ladies showing their bums - I should rococo. Nor do they illustrate the fact that this chubby pink arse motif has been transferred - at some considerable cost, I imagine - to the carpet of the loge section.

I probably forgot to mention that The Circus also owns the theatre and the snobbateria. They don't do cheap. This dog's breakfast design is a monstrosity and the work of a charlatan, or possibly a committee of charlatans. The space is great, the service is courteous and pro but relaxed, the food was passable - especially when you're not paying for it - but....this is the worst interior I've ever been in in pursuit of pleasure.

Good, that's got that out of my system. Now I can sleep justly.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 07:16:14 PM EST
One senses overwhelming experience in this architecture design critique.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 08:54:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm scared to look in case I like it

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 03:27:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Don't worry.

Amazingly pretentious lack of talent comes to mind.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 04:30:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I know. I do apologize for my shortcomings ;-)

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 06:02:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
But really, I don't understand the mindset that produces such outcomes. Maybe I have misunderstood the potential dynamic tensions within a mash-up, or collage if you will. Maybe I can no longer get the same high out of jarring and clashing.

But it wasn't designed as an aesthetic experience. This restaurant was designed by and for desensitized people who don't care how polluted any of their environments become.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 12:39:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There's a similar (and to my mind bizarre) situation in London where the restaurant types have no understanding of the soundscapes their decoration choices create.

As a result it's getting harder and harder to go to dinner and actually hear anything the other person says. Fine for drunk Shoxton types who only want to talk anyway I guess... but still...

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 12:45:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, I've noticed. It's happened in Helsinki too. And the shrillness is deliberate.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 01:00:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
US restaurants are enhancing their assaultive soundscapes by placing TVs everywhere.  This adds visual hash to the environment thus ensuring a wretched experience will be had by all.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 01:12:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That's the worst part of dining out... the damn noise. I'm thinking of America, of course; not such a problem in rural Bavaria.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 01:15:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
LIke in Japan, what's wrong with choosing your DJ for the speakers embedded in your table, as well as your food order from the tablet embedded in your table.

Damn old fogeys, always searching for peace and quiet.

(Insert smiley here.)

won't be long before you can eat your meal out on the dance floor, with a chest tray.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 01:46:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Sven Triloqvist:
designed by and for desensitized people who don't care how polluted any of their environments become

Just as long as they're the environments where they want to be seen.

Actually, I don't think it's an entirely new phenomenon.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 03:46:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Not new - agreed, but the collateral damage affects the rest of us a lot more.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 03:49:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Interior decoration seems to be bifurcated between the "Operating Room" and "Throw Everything, Everywhere" Schools.  Not fond of either one but I don't get a vote.  

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 01:03:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Guardian - Growing food in the desert: is this the solution to the world's food crisis?

The scrubby desert outside Port Augusta, three hours from Adelaide, is not the kind of countryside you see in Australian tourist brochures. The backdrop to an area of coal-fired power stations, lead smelting and mining, the coastal landscape is spiked with saltbush that can live on a trickle of brackish seawater seeping up through the arid soil. Poisonous king brown snakes, redback spiders, the odd kangaroo and emu are seen occasionally, flies constantly. When the local landowners who graze a few sheep here get a chance to sell some of this crummy real estate they jump at it, even for bottom dollar, because the only real natural resource in these parts is sunshine.

Which makes it all the more remarkable that a group of young brains from Europe, Asia and north America, led by a 33-year-old German former Goldman Sachs banker but inspired by a London theatre lighting engineer of 62, have bought a sizeable lump of this unpromising outback territory and built on it an experimental greenhouse which holds the seemingly realistic promise of solving the world's food problems.

Indeed, the work that Sundrop Farms, as they call themselves, are doing in South Australia, and just starting up in Qatar, is beyond the experimental stage. They appear to have pulled off the ultimate something-from-nothing agricultural feat - using the sun to desalinate seawater for irrigation and to heat and cool greenhouses as required, and thence cheaply grow high-quality, pesticide-free vegetables year-round in commercial quantities.



keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 05:51:39 AM EST
Since the world's food problem has not got anything to do with being able to sustainably produce enough food on the existing land with existing techniques, I fail to see how this helps in any way.

Most of the food crisis comes from the usual inequalities in land and capital repartition... How much land for example is being devoted to extensive bovine production ? Or to f***ing golf courses ? Or to very low density suburbia and exurbia ?

Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères

by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 01:07:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Not to mention "cheaply" is a very ambiguous word.

Cheap enough to compete with other producers in Australia?

Cheaper than that?

Cheap enough to feed people in Eritrea or Togo?

(Although, Togo is a great example of what you were talking about, all the "cash crops" using up the best land...)

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 01:56:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, they're growing vegetables. Using solar energy to desalinate seawater and manage greenhouse temperatures. Sounds OK to me, and maybe they're developing some useful techniques.

As to feeding the world, that's another question entirely...

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 03:53:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
One of the many charms of Mexico is the music. Took a quick mental trip there this Sunday to pick up some memories, and brought this back to share:

by sgr2 on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 09:32:17 AM EST
The Gema hates us.
by Katrin on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 10:59:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah phooey. I think you might have liked it.
by sgr2 on Mon Nov 26th, 2012 at 12:56:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Proxies are your friends.

One-off solution.
Permanent solution.

- Jake

Austerity can only be implemented in the shadow of a concentration camp.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Wed Nov 28th, 2012 at 11:53:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
More emotion shown in that 195 seconds that most Finns manage in a lifetime.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 01:01:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A ranchero song sung here by Chavela Vargas who died earlier this year. Read the Wikipedia entry to get the full colour.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 03:56:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
about this...

I realize the applepieness is crucial to reaching a certain very wide audience by appealing to their patriotism and owning of rightness, but at the same time these are the very values that caused the problem in the first place.

I find it increasingly hard to be convinced by anything coming out of the States, from any persuasive lobby. In our local supermarkets there are short shelf sections that contain imported US products. Almost all of them offer processed fantasy foods of dubious nutritional value. It's life in a pack, just add life.

This does not mean that all US food is like that - it means that for Finnish shoppers, the perception of US food is like that.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 12:55:35 PM EST
It's life in a pack, just add life.

midway between ageless aphorism and snappy madmen copy-

love it! fits my sig to a T

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 04:28:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]

I think these are meant to stop flooding, but I don't see how they are supposed to work

Venice seems to have found a way to keep this nonsense under control

Some lawbreakers

One side-effect of the ban on pigeons has been that either the seagulls have come back, or become more noticeable, and seagulls are pretty good at making clear to the pigeons that the food is for them. The problem is that pigeons generally waddle on to the next feeding place, while seagulls fly. And they come in fast, only just missing the tourists (or so it seems to me)

by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 01:30:28 PM EST
Subject was meant to be "Venice". Autocomplete at work again.
by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 01:31:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 04:16:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by Bernard on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 05:18:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
one can never have too much

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 07:02:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
http://theairtightgarage.tumblr.com/

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Nov 26th, 2012 at 12:47:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oops. Confetti at Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade Was Made of Still-Readable Confidential Police Docs

This year's Thanksgiving parade was kind of a heartbreaker after a a Yonkers man died while clowning. But things may be getting a little bit worse.

The magical specks of color that float down the city streets are normally just a mishmash of multicolored confetti, but this year, shredded confidential documents from the Nassau Police Department were also in the air.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 01:59:14 PM EST
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 02:35:32 PM EST
So my nearsightedness and astigmatism are getting better, my presbyopia is non-existent, but I have no discernible physical problems that may be causing this.

My physicians are stumped.

by stevesim on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 02:53:59 PM EST
Twitter / IanDonovanVP: .@RepPaulRyan changed his name ...
.@RepPaulRyan changed his name back AND HE UNFOLLOWED @MITTROMNEY


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 07:03:06 PM EST


Display:
Go to: [ European Tribune Homepage : Top of page : Top of comments ]