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Tuesday Overtly Open Thread

by afew Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 11:46:48 AM EST

T.O.O.T.


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Pip pip!
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 11:47:09 AM EST

be still... haha

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 12:09:01 PM EST
We know a song about that, don't we



keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 12:45:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Isn't that planet also rotating? At around 1000 MPH at the equator, or maybe 500 km/h at European latitudes?

Handily, the Imperial System shows the Earth's circumference at about 24,000 miles, which nicely matches up with 24 hours. Take that, SI enthusiasts!

So in the 5 seconds it took to read that posting, we moved an additional, well, uh, the math... 3600 seconds per hour, five seconds, 500 divided by something times something is about three quarters of another km added onto that 3000...oh well never mind then...

by asdf on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 02:09:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
relative to ?  as most everything in the universe is moving...
by stevesim on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 02:46:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 04:58:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It rained all last night so that this morning there was a queue of traffic outside the door and I realised I was probably not going to make it to the brewery just a few miles away down increasingly small country roads which cross several streams all of which are temporarily raging torrents.

So I had another cup of tea

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 12:49:10 PM EST
Cups of tea is what got England through the Blitz, I always say.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 12:55:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Can't start my day without tea. And 4 - 5 cuppas a day.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 01:05:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Real men drink dark roast Starbucks coffee at $5 a cup and like it.
by asdf on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 02:10:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Starbucks didn't get England through the Blitz.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 02:30:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Coffee is the spittle of satan, and besides Starbucks don't pay any taxes in the UK and so should be righteously boycotted

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 02:31:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There is a german children song warning of the dangers of coffee - the turkish draught - and admonishing the children not to be like musulmans.

That said americans have no coffee culture so real men don't drink starbucks or other american abominations soling the name of coffee.

by IM on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 02:57:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It does't seem to have worked. There are already 150 Starbucks branches in Germany and they are planning to expand to 1000.

Italy, on the other hand, has still kept them out.

by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 03:01:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
the italian like the austrian coffee tradition is of course much stronger.

I blame all these pc people who have suppressed this important educational song. In my childhood there wasn't any of this starbuck.

by IM on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 03:08:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Austria has given in too. There's even one directly across from the Hotel Sacher.
by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 03:11:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The fall of western civilization is near. The Kaffeehaus is the center of austrian culture, launching important people like Herzl and Hitler and...

Anyway, something must be done. The EU should intervene.

by IM on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 03:16:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, the Italians invented espresso, right, which is what Starbucks claims to sell. So I suppose it makes sense for the originators to try to keep control of their product, like France did with her grapevines...well, except for America saving that whole industry...so it will probably be a while until you can get a good coffee in Milan or wherever...or at least until Starbucks decides to change marketing strategy and open some stores in Italy...

http://innovationzen.com/blog/2007/01/15/why-starbucks-is-not-present-in-italy/

by asdf on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 04:43:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You can get good coffee in Milan at any hour, any place. You do not get coffee at Starbucks. You get a brew couched in American baby talk and free internet.

McDonald's is just as good.

by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 04:55:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I was surprised there weren't at least a few starbucks in the more touristy places in Italy - then I took note that coffee drinks in Italy cost about 60% of what you'd pay at sbux.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 05:20:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's not Star-bucks for nothing.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Nov 28th, 2012 at 02:31:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Star-five-bucks.
by asdf on Wed Nov 28th, 2012 at 09:33:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Germans are not dissuaded by the name?

Starb-ucks? Drink it and die?

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Wed Nov 28th, 2012 at 10:12:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Du café, du café,
Ne bois pas tant de café.
La boisson des Turcs n'est pas pour les enfants,
Elle te rend pâle, faible et languissant.
Tu n'es pas musulman
Et tu peux t'en passer.

Carl Gottlieb Hering (1766-1853)

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Wed Nov 28th, 2012 at 04:39:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Aw, come on, it only costs anything close to 5$ if you're getting the "Venti" (or XL, in normal sizing), which is easily a full day's worth of coffee.

People talk all kinds of crap about Starbucks, but the fact is that in most of the country, it brought decent coffee to the wilderness.  For every place that had an actual boutique coffee shop, there were thousands where the residents have never even heard of such a thing, and where "coffee" meant freeze-dried ground shlock left to burn on a hot pad for hours.

Starbucks coffee is consistently not bad, and occasionally good.  What more can you really ask for?

Yeah, they sell lots of milkshakes as well, but whatever.  Not everybody likes coffee.

by Zwackus on Wed Nov 28th, 2012 at 08:22:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Actually, in Colorado Springs, a "tall" (i.e. small) soy mocha is $4.03.

But your point about coffee quality is certainly true. I have a choice of about a dozen coffee shops or restaurants that serve cappuccino within a kilometer of my house, and the non-Starbucks products are universally worse and less consistent.

by asdf on Wed Nov 28th, 2012 at 09:42:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Taste differs, I guess. I've never liked a Starbucks cup of coffee. In New Orleans, I'd go to the CC's (Community Coffee cafe) for my coffee with chicory.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Wed Nov 28th, 2012 at 01:05:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yeah, but a soy mocha is not a coffee, it's a speciality drink.  I'm talking about plain black coffee, and Starbucks does a pretty decent cup of plain black coffee.
by Zwackus on Wed Nov 28th, 2012 at 11:28:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't drink coffee, so I don't much care about stabucks or all the hundred other over-priced foam outlets that festoon high streets around the world

However, what i want to know is why it is practically impossible to find a decent cup of tea anywhere, even in the UK. Near, but not actually boiling, water doesn't make decent tea. Especially when poured into a cold cup and cold milk poured straight on top of it. You used to be able to buy tea that had been sitting in a pot for half an hour or so, a bit stewed but at least it had strength and flavour. now you can only get cardboard flavoured warm brown water. And. I. Hates. They.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Nov 28th, 2012 at 12:59:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That's no excuse. They also have lots of sorts of tea.
by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Wed Nov 28th, 2012 at 02:47:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
WTF ?

Proper Tea has milk in it. However none of those are remotely brown enough to count as the brewed part of the equation. They all look suspiciously like the cardboard flavoured warm brown water I originally complained about.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Nov 28th, 2012 at 02:58:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Please diary on "proper tea".

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 29th, 2012 at 04:02:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Here's George Mikes in 1946:

The trouble with tea is that originally it was quite a good drink.

So a group of the most eminent British scientists put their heads together, and made complicated biological experiments to find a way of spoiling it.

(I must say that most of the natives I've met will say "not too much milk".)


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sapere aude

by Number 6 on Thu Nov 29th, 2012 at 06:39:36 AM EST
[ Parent ]
But Mikes is all wrong. The English used to have milk in their hot water long before they had even heard of tea.

by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Thu Nov 29th, 2012 at 07:18:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah, is there any (western) European foible that has not been referenced by Asterix?

(A delight to read painstakingly struggly your way through in Latin, by the way.
"nubecula lactis" - a drop of milk
"ius mentae" and "cervisiam tepidam" left as an exercise for the reader.)


-----
sapere aude

by Number 6 on Thu Nov 29th, 2012 at 07:55:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
They never made it to Scotland. Obelix would probably have disapproved of the wild boar haggis.
by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Thu Nov 29th, 2012 at 11:24:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Already in England, he was moved to tears by the lamb boiled in mint. "Sniff! Poor thing!"
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Nov 29th, 2012 at 11:37:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
How To Be An Alien
I believe, without undue modesty, that I have certain qualifications to write on "how to be an alien." I am an alien myself. What is more, I have been an alien all my life. Only during the first 26 years of my life was I not aware of this plain fact. I was living in my own country, a country full of aliens, and I noticed nothing particular or irregular about myself; then I came to England, and you can imagine my painful surprise.

I might have written that myself. I shall buy the book.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Thu Nov 29th, 2012 at 07:58:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Once a foreigner, always a foreigner. There is no way out for him. He may become British; he can never become English.

Now there is a profound truth, simply stated.


keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Nov 29th, 2012 at 01:49:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Which illustrates the superiority of the French over the English.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 08:40:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
We know Karl Marx was wrong when he claimed that "Proper Tea" was theft

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Nov 29th, 2012 at 07:10:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That was Proudhon, not Marx.

/PN

- Jake

Austerity can only be implemented in the shadow of a concentration camp.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Thu Nov 29th, 2012 at 10:38:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I know about Proper Tea, properly stewed, with milk and sugar. I have also learned, in later life, to appreciate the infinite variety and quality of drinks to be brewed from the same botanical stock.

I commiserate with the loss of Proper Tea, insofar as it hasn't been displaced by something better, but with a pale imitation of itself.

In France, you've probably got a much better chance of getting a decent cup of tea, Proper or otherwise, than in England. Fewer tea shops, but better.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Thu Nov 29th, 2012 at 08:04:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Huh?

The French think tea is made by dipping a bag of hay and sweepings in a cup of warm water.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Nov 29th, 2012 at 08:42:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm not talking about supermarket teabags, but boutique teas sold in snobby shops, I'm afraid. And actual tea shops.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Thu Nov 29th, 2012 at 09:27:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I've never found the upmarket tea shops in France had enough turnover for the tea to be fresh enough. But then, I don't live in a gastronomical capital.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Nov 29th, 2012 at 11:03:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
What do you mean "not fresh"? We get it straight from Lutetia on ox carts.

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sapere aude
by Number 6 on Thu Nov 29th, 2012 at 11:14:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Nov 29th, 2012 at 11:53:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
We're paying Uderzo a monthly royalty, right?


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sapere aude
by Number 6 on Wed Dec 5th, 2012 at 10:38:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Cardboard-flavoured warm brown water without milk didn't get England through the Blitz.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Nov 29th, 2012 at 01:38:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
And closure.
Thread complete, y'all.


-----
sapere aude
by Number 6 on Thu Nov 29th, 2012 at 03:55:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well then you're not a candidate for moving to Colorado Springs after all. Because of our 2000 meter altitude, water boils at about 200F/93C. Before microwaves, everybody cooked in pressure cookers because otherwise you starve before your potatoes are soft enough to eat.
by asdf on Thu Nov 29th, 2012 at 11:19:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
did anyone see the most recent Astérix movie ("au service de sa majesté") - it nicely revisited the tea drinking habit (among other things - a fun film altogether)

Wind power
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 05:02:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Not yet. Read the book, though.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Nov 28th, 2012 at 02:32:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Toot was the street name (Kensington High Street) of Peruvian cocoa powder during my days as a ligger.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 01:14:27 PM EST
Urban Dictionary: Toot
Toot:
1)Slang for fart
2)a loud sound
3)the blast hole on the side of a bong or pipe
4)To bounce your butt up and down during sexual intercourse
5)To snort powdery illegal drugs
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 02:28:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The underground market was a bit of a legend in that score (score - geddit)

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 02:32:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Peruvian marching powder?
by stevesim on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 02:47:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I follow the mythology of Firesign Theatre...


You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 04:16:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by asdf on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 04:47:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I've been waylaid by Montezuma's revenge in Guadalajara. I'm recovering, but I might end up going to a clinic tomorrow anyway.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 03:50:33 PM EST
Aaaargh. Get well soon.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 04:04:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yikes, get well soon.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 04:05:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That is where I got it in the '60s, from a nice looking little green side salad at a Howard Johnson's cafe. I think Lomotil and Immodium are the store bought descendents of what the Peace Corps folks fondly referred to as 'El Tapon'. It at least made it safe for me to travel after a day, though the misery lingered for a couple more days. Fortunately I didn't suffer from motion sickness, as we were traveling to Autlan de Navarra, which was a delightful little town with a canvas covered mercado which sold fresh squeezed orange juice from local oranges for five centavos per half litre - virtually free. Across from the mercado was the bandstand in the town square. Autlan sits on the floor of a valley surrounded by mountains soaring a couple of thousand feet higher, up to around 6,000 feet, where you have cloud forest some of the time. On the western slopes there were stands of virgin walnut trees between four and five thousand feet in elevation - a good location for a walnut saw mill and veneer factory. Don't know if those stands remain. Probably do.  

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 04:24:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I have no idea where I got it. I always assume it's the least likely candidate. I've had plenty of uncooked leafy and otherwise veggies down here with no issue, and I ate nothing of the sort for the 48 hours before I got sick.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 05:59:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, I don't really KNOW where I got it, but that was the only time I didn't share a meal with my traveling companion, an old hand at field work in rural Mexico, so I just presumed.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Nov 28th, 2012 at 02:08:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
please be careful

pharmacies and doctors in Mexico will give you an antibiotic which is common there, chloamphenicol, which may cause aplastic anemia, by killing all of your blood stem cells

Drugs that cause aplastic anaemia may also be related to benzene. The antibiotic, chloramphenicol and the anti-inflammatory, phenylbutazone are two examples. Neither is commonly used in Western countries, but because they are cheap to produce, they are in widespread use in the developing world.

by stevesim on Wed Nov 28th, 2012 at 03:06:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
@MigeruBlogger
Migeru Shimbun is out! http://paper.li/MigeruBlogger/1351816577 ... ▸ Top stories today via @15MpaRato @NewNewDeal


I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Nov 27th, 2012 at 07:04:06 PM EST


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