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Weekend Open Thread

by afew Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 11:55:41 AM EST

An Open Thread for the weekend


Display:
Jot down your weekend thoughts.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Nov 3rd, 2012 at 12:13:56 PM EST
Tree that looks like a wind turbine set to silence whiny rurally-based types | NewsBiscuit

Environmentalists are hopeful that a newly discovered breed of tree that resembles a wind turbine could break the deadlock over the controversial power source, as well as silencing some irksome people with nice houses.

The new breed, which was discovered growing in a copse behind a major genetic laboratory, has three pale cream branches capable of rotating at 32rpm in a 10-knot breeze at a height of 146 metres.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Nov 3rd, 2012 at 12:24:53 PM EST
"discovered" growing in a copse behind a major genetic laboratory

Uh huh.  We all know what that means, right?

Now where are we going and what's with the handbasket?

by budr on Sat Nov 3rd, 2012 at 01:58:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Wind farm noise does harm sleep and health, say scientists

Wind farm noise causes "clear and significant" damage to people's sleep and mental health, according to the first full peer-reviewed scientific study of the problem.

American and British researchers compared two groups of residents in the US state of Maine. One group lived within a mile of a wind farm and the second group did not.

Both sets of people were demographically and socially similar, but the researchers found major differences in the quality of sleep the two groups enjoyed.

The findings provide the clearest evidence yet to support long-standing complaints from people living near turbines that the sound from their rotating blades disrupts sleep patterns and causes stress-related conditions.

[Torygraph Alert]

Wind power

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 04:56:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
is there no way to attenuate the problem wrt wind turbine design?
by stevesim on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 05:10:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
First you have to have a problem, perhaps then you can "attenuate" it.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaļs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 05:17:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well having lived within 150 metres of one, I can say it's  something I  noticed more than once or twice during a year

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 05:20:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
  1. regulations for modern mills are 500m or often much greater. That you were closer likely means you had some awareness that some technology was in some motion. Were you also aware of the coal dust in your nose from +20km distance?

  2.  Did you notice the light blue subsonic vortices?

  3. If you still live in such a dangerous zone AND if you haven't seen any one-horned goats, you should leave immediately.


"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaļs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 06:18:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The "US state of Maine" is one of the world's most available locations for scientific literature on windpower's effect, having nearly 0.00069% of the global windmill capacity.

To be balanced, some scientists have noticed a distinct loss of sleep among one-horned badgers.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaļs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 05:14:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Gilligan cites another anti-wind lobbying org with a fake name, the Renewable Energy Foundation. See also Wikipedia.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 06:05:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Other critics such as Maria McCaffery, chief executive of RenewableUK, a trade body that represents more than 600 wind and marine energy firms, says the Renewable Energy Foundation's true purpose is diametrically opposed to the interests of the wind energy industry. "It is an anti-wind lobbying organisation," she told BusinessGreen. "I'd like to know where the renewable energy part of their remit is. They don't foster or promote or develop, they just try to undermine the case for wind energy all the time."[6]


"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaļs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 06:22:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Wind turbine syndrome: who's doing the research?

Are people getting sick because they live near wind turbines? Opponents to windfarms have been collecting testimonies alleging that communities near wind developments have been suffering a clutch of symptoms they're calling 'wind turbine syndrome'. But although studies that appear to support these allegations have started appearing in journals, the medical community remains skeptical that the evidence base proves the claims. We've taken a closer look.




Wind power
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Mon Nov 5th, 2012 at 03:52:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Infrasound seems to be a popular explanation.

Heavy leg syndrome?

-----
sapere aude

by Number 6 on Tue Nov 6th, 2012 at 11:00:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Weather is faaaab u luuusssss; physics tutoring in 30 minutes; life is great!

The good news ... it's only a life sentence. You eventually leave this planet of idiots.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Sat Nov 3rd, 2012 at 12:35:40 PM EST
life is great!

Who are you and what have you done with The Twank?

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Sat Nov 3rd, 2012 at 01:26:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
keeps µù#à£ing hanging. It destroyed my "marriage" diary a couple of times.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Sat Nov 3rd, 2012 at 01:34:53 PM EST
I first read this as it destroyed your "marriage" a couple of times... Puts things in perspective.

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!
by A swedish kind of death on Sat Nov 3rd, 2012 at 02:07:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Whichever O/S you're using, get a different one.

(It won't help, but you'll be annoyed/entertained enough that the problems don't seem so big.)

-----
sapere aude

by Number 6 on Tue Nov 6th, 2012 at 11:15:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]


"Beware of the man who does not talk, and the dog that does not bark." Cheyenne
by maracatu on Sat Nov 3rd, 2012 at 03:37:21 PM EST
Brilliant, her reminds me somehow of Adam Green. But he gets it.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaļs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 04:15:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]


"Beware of the man who does not talk, and the dog that does not bark." Cheyenne
by maracatu on Sat Nov 3rd, 2012 at 03:49:02 PM EST
Reminded me of this:

Mitt Romney, white vote: Parsing the narrow, tribal appeal of the Republican nominee. - Slate Magazine

There is a real, airtight bubble in this election, but it's not Obama's. As a middle-aged white man, in fact, I'm breaching it. White people--white men in particular--are for Mitt Romney. White men are supporting Mitt Romney to the exclusion of logic or common sense, in defiance of normal Americans. Without this narrow, tribal appeal, Romney's candidacy would simply not be viable. Most kinds of Americans see no reason to vote for him.


A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!
by A swedish kind of death on Sat Nov 3rd, 2012 at 04:45:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
the Washington Post reporting that the election is "more polarized along racial lines than any other contest since 1988"...

"Minorities" is not a race (nor, you may have noticed, is "women"). Minorities and women are the people standing still, while white men run away from them.


But they are not running away because they are racists. Just ask them.


As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 02:57:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
your attention...

"Beware of the man who does not talk, and the dog that does not bark." Cheyenne
by maracatu on Sat Nov 3rd, 2012 at 03:51:00 PM EST


"Beware of the man who does not talk, and the dog that does not bark." Cheyenne
by maracatu on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 03:08:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Dirty Russian Money - BND cautions against bailout for Cyprus
In a secret report, the Foreign Intelligence Service came to the conclusion that the aid, which the European Union will pay may soon the country would especially benefit owners of Russian black money accounts.

According to the findings of the BND Russian citizens have deposited $26 billion in local banks, reports Der Spiegel. That is more than the annual economic output of the country. These deposits are secured when the banks of the island republic will soon be supported by European bailout funds. In addition, the BND complained that the country still offers opportunities for money laundering.

by epochepoque on Sat Nov 3rd, 2012 at 05:05:57 PM EST
Wuahahaha

Von überall könnte das Volk, Urbrut alles Undemokratischen, Zelle des Terrors, über die gewählten Hüter von Wachstum und Wohlstand® kommen. - flatter
by generic on Sat Nov 3rd, 2012 at 06:40:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
the aid, which the European Union will pay may soon the country would especially benefit owners of Russian black money accounts.

And everyone knows that the 'aid' is supposed to benefit the owners of EU core elite black money accounts.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 03:03:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]

a-boys-raleigh-nice-montage

Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.
by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Sat Nov 3rd, 2012 at 05:41:21 PM EST
Trouble is it's full of rude pushy space-invading French people. Not enough Russian oligarchs yet, apparently... ;)
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 03:52:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]

The Ruskies aren't all "oligarchs" even when very rich, one nice Russian, friend of a friend, bought the whole table champagne in Monaco hotel bar - red wine for me - let me choose (like a nice Brit I chose one of the lower priced ones - he liked it, so just bought two more bottles). His father was a university lecturer - on US history.

I just try to do as the French do, nearly floored an old lady on collision course the other day - I'm getting there :-)

Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.

by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Mon Nov 5th, 2012 at 10:41:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
At the Chateau above Nice, trying to get away from the usual media dominance:

cafe-chzteau-media-nice-0086

Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.

by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Sat Nov 3rd, 2012 at 05:45:20 PM EST
Dramatic cloud above Nice Theatre:

a-theatre-cloud-nice-0076

Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.

by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Sat Nov 3rd, 2012 at 05:47:51 PM EST
Ah, Guinness



keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 12:50:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Speaking of beer, I ran across a story today that claimed that beer aged like bourbon was all the rage.

Allgash Curieux (Bourbon Barrel-Aged Triple) - Beer Advocate

While I'm more of wine drinker than a beer drinker, I am curious about this. Has anyone tasted beer aged this way? Comments?

by sgr2 on Mon Nov 5th, 2012 at 12:50:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Can't help you.  The nearest we come is purchasing Trader Joe's Holiday Ale.  

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Mon Nov 5th, 2012 at 01:09:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Only a few weeks ?? Crikey, there are loads of beers that have spent a few weeks of contemplation. Whisky barrel aged is quite popular, although I don't really like them (I don't like whisky).

Sherry barrels and bourbon barrels are also popular. Some are aged just for a few weeks, some rest for a year.

Of course, in Belgium they're a bit more extreme, some beers sit for 5 years in the barrel

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Nov 5th, 2012 at 03:18:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
OMG! Yesterday I was walking trough Surfers Paradise here on a Gold Coast with a friend that was visiting me.
We had a drink across the road of this NEW BUSINESS.

OXYGEN STATION!
They are producing OXYGEN tasting like fruit and stuff and you can inhale it on the spot.
They claim that you can use it for DETOX , SPORTS,PARTY,AIRLINE TRAVEL, BEAUTY AND STRESSS.
But I think it is actually mostly for after party hangovers.
Great invention!
Unbelievable...
How healthy it may be to inhale oxygen?
by vbo on Sat Nov 3rd, 2012 at 08:21:57 PM EST
in small doses it can improve brain function. but jet pilots get 100% oxygen all the time and it fries their brains.
by epochepoque on Sat Nov 3rd, 2012 at 08:43:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Do you have this kind of shops/businesses in EU / USA ?
Let me show you price list.

Alcohol / drugs are huge problem here in Australia.What is interesting is that girls are best "customers" for police/ ambulance especially on Saturday night. Gold Coast is a special place for partying and I suppose these guys have a lot of customers there and business is booming. As horrific as this photo is this picture tells more then thousand words...

Now tell me...western civilization...where we are going? This kind of business will soon come to your city...everything abnormal is now considered normal.

by vbo on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 10:14:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
they had those in malls Vancouver Canada when I lived there.
there was also a problem with binge drinking there as well, as opposed to the French part of Canada, where the problem did not yet exist.   Unfortunately, that problem has spread to all parts of the world by now.
by stevesim on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 01:18:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Synopsis of Ben Elton's Gasping

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 12:38:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 04:30:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
TED Blog | The complexities of the psychopath test: A Q&A with Jon Ronson

Well that's the thing. The most miserable three months of my life was before the financial meltdown. I was commissioned to write a book about credit cards. I'd written a piece about a man called Richard Cullen, who committed suicide because he was out of his depth in credit cards. And so I was going into the areas of, "Is this all a house of cards? Are people too enthralled by the sub-prime market?" My publisher keeps reminding me, that if I had gone through with the book, it would have come out just then.

But I spent three or four months trying to make [the premise] interesting. All the people who worked in the credit industry, all the people I was meeting, who were so important and so controlling over the way we live our lives -- and history proved that some of them were doing really nefarious things. It was probably a weakness of mine, but I just couldn't find a way to make it interesting. They weren't colorful characters. And so that line in the book really was wrenched from my heart. I gave up writing the book. I did say this to my publisher the other day, but in a way The Psychopath Test is the book that I didn't write. It is the credit book in a way.

But yeah, what can I say? In the three or four months I went around meeting list brokers and heads of banks and hedge fund people, I couldn't find a single person who lit the page up. And I completely understand the sort of moral problems of what I just said. It's just the truth of it.



"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 07:22:43 AM EST
So, two weeks ago David Cameron stated that he would not reveal the contents of a load of texts exchanged between himself and Rebekah Brooks, Murdoch's primary hench-person.

Now a few of them have begun to leak and, we are now promised, that some of the others are very revealing of the extent to which the British govt was run to suit the aims of News International

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 12:45:34 PM EST
Aside from that, the papers are all about the US elections.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 12:46:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I cannot wait for this election to be over.
I keep meaning to write a diary comparing the US elections to the medieval pilgrimage circuit, but the whole thing is just too much.
by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 01:32:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Can't argue with that, but 2014 mid-terms begin on nov 7th and some of the candidates for 2016 re already jostling for position

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 01:42:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Lots of tease, but nothing dynamite revealed so far - very annoying.
by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 01:31:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
well it was a non-story really, the most interesting bits were the bits you can work out from them, rather than the messages themselves.

firstly there are only five sources for these emails,  the first one we can almost certainly rule out, and that's David cameron and Number 10. you would think them being the source is something that there is a vanishingly small chance of happening. The second possibility is Rebekah herself , but according to her evidence given at the Leveson Inquiry she only has six weeks of messages and the time for that doesnt match with the content of the messages. The third  option is that the police have been leaking to the Mail, but if that was the case, you would think that the re would be much more than just the two relatively innocuous text messages. The fourth source would be the leveson inquiry itself, and if someone from there was to do the leaking you'd think that similarly to the police, firstly they would leak more, and secondly it would be a risk that might damage the inquirys process.

This leaves one possibilty as being most likely, that News International is leaking its employees emails to The Mail as part of the ongoing campaign against media regulation, a sort of  "We know what is in the rest, and we're willing to leak them, You wouldn't want your premiership to get damaged" gangster style threat.

So I know which my choice would be, but your own personal measure of who holds the lead piping in the Library may vary.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 05:05:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
David Cameron acknowledges there may be more Rebekah Brooks texts | Politics | The Guardian

David Cameron has acknowledged in private that he may be sitting on a further cache of emails and texts to and from Rebekah Brooks after a highly selective search was carried out for the Leveson inquiry.

The prime minister faced fresh embarrassment over his links with the former News International chief executive as it emerged that only a handful of his communications were searched for the inquiry, set up after the phone hacking scandal.

Cameron's aides looked only for emails and texts related to two specific areas highlighted by the inquiry - News International and BSkyB.

The prime minister believes it is wrong of critics, such as the former Labour Europe minister Chris Bryant, to say that he is sitting on a secret cache of communications because any emails and texts uncovered in the search were handed to the inquiry. But he acknowledges that a wider search may yield more texts and emails between the two.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 05:12:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
good reasoning

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 05:20:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
well an interesting point is that then news Internationals new management would be in breach of the data protection act, you'd think they would have put illegality behind them

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 05:24:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Did anyone catch the weird happening at the Guardian today wrt Iran?  I woke up to a story there about Iran suspending uranium enrichment before talks with the USA this week, which both sides had denied.  Later, the Guardian changed the story to say that the Iranians denied this and that it was an error in translation, or some sort of problem to that effect.  Very odd.  
by stevesim on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 01:58:11 PM EST
Given the situation, where there is obviously some sort of negotiation going on behind the scenes, I imagine there's a lot of disinformation, bluff and counter-bluff going on, not just between the involved parties, but also to throw the media off the scent.

I'm reminded of the SALT II talks where the media liaison said, "those who know, won't talk. Those who talk, don't know"


keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 02:27:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think you hit the nail on the head there.
by stevesim on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 02:28:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
2 really important articles I don't think I have time to diary:

Economists: Things We Are Ignorant About | The Big Picture

To quote  Edward Hadas, "Policymakers and pundits still make confident pronouncements, but the conclusions are radically different. The expert disagreements give away the truth: ignorance reigns."

Hadas identifies six questions which professionals should stop pretending they can answer:

1) What creates retail inflation?
2) How do financial asset prices affect the real economy?
3) Do big fiscal deficits damage the economy?
4) What does quantitative easing actually do?
5) How much leverage is too much?
6) How to deleverage without damaging the economy?

If economists cannot explain the basic workings of the economy, perhaps we should be relying on them much less for policy advice . . .

A Capitalist's Dilemma, Whoever Wins the Election - NYTimes.com

It's a paradox, and at its nexus is what I'll call the Doctrine of New Finance, which is taught with increasingly religious zeal by economists, and at times even by business professors like me who have failed to challenge it. This doctrine embraces measures of profitability that guide capitalists away from investments that can create real economic growth.

...

 The Doctrine of New Finance helped create this situation. The Republican intellectual George F. Gilder taught us that we should husband resources that are scarce and costly, but can waste resources that are abundant and cheap. When the doctrine emerged in stages between the 1930s and the `50s, capital was relatively scarce in our economy. So we taught our students how to magnify every dollar put into a company, to get the most revenue and profit per dollar of capital deployed. To measure the efficiency of doing this, we redefined profit not as dollars, yen or renminbi, but as ratios like RONA (return on net assets), ROCE (return on capital employed) and I.R.R. (internal rate of return).

Before these new measures, executives and investors used crude concepts like "tons of cash" to describe profitability. The new measures are fractions and give executives more options: They can innovate to add to the numerator of the RONA ratio, but they can also drive down the denominator by driving assets off the balance sheet -- through outsourcing. Both routes drive up RONA and ROCE.

Similarly, I.R.R. gives investors more options. It goes up when the time horizon is short. So instead of investing in empowering innovations that pay off in five to eight years, investors can find higher internal rates of return by investing exclusively in quick wins in sustaining and efficiency innovations.

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 02:24:58 PM EST
Short answer: Edward Hadas should look beyond monetarism and neoclassical economics.

Long answer: maybe I should write a diary.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 02:40:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Robert Vienneau: The Historical Failure of Neoclassical Economics (NOVEMBER 03, 2012)
Economists have developed a logically consistent and empirically applicable theory of classical `natural prices' (also known as Marxian `prices of production)'. As I and others have repetitively demonstrated, such prices are inconsistent with supply and demand-based reasoning. Since the endowment of means of production is not taken as given in such theories, these theories are not about the allocation of given resources among alternative ends.

Over, the last century economists have extensively explored the logic of models in which given resources are allocated among alternative ends. Although such models might be of use to a central planner, they seem to be unable to describe prices in actually existing capitalist economies.

The development of these claims have been available in the scholarly literature for about a third of a century. They have not been refuted. Most mainstream economists just ignore this collapse of neoclassical economics, in their teaching, in their applied work, in policy advice, and in their research.



I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 03:00:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The Economist: Inflation, QE and forcing the banks to lend (November 1st, 2012)
Mr Goodhart has lots of other interesting things to say about monetary policy. He thinks quantitative easing is "largely a spent force" and says it has failed to boost bank lending. By way of illustration, in Britain, the monetary base is 334% higher than it was six years ago, reserves at the central bank are 909% higher but broad money is only up 47% and bank lending to the private sector has risen just 31%, In other words, the money multiplier has collapsed.
The money multiplier is an ex-post-facto quantity, not a parameter of an actually operating process of money creation, so...
Then there is the idea of making the interest rate negative on excess reserves held at the central bank. Mr Goodhart seems to think this is a sensible idea although it might simply lead commercial banks to hold government bonds instead, rather than boost bank lending.
If that were done in the Eurozone, it would put an end to the government debt crisis, as banks wanting to hold government bonds would lower yields.
If the developed world economy continues to be sluggish, central bank minds may turn in these directions (cancelling government debt is another option). We have moved a long way from just shifting interest rates up and down by a quarter of a point.
Yeah, you may need real economists and bankers at central banks, not the kind of base rate tweakers we've had so far.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 03:14:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
IMO the profit margins in the FIRE sector are unrealistic and unsustainable over the long term.  

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 03:25:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
f economists cannot explain the basic workings of the economy, perhaps we should be relying on them much less for policy advice...
I
An unthinkably radical idea: Perhaps we should seek out and listen to economists who CAN explain the basic workings of the economy!

After all they do exist.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 03:16:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
First you'd need to be aware that they exist.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 03:17:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You're a dangerous thinker

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 03:20:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Krugman blog: Math Is Hard (November 4, 2012)
This shouldn't even be controversial, but of course it is. Partly that's because it's news some people don't want to hear. But I think there's also a math-is-hard problem: a political universe in which there are lots and lots of polls seems to play into some natural failings of our mathematical intuition.

First of all, from what I can see a lot of people have trouble with the distinction between probabilities and vote margins. They think that when I say, "state level polls overwhelmingly suggest an Obama victory", I'm also saying "state level polls suggest an overwhelming Obama victory", which isn't at all the same thing. We have a lot of polls, almost all of which say that Obama will win Ohio; but they don't by any means say that he'll win it in a landslide.

Second, people clearly have a problem with randomness -- with the fact that any poll, no matter how carefully conducted, has a margin of error. (And the true margins of error are surely larger than the statistical measure always reported, since sampling error isn't the only way a poll can go wrong). Specifically, what I think people don't get is the fact that when there are many polls of a state, some of them are bound to be outliers -- not, or not necessarily, because the pollsters have done a bad job, but because there's always noise in any sampling procedure.

...

Oh, and a third point: those margins of error are for any one poll. An average of many polls will have a much smaller standard error. Don't say, hey, Obama may have a three-point lead, but that's within the margin of error; as Pollster points out, the odds that this is a true Obama lead are 99 percent.



I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 03:25:09 PM EST
on Paper.li

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 03:48:11 PM EST
But ...

It's in foreign!

How do you expect people to read it?

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 03:51:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I believe you can feed the url through google garble...

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 05:24:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh, but you can't - Google FAIL™ as it interprets that the page is already in unforeign.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 05:30:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Cool! So how does it work, do you pick each item individually or do you subscribe to feeds or what?

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!
by A swedish kind of death on Mon Nov 5th, 2012 at 03:51:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You can make it feed off your twitter or facebook account, and it automatically composes the paper for you with a set periodicity. You can select sources among your twitter lists, saved searches, etc. You could have it follow particuler tags or accounts, etc. And when the new edition posts you can switch to 'editing Mode' and move items around if you want a different emphasis.

I decided to experiment with it and I think it could speed up the composition of our daily 'salon'.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Nov 5th, 2012 at 04:03:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Making the eurozone fit for the challenges of the 1990s | A Fistful Of Euros

The fascinating thing here is, of course, that nothing has changed. In many ways, this is because the issues haven't changed. Keynes said that the whole complex problem of European currencies and trade in the 1920s could be reduced to one question: how much of France's war debts would be paid by workers and how much by savers, whether through taxation or through inflation. The answer would set the price level and hence the exchange rate, and how much of a trade surplus Germany could run, and therefore how much of Germany's war debts could possibly be paid.

Similarly, in 1992 the questions was how the costs of German reunification would be split. Taxation was chosen over inflation, capital was privileged over income. Now, arguably, the question is how the cost of the Great Bubble will be split, and you guessed it. Portes is damning on the reasoning behind this:

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 04:15:40 PM EST
I forgot the best bit from this article:

Making the eurozone fit for the challenges of the 1990s | A Fistful Of Euros

Meanwhile, Migeru from the collectif antilibérale has an excellent column taking a sector-balance approach.
by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 04:26:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
ROFL, EuroTrib is now the collectif antilibérale?

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 05:26:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
TYR should know...
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 05:40:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Wheres my "collectif antilibérale" badge

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 05:52:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
We should make t-shirts: "proud member of the Col.lectif Antilibérale"

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 06:02:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Twitter / BuzzFeedAndrew: MT @DanTheDaily source familiar ...
MT @DanTheDaily source familiar w/RNC acknowledged main reason they really bought in PA is they couldn't spend anywhere else. airwaves full.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 05:51:06 PM EST
Disasters appear to be Romneys thing

Romney's Pennsylvania Fantasy Turns into Disaster | Democrats.org

If this state was in play (it wasn't!), it ain't now.

Michael Barbaro ‏@mikiebarb
"We've got to get out! My daughter is frostbitten," begs mom, asking to leave Romney rally. Staffer replies: "It's not cold enuf for that."

Sabrina Siddiqui ‏@SabrinaSiddiqui
. @JFKucinich is live tweeting more about the frustrated folks wanting to leave Romney rally.

Jackie Kucinich ‏@JFKucinich
People are literally streaming through the gates - Romney still speaking.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 08:33:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Anyone here have any solutions for typing Spanish characters on a US keyboard? I was thinking of a widget that sits in a corner when I want it that I can click on, but my google-fu isn't coming up with much.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 07:55:28 PM EST
OS?


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 08:34:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
on windows, go to your control panel ,chose the keyboard options and add a spanish keyboard, then from the start button get the on screen keybord up

you should be able to switch between the two keyboards by pressing shift + alt, clicking on the correct character on the OSC (or using it as a map for your normal one) then shift and alting back to the original

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Nov 4th, 2012 at 08:42:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Get a mac.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Nov 5th, 2012 at 04:03:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
ick.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Mon Nov 5th, 2012 at 07:05:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ari Jokimäki has a link collection here.

Frankly I think it's Big Placebo again... just like electricity sensitivity, mobile phones, and what not. Silly human beings. Hmm... was this Maine study a double blind one? ;-)

by mustakissa on Tue Nov 6th, 2012 at 10:08:42 AM EST
Papers on wind turbine noise « AGW Observer
Wind farms are unique sound sources and exhibit special audible and inaudible characteristics that can be described as modulating sound or as a tonal complex. Wind farm compliance measures based on a specified noise number alone will fail to address problems with noise nuisance.

Hmm. Looks like wind farms ought to employ a sound designer. I'm not being flippant. Tune it right, it could be a plus, not a minus.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Tue Nov 6th, 2012 at 10:23:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Interesting thought.
Car manufacturers spend time of getting the right sound at the right time, from the engine to closing doors - a BMW being designed to sound "solid" or "like a safe".

(I must not be very manly: I'd prefer a car to be quiet.)

Will we get stratification and snobbism based on turbine/blade sound?
"I dunno, I was hoping for more of a solid Euro/Danish sound. This one's a bit Chinese, you know, slightly tinny."

-----
sapere aude

by Number 6 on Tue Nov 6th, 2012 at 10:48:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]


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