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Weekend Open Thread

by afew Sat Dec 1st, 2012 at 12:09:52 PM EST

For open weekends


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Or open-ended weeks.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Dec 1st, 2012 at 12:10:15 PM EST
If anyone can get BBC iPlayer, this is a good story about the night in 1973 when Keith moon passed out on stage and a guy in the audience stood in.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Dec 1st, 2012 at 01:10:44 PM EST
After last night, I'm having a gentle night in.

I went to the brewery tap for one of the places I volunteer at. The brewer came over to say I was needed next week and said "when can you come in ?".
So, like an idiot I said "well, when do you need me ?"

So the next thing is I'm agreeing to an 8:00 start which will require me leaving home around 6:30. {s i g h}

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Dec 1st, 2012 at 01:17:35 PM EST
Lean this way so I can knock you up the side of the head! But then, it's a good thing that you're doing.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Sat Dec 1st, 2012 at 01:31:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Owwwww !!

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Dec 2nd, 2012 at 03:51:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
by minuscle on Sat Dec 1st, 2012 at 01:31:28 PM EST
Good for her, going to the source here. that's good research, I wonder if JaP steered her in the direction of that article or if she found it herself.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Dec 1st, 2012 at 01:41:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thanks; I really enjoyed this article and shared it on Facebook with a mention for Jerome, too.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Sat Dec 1st, 2012 at 01:49:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thanks for the tip-off, minuscle!
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Dec 2nd, 2012 at 04:53:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
thanks. Good quote, too.

Wind power
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Sun Dec 2nd, 2012 at 04:55:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Where do electric trains get their electricity? I mean, for example, if you have a HSR line, how separated it is from the surrounding community? I know that some streetcar systems have their own power generating and distribution systems (you can still ride the subway in Boston even if the city power is blacked out--or could in the 1970s at least), but how does it work for those long distance cross country lines?

  • Generation separate and dedicated?
  • Distribution separated?
  • Ownership of infrastructure and energy sourcing?

Or do your lights dim when the train goes past...
by asdf on Sat Dec 1st, 2012 at 01:46:33 PM EST
AFAIK, SNCF in France has its own supply infrastructure: they actually have different voltages, depending on the network (my commuter train actually switches between 1500 V DC and 25 KV AC mid-way to my destination).

The HSR "LGV" lines use 25 KV AC to power the TGV trains and the distribution network is running parallel to the tracks. They have power transformation stations at regular intervals: they get power from the grid as 3-phase AC at something like 63 KV to 200 KV and transform it to single phase 25 KV AC. Don't know what kind of contract they have, but I've read they pay a heck of an electricity bill...

by Bernard on Sat Dec 1st, 2012 at 03:41:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Trains run regularly following a known-in-advance timetable, so planning for the demand should be no problem for system operators. No reason for the lights to dim when the train goes past...
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 02:59:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Riki Ott: Unfinished business: The unspoken link between dispersants and sick children in the Gulf of Mexico // Current TV
The Creppels live in Boothville, La., in south Plaquemines Parrish. Area health clinics and hospitals are experiencing an influx of sick children for treatment for a range of symptoms that began after the BP oil disaster. The increase in numbers of sick children coincides with the massive spraying of toxic chemical dispersants into the water and air that began in 2010. More troubling is the fact that the children are still having these symptoms to this day.

The Corexit dispersants used in the Gulf are known human health hazards, causing eye and skin irritation, respiratory problems, harm to liver, kidney, and blood cells, injury and even death to unborn babies, immune suppression, skin disorders, and more.

Not surprisingly, the symptoms Julie's children suffer are epidemic across the Gulf states that were impacted by the BP disaster -- and the secondary disaster, the widespread use of Nalco's Corexit dispersants. Most medical doctors in the Gulf have continuously treated the sick with standard drugs used for infections and viruses. Nasonex. Citirizine. DryMax. Azithromycin. Zofran. Cefdinir. Xopenex. Amoxicilin. Flovent. Suprax. Viravan-P. Albuterol. Cefixime. Ichitha ointment. Budesonide. And more.

those darn externalities again...

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sat Dec 1st, 2012 at 01:56:20 PM EST
"Quiet tonight."

"Too quiet, Carruthers."

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Sat Dec 1st, 2012 at 03:28:44 PM EST
Yea, but that happens.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Dec 1st, 2012 at 03:54:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
the last few days i've had a much harder time finding something interesting to read on the internet.

since it's the first time i have felt that way since 2004, i wonder if it's me changing or that the internet is 'quiet', maybe because of obama's election being over, a calm after a storm, or a calm before another...

i guess novelty comes in waves, like everything else...

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sat Dec 1st, 2012 at 05:31:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's an opportunity to explore!

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Sat Dec 1st, 2012 at 05:47:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
yup i found some new haunts, already heh.

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sat Dec 1st, 2012 at 07:02:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Re-reading Koestler's Ghost in the Machine. Very productive.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Sat Dec 1st, 2012 at 03:29:59 PM EST
ceebs has a diary on orange and I just wanted to post that he's missed a possibility; namely that the Met police are still running cover for Murdoch's activities in the US. They're not investigating cos they know where that goes.

so they're just kicking it into the grass

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Dec 1st, 2012 at 05:03:03 PM EST
@MigeruBlogger
Migeru Shimbun is out! http://paper.li/MigeruBlogger/1351816577 ... ▸ Top stories today via @MigeruBlogger


I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Dec 1st, 2012 at 05:18:37 PM EST
Daily Beast: Hitler's Strange Afterlife in India (November 30, 2012)
... Of 25 students in the class, 9 picked Adolf Hitler, making him easily the highest vote-getter in this particular exercise; a certain Mohandas Gandhi was the choice of precisely one student. Discussing the idea of courage with other students once, my wife was startled by the contempt they had for Gandhi. "He was a coward!" they said. And as far back as 2002, the Times of India reported a survey that found that 17 percent of students in elite Indian colleges "favored Adolf Hitler as the kind of leader India ought to have."

...

Still, why Hitler? "He was a fantastic orator," said the 10th-grade kids. "He loved his country; he was a great patriot. He gave back to Germany a sense of pride they had lost after the Treaty of Versailles," they said.

"And what about the millions he murdered?" asked my wife. "Oh, yes, that was bad," said the kids. "But you know what, some of them were traitors."




I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Dec 1st, 2012 at 05:24:38 PM EST
The far right are very good at rewriting history.

Bal Thackery was a really skilled demagogue, exploiting poverty and resentment for his own ends. His ends were ethnic cleansing of Muslims in India. They were well served by promoting Hitler's writings to legitimise the notion.

I'm sure we'll see more of this kind of thing in the EU too.

Worth recognising that for most Indians, WW2 and associated atrocities in Europe are very far away. Geographically, historically, other things were going on.

And as for Gandhi, he was part of a multifaceted push to freedom, that included plenty committed to other forms of struggle - e.g.:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subhas_Chandra_Bose

Finally of course, for India, the "Allies" were basically the enemy, so just as Bose sought support from Japan, so Indians have a memory of Hitler as the enemy of their enemy.

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Sun Dec 2nd, 2012 at 06:34:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Paraphrasing Gandhi, it looks like Indian civilisation would be a good idea, too... :P

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Dec 2nd, 2012 at 09:21:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Absolutely... India is going through the migrations of the industrial revolution and that is putting huge stresses on society and opening up all sorts of exploitation...
by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Sun Dec 2nd, 2012 at 01:41:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Watching the 1958 "Earth vs. the Flying Saucers". Great cars (white walls), death rays blowing up ships, scientists getting laid (ah, the good old days).

The good news ... it's only a life sentence. You eventually leave this planet of idiots.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Sat Dec 1st, 2012 at 05:32:43 PM EST
That's a good one,
by Zwackus on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 08:35:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]

I bring this to your attention without commendation, merely as a social fragment from Finland today. The song is called 'Shit Happens'.

Do not, under any circumstances, watch any other X-Pulssion videos without medical advice.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Sat Dec 1st, 2012 at 06:01:34 PM EST
Madam Miaow Says
Alfred Harmsworth launched the Daily Mirror as a paper by women for women (hence the name!) but, when it didn't work, the lady journos were sacked. The new editor, Hamilton Fyfe, said it was "like drowning kittens". He turned it into the first picture tabloid and it became a runaway success.

Such influence in the press by one man and his brother was unprecedented. Then along came Beaverbrook.

Already owning the London Evening Standard, Anglo-Canadian tycoon Max Aitken, Lord Beaverbrook, acquired the Daily Express in 1916. He was said to have operated a blacklist of famous people who had offended him including Sir Thomas Beecham, Paul Robeson, Haile Selassie, and Noël Coward. He was awful but at least he didn't support Hitler like the Daily Mail proprietor, Rothermere. Rather, Beaverbrook's papers were an important arm of Britain's war machine, shaping and disseminating government propaganda during World War II.

The big three press barons of the first half of the 20th century, Northcliffe, Rothermere and Beaverbrook, were all very right-wing, though otherwise very different. Northcliffe was originally a Liberal Unionist, fanatically jingoistic and pro-Empire. Unlike his brother Rothermere, a fascistic bean-counter who supported Hitler, Northcliffe hired a range of talented writers from Rudyard Kipling to inter-war pacifist Norman Angell.


"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sat Dec 1st, 2012 at 06:21:15 PM EST
Stop The Spirit of Zossen

`Camp whores' (of both genders) are a well known sociological phenomenon. Yet these two did little more than play hostess at various functions. None are obviously stunningly attractive outside the Jersey Shore framework. But flaunt a lifestyle vastly beyond their means. Something else must explain their extraordinary access. It's not about Petraeus or Allen individually, but a systemic phenomenon.

Reports now indicate that Petraeus used to arrive at Kelley's parties in military motorcade with 28 Tampa police as escorts. Kelley in return offered expensive cigars, bottle service and musical serenades. It's corrupt from both sides. Why does CENTCOM condone this?

Kelley tried to get her house declared the other day a diplomatic mission because of a flimsy volunteer certificate bestowing the awesome title of `Honorary Ambassader' [for cheese whiz, or the like]. This is the person who trades personal emails with the Titans of CENTCOM? She has those bona fides. Besides 30,000 pages of emails with General Allen. Her intimacy with Allen involves flying up from Tampa to see him in Washington, D.C. Evidence suggests she had some similar access to Petraeus.

A foreign intelligence service couldn't design a more useful penetration of Imperial Viceroys. Especially when Jill Kelley is millions in debt and fighting foreclosure and her sister, she of the court order, just declared $3.5 MM bankruptcy. There are a dozen intelligence services that would toss some coin for their access and then guided/targeted collection efforts.

Apparently, to penetrate an American Viceroy you just need some decent tits a good profile, cigars, a foreclosed Mercedes, ruthless self-promotion and South Philly/Jersey shore moxi. The Chinese might well be dumbfounded at the ease and minimal funds involved.

The Affair and Petraeus

Quick thoughts. We're somewhat sympathetic to both original `sinners.' Everyone probably knows an ex that did not take a breakup well (or been that ex). Sure, she pursued him. He was the alpha male in a system based on latent crypto-homoerotic glorification of the top dog. He made the mistake. To sociological analysis noting the affair began 2 months at CIA without his accustomed staff, etc. we repeat the above: he made the mistake. Full stop.



"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sat Dec 1st, 2012 at 06:29:19 PM EST
The forecast is for -20 C tomorrow at 09.00 when I leave for Helsinki. That's going to be fun.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Sun Dec 2nd, 2012 at 01:43:47 PM EST
And Helsinki with those straight streets were the wind sweeps in from the sea.

I know you issues with them but grow up and do put on your long johns. A couple of layers of long johns and then warm and wind resistant pants and you are ready for anything. Well, provided you have shoes, coat, hat and gloves that are up to the challenge.

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!

by A swedish kind of death on Sun Dec 2nd, 2012 at 03:18:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Sadly that is true. I have to dig them out. But I did find a wonderful solution to chilly hands: silk undergloves! You can wear them under leather gloves, so that when you take the leathers off to get into your pocket for the mobile, you've still get a protective layer.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Sun Dec 2nd, 2012 at 03:45:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Actually, silk is really warm!  I was surprised to find that one when someone lent me a real silk "Mao" jacket on a "frigid" day.  It had silk stuffing as well.  Good stuff that!
by stevesim on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 11:41:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
pfft.  -20 is a warm day where I come from.  baby!  ;-)
by stevesim on Sun Dec 2nd, 2012 at 03:29:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
So how's the Gulag treating you these days?

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Sun Dec 2nd, 2012 at 03:46:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
pffft.  that's a DRY cold.  like a summer day.  it takes a real man to stand cold and humidity.  ;-p
by stevesim on Sun Dec 2nd, 2012 at 03:48:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
So how's Bradford treating you these days?

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Sun Dec 2nd, 2012 at 03:58:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
?

Bradford?  

Stay warm, and do wear a pair of longjohns.  

by stevesim on Sun Dec 2nd, 2012 at 04:13:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I am sorry Sven for my failed attempt at jocularity.

Stay warm-

by stevesim on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 11:40:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
To paraphrase the Antipodeans: "In longjohns, I will."

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 09:42:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
This is a year old, but rather interesting.

» The Great Shift in Japanese Pop Culture - Part Five:: Néojaponisme » Blog Archive

In the final installment of the series (Parts One, Two, Three, Four), we look at the export possibilities for Japanese culture when the "most popular" goods and works are increasingly being made by and for marginal subcultures without obvious analogs overseas.

Start from part one.

Basically it is about the consequences for japanese popular culture as the middle class is being shrunk.

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!

by A swedish kind of death on Sun Dec 2nd, 2012 at 03:11:49 PM EST
Middle class is shrinking everywhere.

UK used to lead the world in rock music and youth orientated culture, now kids just want to be famous so's Simon Cowell can get rich. Hardly anywhere does music legally these days, whatever there is stays underground and remains inconsequential

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Dec 2nd, 2012 at 03:43:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Got an Asus VivoTab RT with the new Windows.  Ting on it here.  Needs work on the software, but I'm fairly impressed.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sun Dec 2nd, 2012 at 03:15:19 PM EST
Or "typing" even.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sun Dec 2nd, 2012 at 03:16:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Wow. Round trip Salzburg to Venice on the train for 66 euros, including the seat reservation (2nd class.) And hopefully the scenery will be lovely in early January.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Sun Dec 2nd, 2012 at 05:11:40 PM EST
I hope you have a wonderful journey. Will you be staying in Venice for long?
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Sun Dec 2nd, 2012 at 05:45:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Naw, just meeting friends there on Jan 2, back home on Jan 4. I am curious to see what the weather will be like in Venice at that time of year. The only other time I went to Venice, Heinz and I drove down in October, 2011, and it snowed for much of the way!

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 03:16:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Suppose it's my cue to note that's about the same distance from Pie Town (aka "Nowhere") to Carlsbad (aka "Nowhere-With-a-Hole-in-the-Ground")  

(yippie-i-o-ki-a)

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Sun Dec 2nd, 2012 at 11:44:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
When? I may be there Jan 26 (round trip around 18 Euros)
by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 12:54:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You're price is lots better!

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 03:16:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Have lots of fun

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 01:13:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Download PDF.
by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 02:57:08 AM EST
972mag
Bibi: "E1."

Abbas: "You sunk my two-state solution!"

by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 06:01:23 AM EST
Greg LeMond : "Je suis prêt à être candidat à la présidence de l'UCI" Greg LeMond: "I am ready to be a candidate for the presidency of the UCI"
Depuis que l'Union cycliste internationale (UCI) a retiré à Lance Armstrong ses sept titres sur la Grande Boucle, Greg LeMond est redevenu le seul Américain vainqueur du Tour de France. Depuis lundi, l'ancien coureur de 51 ans incarne aussi une nouvelle voie pour le cyclisme. Réuni à Londres pendant quarante-huit heures à l'initiative du patron de l'équipementier Skins, Jaimie Fuller (Lire l'article Un sponsor mène la fronde contre l'UCI), le nouveau mouvement Change Cycling Now ("Changer le cyclisme maintenant") vient de plébisciter Greg LeMond pour incarner ce changement. Since the International Cycling Union (UCI) has annulled Lance Armstrong's seven victories on the Tour, Greg LeMond is again the only American winner of the Tour de France. Since Monday, the 51-year old racer also embodies a new approach to cycling. United in London for forty-eight hours on the initiative of the owner of equipment maker Skins, Jaimie Fuller (Read Article A sponsor leading the revolt against the UCI ), the new movement Change Cycling Now has just acclaimed Greg LeMond to embody this change.


It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 08:49:49 AM EST


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