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Monday Open Thread

by afew Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 11:35:42 AM EST

Monday evening on the dark days of the year


Display:
This is a Northern Hemisphere blog. Get over it already.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 11:36:24 AM EST
Not to get all metaphysical or anything, but I am a southern-hemisphere european. So I'll be sunny and cheerful if I want to.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 11:41:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Daily Kos: Bangladesh Hits 1 Million Solar Home Systems

A few months back Nancy Wimmer told us about Bangladesh's solar success. In one of the poorest countries on earth a renewable energy company, Grameen Shakti, is busy installing nearly 1,000 solar home systems each day. It turns out all that small solar has achieved something quite big. In November Grameen Shakti hit 1 Million Solar Home Systems (SHS) installed. The company's milestone reinforces a lesson that is increasingly clear. Whether it's Germany, the US, or even China distributed solar installations are driving the solar revolution.

The Bangladesh story however, is particularly exciting because Grameen has singlehandedly shattered the energy 'axioms' on which the international policy community has relied for decades: Renewable energy is too expensive: Wrong. Even if solar makes sense the poor can't afford it or they won't pay: Wrong. The grid will come regardless so off grid, decentralized energy is a waste of time, money, and effort: Wrong, wrong, wrong. What Bangladesh does prove is that Carl Pope is right: deploying solar makes the most sense for off-grid areas where the economics are compelling and the need is great.

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 11:49:59 AM EST
this warms my heart like you wouldn't believe...

thanks Fran!

HAPPY DANCE

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 02:36:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
To the physio to have some of the more urgent catastrophes in my legs attended to.

This time, my right ankle, which I broke very badly when I was 30 and in which I have restricted mobility. Ive been suffering bad tendonitis for the last 6 months and have been forced to use a walking stick pretty much anytime I want to walk a km or so.

It turns out, under examination, that the problem stems from the muscles in my quad (lower thigh) which have tightened up to help stabilize my right knee (snapped anterior cruciate ligament) which I'd done 10 years previously.

So I have to do a lot of work on that, which will involve pain and oaths, before we can even begin to look at the ankle.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 12:04:53 PM EST
I know, I know. Me and the silver-topped stick are good friends. Today I really need it, but usually I can walk down to the bus (1 km) without physical support. However I must admit to having developed a behavioural reliance on it. The reasons are partly aesthetic: an artistic gentlemen strolling on the cobbles of the ancient city where the Diet of Porvoo took place harbinging the emergence of an independent Finland: partly physical: when you stop to talk to people you can have a lean on it. Also aesthetically poses are enabled; the right kind of respect is installed in all you meet, and then there's the very enjoyable occurrence of giving your seat to a lady. In Finland, chivalry went long ago along with the growth of greater gender work equality, so any display of it is rare. (though in the words of the late great Samuel Johnson, when originally referring to woman preachers, "like a dog's walking on his hinder legs. It is not done well; but you are surprised to find it done at all.")

It's also a weapon, should the need arise.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 12:42:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I often take it when I'm using a plane as I've found there's a 50% chance you'll get a free speedy boarding upgrade

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 01:25:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
really?  I would think think they would confiscate something like that for security reasons.
by stevesim on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 01:27:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah, no, mine's a lightweight one incapable of being used as a weapon


keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 01:36:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
you mean like this?

http://www.swordsdirect.com/sword_canes.html

hee hee

I am evil.

by stevesim on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 02:58:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Unlike nail clippers?
by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 03:01:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, you are allowed to bring baby formula on board, because it - but no other fluids - can not be used to mask a James Bond villains fluid bomb. And you may buy glass bottles in the tax free, because those can not be turned to weapons more deadly then a toe-nail clipper.

The rules are nutty.

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!

by A swedish kind of death on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 03:54:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
So you'd think, but on the last flight I took, my place on a row by an exit was a plus rather than minus. She understood my need to stretch the leg. But it doesn't work if you look in pain or crotchety - you have to have a smile and a pleasantry to offer. It's a very old bit of salesmanship: "I can smile in spite of the challenges of life, what about you?."A dialogue strategy evolved by beggars, possibly.

But it doesn't work on bankers.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 01:40:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
does yours have a hidden flask inside though?

http://www.fashionablecanes.com/flask-canes.html

by stevesim on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 01:45:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Only in my mind...

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 01:50:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ask them about ultrasound therapy, and if you can afford it, look into buying this Novasonic vibration thingie.

http://www.novasonic-therapy.co.uk/

It is not ultrasonic, but a very good replica thereof, as you can only use ultrasonic very sparsely.  it really, really helped me and others I have recommended it to.

by stevesim on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 12:53:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I should tell you that I have a masters in biomedical engineering and spent a lot of time studying the mechanical properties of tendons.
by stevesim on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 01:32:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah, yes. I looked at it and wondered exactly how much use I'd get from it. I have a massage thingy and will make do with that

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 01:37:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Regular massage can help a lot too.

I hope your recent work hasn't exacerbated your problems.

by stevesim on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 01:42:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Haha, Physical Torture they call it. (Really Physical Therapy.) When I badly sprained my ankle a few years ago, ripping things to shreds from one side to the other, the doc said that if I was religious about the PT then I would not be an "ankle cripple." I thought that sort of language was verboten, but it did scare me into a LOT of therapy sessions...
by asdf on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 01:53:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Damasio proven accurate, yet again.

"Grab 'em by the Limbic and their rostral frontal lobe will follow."

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 02:08:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The difference between late June and early October in the condition of my back after physical therapy made me a believer.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 07:29:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, moving round so much and standing up all day didn't do the tendonitis any good.

But against that, the regular exercise noticeably improved my fitness, which I regard as a plus. I'm generally far too sedentary, sitting here on ET posting nonsense, for my own good. I used to cycle and walk a fair bit, even a year ago, but it's fallen away this year given my various problems and I'm very unfit. I think this very lack of exercise is partly responsible for the ankle problems I now have as the muscle condition has gone.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 02:39:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well Helen, you know I am a fan of Yoga, so I can warmly recommend it, of course gently done to start with.

It's this week two years since I broken my knee-cap and my movement is back to almost normal, so there is still some way to go.

Because of the two spinal anaesthesias I lost, despite the Yoga, quite a bit of the muscle tone in the pelvis. So after searching I found T-Tapp. At first I couldn't believe it, it sounded to good to be true, but it helped me build up the muscles again, and it brought additional relieve to my knee. Teresa Tapp developed the system to relieve her own back pain and one of the great side effects was the slimming down. I think this system could be helpful for you. And you can first buy the book, which is not to expensive - I think it is even available as ebook.

There are a few sample exercises on her website and plenty of stories.

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 02:23:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oopps - Fran:
It's this week two years since I broken my knee-cap and my movement is back to almost normal, so there is still some way to go.

I meant to add, that I believe that my knee is back to almost normal because of Yoga.

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 02:30:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I specifically asked about yoga and was warned against it until my problems have been addressed.

the mobility in my knees and ankles is so restricted that I cannot do basic moves, I cannot sit cross legged or kneel down. Plus my left knee is a complete disaster on its own and needs a separate set of treatments

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 02:43:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You don't have to sit cross legged on the floor or kneel down. You could to many exercises on a chair. After the operation I was not allowed to bend my knee for almost two months, so I adjusted the movement and did some of them on the bed.

Maybe you can find a Yoga teacher that can help you adjust the movements to your personal needs.

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 02:47:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
not every yoga teacher is so gentle and body aware as your good self.

I bought a special yoga video for old people with restricted movement and straight out of the gate it required kneeling. Gah !!!

I'll wait till my more immediate issues are addressed before I get wiggy with yoga

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 03:32:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You would make a lousy Catholic.
by stevesim on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 03:38:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Afraid of further damage, my legs re really fragile. One moment's exercise of indulgence could leave me up the creek for months or years

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 04:25:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Martin Luther also had problems with indulgences.
by stevesim on Tue Dec 18th, 2012 at 05:39:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I thought yoga could make a turnip gentle and body aware, and you tell me it doesn't even work on yoga teachers...

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 03:40:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=feldenkrais&page=&utm_source=opensearch

ever heard of Feldenkrais?

i did a course in it at Esalen in the 0's and found it to be amazingly gentle and respectful, sensitive enough to use on a new born baby or a centenarian.

there is a form of massage called Trager which is also very gentle, with surprising results...(in a good way, lol).

sorry to hear of your discomfort, and hoping you find relief soon.

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 04:48:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I checked out feldenkrais last year; sadly there isn't anything within 2 hours of me

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 05:18:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The approaching end of the world doesn't seem to phase any of you.
by stevesim on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 12:50:11 PM EST
I leave for  Vienna  in a few days. Evrything happens there 10 years leter.
by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 12:52:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Plus, we've already passed the date in question, since the calendar upon which the myth relies was developed prior to leap years.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 01:02:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
So are you saying that the world has already ended?
by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 01:18:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Indeed.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 01:22:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
but not yet in Vienna.
by stevesim on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 01:27:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That would explain a lot.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 01:23:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Nonsense, the Mayan calendar counts days in well-defined cycles. If you change the Western calendar from Julian to Gregorian you just change the Western labels on the Mayan dates.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 02:09:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Does that mean that the world hasn't ended?

The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman
by dvx (dvx.clt t gmail dotcom) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 04:23:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The world has ended.  Filling out, getting signatures, and filing the paperwork will take some time yet.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 04:27:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No. It only means that the world ended independently of the prophesy.
by Katrin on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 04:28:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And here I never even noticed.

I am just SO embarrassed!

The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman

by dvx (dvx.clt t gmail dotcom) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 04:46:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
haha, like the dead people in '6 ft under' who didn't even know it, lol.

great show...

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 05:37:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
So the "extra day" every four years, invented after the existence of the Mayan calendar, DIDN'T have the effect I read about? I've been spreading lots of disinformation, dammit.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 11:23:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The extra day didn't change the fact that winter solstace is on, er, winter solstace. The Mayans didn't use the Christian calendar anyway. And they didn't foresee the date of the end of their own civilisation, so I wouldn't overrate what they said about the date of the end of the world.
by Katrin on Tue Dec 18th, 2012 at 02:08:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yep, this has definitely been a "doh!" moment for me.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Tue Dec 18th, 2012 at 08:51:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
They also said nothing about the end of the world.

Does the Gregorian calendar predict the end of the world at the end of every 400 years just because the perpetual calendar repeats every 400 years?

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Dec 18th, 2012 at 08:57:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The ratio of the solar year (365 days and a bit) to the Tzolkin 260-day cycle is 1 + 1/sqrt(6)

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Dec 18th, 2012 at 09:32:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Actually it's not till Spring, but in any case it's only a reset on a repeating set of patterns with a periodic frequency of 52 millennia.

It's like the 52.000 service on a 3 year old car. The car won't stop dead on the expiry date, but it's worth checking the oil.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 04:47:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's running out! It's the End of the World as We ...

oh.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Tue Dec 18th, 2012 at 08:53:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
whatever happens, this will be the soundtrack



keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 01:20:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It will be a relief, considering the current world situation. A few minutes of fiery hell, then ascension into Heaven...
by asdf on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 02:01:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
i would say it is phasing us but not  ~so far~ fazing us.

i have been expecting this since 1975 through sheer intuition that this system could not stand, bereft as it is of true emotional intelligence.

the waste of intelligence and humanity, the despoliation of the environment for cheap thrills (that are anything but), and the sacrifice of so much of what is best in our nature in order to better climb the greasy pole of 'success' are all condemning factors in why this system must change or die, or both.

perhaps it is better that it continues to crumble from its own inner rot than getting pushed over by 'subjects', as change is more likely to stick without need for force ~and inevitable subsequent backlash.

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 04:58:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 11:33:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Recent events here, and the ensuring discussion (read: Shouting Match & Hysteria,) has made me recall to mind a fundamental Scientific Skeptical insight: something necessarily True is not necessarily Accurate.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 01:59:33 PM EST
interesting... does that mean you could have a Lie that is Accurate?

similar cerebro-sensations reading your post as from reading Ronald Laing's 'Knots'.

fun in small doses.

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 02:42:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The logical opposite of Truth is False.  "Lying," as such, isn't a concern of Logic; not even a concern, as such, of Critical Thinking.  

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 03:23:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
So where do we put fiction?

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 04:48:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
on the 'pre-911' shelf?

picasso said "Art is the lie that tells the truth"

i guess bad art tells the truthiness.

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 05:40:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Thus Picasso demonstrated that he was a better artist than a philosopher :-) Art is not a "lie" - unless someone is trying to pass off a fake as a genuine Picasso for example. There isn't an intention to deceive - a basic component of lying - not even when there is a great distortion of anatomy or perspective. The artist is usually trying to honestly express something or reveal something and uses various means to do so, including distortion of naturalistic appearances.

Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.
by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 05:58:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
File it under Art, I suppose.

Whether it is "Fine" or "Decorative" or "Something Else" Art I leave to those who ponder such things to ponder.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 07:31:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
you, sir, are picking my mind like a locksmith with these precisions.

i guess if a man thought he was telling a lie, and then what he said were later surprisingly revealed to be unwittingly Accurate, the the supposition could be said to be true.

thus spake zeno


"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 05:08:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Lying involves saying something false (or a misleading truth) AND intending to deceive or mislead. So in such a case one would say that he intended to deceive but in fact what he said was (unknown to him) true. That is he tried to lie but his lying intention was foiled by the facts.

Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.
by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 06:04:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Krugman blog: Something (Everything) Rotten in the State of Macro (December 17, 2012)
Brad DeLong links to a blog post from 2011 about saltwater/freshwater and all that making some points I think I've also made, but maybe not that clearly. The key grafs:
The saltwater school, on the other hand, is having to reevaluate a great many of their ideas, not the least about collegiality and scientific epistemology. The recognition of the contempt in which their colleagues held them has to be a shock to many; I think I detect traces of it in Delong's writing, and in Prof. Krugman's. Likewise, the recognition that many freshwater economists were not thinking scientifically at all, but rather bound by prejudice and intellectual rigidity seems to have come as a shock. It is very much to Prof. Delong's credit that he is willing to consider these realities.

There is also a practical problem, if economics as a discipline is to survive. There is a huge amount of junk in the peer-reviewed economics literature-the reviewing process is no protection when the reviewers themselves are prejudiced. A comparison that comes to mind is the collapse of "scientific" eugenics. There were vast amounts of that written, and now it is only read as an object example of the capture of a social science by prejudice and authoritarianism. For economists, meantime, there is a huge task ahead: the garbage must be taken out; removed from the field's teaching, textbooks, and policy advice. It will be a generation at least before this is set right, if indeed it can be set right at all.

...

In fact, the freshwater side wasn't listening at all, as evidenced by the way 80-year-old fallacies cropped up as soon as an actual policy response to crisis was on the table; and as for changing views in response to facts, well, we all know how that has gone.



I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 03:12:08 PM EST
Migeru:
There is a huge amount of junk in the peer-reviewed economics literature-the reviewing process is no protection when the reviewers themselves are prejudiced. A comparison that comes to mind is the collapse of "scientific" eugenics. There were vast amounts of that written, and now it is only read as an object example of the capture of a social science by prejudice and authoritarianism

kinda sez it all really, such a profound insight.

where values of 'healthy' in eugenics are substituted for values of 'financial worth'.

power is inherently amoral.

without the virtue plugin it's an app that must crash its operating system (that's us folks)...

as for who defines virtue, ya got me there. i guess anything that diminishes pain to people and increases well-being.

the ultimate in fuzzy-topia...

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 05:21:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There is a huge amount of junk in the peer-reviewed economics literature-the reviewing process is no protection when the reviewers themselves are prejudiced.

The same appears to be true in most scientific fields these days, with the publish or perish mentality.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 05:41:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Migeru:
with the publish or perish mentality

Plus the hold of ideology, plus the commercial interests of research funders.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Dec 18th, 2012 at 01:42:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
If they can't privatize they co-opt corrupt.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Dec 18th, 2012 at 02:13:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Most academic research is de facto privatised anyway.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Dec 18th, 2012 at 02:31:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It's both funny and sad to see the saltwater guys say stuff like this:
Saltwater economists in the New Keynesian school -- which sort of included me, for instance in my liquidity-trap writing -- were doing intertemporal-maximization models that in effect conceded a lot of ground to freshwater styles of analysis, but with distortions -- monopolistic competition and sticky prices -- that made room for demand failures as a cause of recession. And many of the economists doing this stuff imagined that they were part of real discourse with the freshwater side,

And seem to think that that's a praiseworthy show of open-mindedness.

As opposed to hitching your wagon to a built-to-fail modeling architecture.

- Jake

Austerity can only be implemented in the shadow of a concentration camp.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 06:03:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
They were reaching across the aisle.

</applause>

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Dec 18th, 2012 at 01:47:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
 
The state of macro is, in fact, rotten, and will remain so until the cult that has taken over half the field is somehow dislodged.

Uhh... I think the saltwater school could also use serious attention, as the author of the blog to which DeLong linked said. Poor saltwater economists. The freshwater guys can be decisively shown to be wrong, but, because of the preponderance of their capture of the discipline, don't have to and won't admit they have been shown wrong. Money probably prefers fresh water. So what was gained by compromising to stay part of the mainstream? Why cling to equilibrium analysis? Or is all of this still about honoring Samuelson?

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 07:53:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
ARGeezer:
Money probably prefers fresh water. So what was gained by compromising to stay part of the mainstream?

You seem to have offered a potential answer.

Or put it this way: the ideological hegemony of Chicago economics was such that no career was possible without kneeling on at least one knee to it.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Dec 18th, 2012 at 01:58:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The answer is that they sorta stayed part of the mainstream. They became the tame, housebroken safe alternative view in the field. I learned in contracting what an advantage it can be when you can choose your competition. It was worth not bidding on some jobs or bidding them very conservatively so bidders you could always beat if you wanted would remain in the bid pool.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Dec 18th, 2012 at 02:22:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Stephanie Kelton@deficitowl

This may be the last Krugman post I ever read. RT @matthewstoller: Krugman gets ready to endorse Social Security cuts. http:/krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/12/17/rumors-of-a-deal ...

Stephanie Kelton@deficitowl

My 7-yr old son just asked, "Why are you mad @NYTimeskrugman? Is he working with @BarackObama or something?" #KnowsTooMuch

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Dec 18th, 2012 at 02:26:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
ROFL

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Dec 18th, 2012 at 03:07:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Review:
My review of The Hobbit in twelve words: Freeman's magnificent, but the human story is overwhelmed by video-game aesthetics.

I was pretty close to the fourth of the four Hobbit-anticipating camps I presented the other day, but it turned out that I only got to spend about an hour-and-a-half in Middle-earth, and had to spend the rest in a Tolkien-trademarked version of World of Warcraft.

  • Your Next Challenge: Avoid Being Crushed by the Stone Giants!

  • Your Next Challenge: Escape from the Goblin King!

  • Your Next Challenge: Fight the Pale Orc and His Wargs!
  • Except it wasn't my challenge at all: all I could to was watch the dwarves bounce around from horror to horror. My hands felt empty and useless without the controller they so obviously needed. Video-game aesthetics are built around the assumption of manual activity: they work far better when you have something to do. I didn't really want to sit passively and watch Peter Jackson play with his Xbox but that's what I felt was happening to me for much of the second half of the movie. All I could do was sigh and wait for Peter to finish so we might return for a while to something like a human story.

    by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 03:16:59 PM EST
    Underneath all the violence is the strong nod to hippiedom.

    "Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anas Nin
    by Crazy Horse on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 03:58:59 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    or a cynical conflation of both?

    "We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh
    by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 05:23:43 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    You nailed my experience, GK.

    For much of the film, it was indeed the story I read when I was eight, then later read to my children. For the rest, it was like Jackson's King Kong : about double the useful length, with added monsters.

    It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

    by eurogreen on Tue Dec 18th, 2012 at 09:30:35 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Cloud Atlas was way better.


    "Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anas Nin
    by Crazy Horse on Tue Dec 18th, 2012 at 10:56:04 AM EST
    [ Parent ]

    The "Books" French magazine had this cover this month: English text addition by me:

    books-mag-girl-gun-lucky-02445

    Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.

    by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 03:18:27 PM EST
    brilliant.

    come to our school, the teachers are expert marksmen and there are more guards and security checkpoints than fort knox...

    being branded any kind of 'loner' will invite armies of psychologists and attitude 'adjustment' meds to ensure proper mental 'compliance'.

    fuck just take the fucking guns away already.

    i notive bbc world is (intentionally?) running footage of the commiseration at newtown (town name straight out of stephen king's brain?), followed in seamless segue to the 9 afghan girls blown up by an old landmine.

    jeez, the world is multiply messed up.

    "We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

    by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 05:33:05 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Newtown was founded in 1704. It is new only in name.

    As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
    by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 07:56:48 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    But it might well be chosen in fiction.
    by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Dec 18th, 2012 at 02:00:07 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Funny about that.

    As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
    by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Dec 18th, 2012 at 02:09:19 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    See, what you don't understand is that if the shooter's mother had had a gun or two, she would have been able to stop him before this all got started...
    by asdf on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 10:38:56 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    And if all these guys in Fort Hood had been armed, there wouldn't have been a massacre there...
    by Katrin on Tue Dec 18th, 2012 at 02:05:33 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Thing was, she did -- but foolishly didn't go to bed with a couple of automatics and an assault rifle, loaded and safety off.

    It seems she also foolishly allowed herself to go to sleep.

    by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Dec 18th, 2012 at 02:06:57 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Is there a way to post that on Twitter?
    by asdf on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 10:40:03 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Upload it to your favorite image hosting service and post a link?

    There is also a dedicated Twitter-integrated image hosting facility, but the name escapes me at the moment.

    - Jake

    Austerity can only be implemented in the shadow of a concentration camp.

    by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Tue Dec 18th, 2012 at 05:19:02 AM EST
    [ Parent ]

    url is   http://www.flickr.com/photos/sybariter/8281239313/

    Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.

    by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Tue Dec 18th, 2012 at 11:22:33 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    by Sven Triloqvist on Tue Dec 18th, 2012 at 03:21:58 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Interesting doc on David Geffen.

    As Reg says - Geffen knew the art of the deal.

    You can't be me, I'm taken

    by Sven Triloqvist on Mon Dec 17th, 2012 at 04:36:56 PM EST
    that was really interesting, thanks for posting

    keep to the Fen Causeway
    by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Dec 18th, 2012 at 03:12:08 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Fortunately I have a lot of music pros in my FB contacts.

    You can't be me, I'm taken
    by Sven Triloqvist on Tue Dec 18th, 2012 at 03:18:13 PM EST
    [ Parent ]


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