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European Salon de News, Discussion et Klatsch - 29-30 December

by DoDo Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 03:41:46 PM EST

 A Daily Review Of International Online Media 


Europeans on these dates in history:

1922 - premiere of the silent movie Nathan the Wise, which became a target and victim of an anti-Semitic campaign. A copy was discovered in 1996, and restored until 2010

More here and here

1812 - Prussian general Ludwig Yorck von Wartenburg kick-starts the defection of Prussia and other allies from Napoleon with his private truce with Russian troops, the Convention of Tauroggen

More here

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Display:
 EUROPE 



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 02:40:31 PM EST
David Cameron's moves could make EU fall apart, says Herman Van Rompuy | World news | The Guardian

David Cameron's quest to find a new deal for Britain in Europe by clawing back powers from Brussels could cause the European Union to fall apart quickly and inflict immense damage on the single market, Herman Van Rompuy, the president of the European council, has warned.

Van Rompuy, the top official in the EU, also voiced strong doubts about reopening EU treaties to retool Europe after years of debt crisis, further complicating Cameron's strategy, which hinges on renegotiating the Lisbon treaty in order to secure concessions for Britain.

"If every member state were able to cherry-pick those parts of existing policies that they most like, and opt out of those that they least like, the union in general, and the single market in particular, would soon unravel," he said.

The Tories want to keep the Single Market and ditch the rest (while the Continental austerians want to morph the rest via the Single Market but are actually strangling it). So Van Rompuy is telling them that there is no separate bargain.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 02:40:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Weird agreement from an unabashedly marketista British commentator:

Isolation from Europe wouldn't be splendid for the UK | Alain Minc | Comment is free | The Guardian

Continental Europeans aren't altar boys. Can anybody really imagine they're going to let the most profitable activities stay solely within London, and allow the City to remain the financial capital of the euro without Britain sharing the rights and duties of the EU? Today, ambiguity is the mainstay of the City: the continentals might well put up with the capital of the euro being outside the eurozone but still in the EU. They won't - politically, economically or financially - accept it being outside the EU. There's no point even trying to imagine the UK being treated like Norway or Switzerland, keeping all the advantages of the single market. You grant advantages to countries you hope will one day join the gang, not to a country that's just slammed the door in your face.

Let the British be under no illusions. It's not the French who will be most aggressive about this, but the Germans. The French will still be attached to the idea of maintaining a little counterbalance with regard to Berlin; the Germans will continue to follow their well-trodden path of reason and power, albeit somewhat tempered. Without the UK - a traditional brake on the strengthening of European institutions - the onward march will resume more easily, and the eurozone, soon to be widened to include Poland, will integrate more quickly and become de facto Europe, aside from two or three member states.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 02:41:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I wouldn't wish him on the English. Typical CW of the french elite is what you will hear from his mouth. Certainly nothing original, to be sure, as this man is also a notorious plagiarist, and has been condemned in french court for this too.

Perfectly typical of his status, not an original contribution to be made, simply mouth what you've heard at the last symposium or salon, and ride on the backs of the plebes.

by redstar on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 05:14:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Um, my bad. Actually, this jolly chap is not a Briton, but a self-described Anglophile Frenchman, Alain Minc, a public intellectual drifting from centre-left (Le Monde) to Sarkosistan. A 'self-hating' Frenchman saying City rubbish like this:

The EU needs the UK as a tireless advocate of the free market, and of competition with member states - France first and foremost - that have less of a market culture while remaining subject to protectionist and mercantilist temptations. And last, in a world where the values of freedom and democracy are the order of the day, for Europe even more than for the US, the absence of "the land of habeas corpus" would be an unfortunate symbol.

Why is The Guardian giving the op-ed pages to such guys?

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 05:21:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Minc is an out-and-out neolib business guru.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Dec 29th, 2012 at 01:49:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Britain could leave European Union, says Jacques Delors - UK-EU - FRANCE 24

Britain could leave the European Union and enter into a different sort of partnership with the political and economic bloc instead, former EU Commission chief Jacques Delors said on Friday.

"The British are solely concerned about their economic interests, nothing else. They could be offered a different form of partnership," Delors told the business daily Handelsblatt in an interview.

Delors is saying that there is a separate bargain. Ulike Van Rompuy, he doesn't seem to be concerned that others could request their separate bargains, too.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 02:41:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
He also forgets that Germany is "concerned about their economic interests, nothing else".
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 04:42:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Even if we talk about the current austerianism only, Merkel and especially Schäuble repeatedly expressed an intent to use the opportunity to 'push European integration', meaning to browbeat and blackmail others into institutional reforms of their liking (it's another issue that that didn't pan out as planned.)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 05:06:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
David Cameron 'risks leading Britain out of EU by accident' | World news | The Guardian
Lord Kerr of Kinlochard - who was at the heart of Britain's team during the Maastricht treaty negotiations in 1991 - fears the UK is facing "bust-up time" with the other 26 EU countries.

...Kerr, who was Foreign Office permanent secretary between 1997 and 2002, told the Guardian: "I think that the Cameron strategy, if he was back in Downing Street with a majority, could lead to our leaving by accident. I think there is an analytical error."

..."You could find yourself in an awkward situation in which you are stuck with a referendum pledge on the new deal and there is no new deal, or there is a new deal so trivial that it is mocked by Ukip and the press. In either scenario, it seems to me there is a risk that Cameron finds himself arguing we must go. I am sure that it is not what he wants to do."

Warning of "nasty" and "horrible" negotiations, he added: "It sounds more like bust-up time."



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 02:42:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
EUobserver.com / Economic Affairs / Worst of euro crisis over, says German minister
BERLIN - Confident that France will "fulfil its obligations" and with Greece off the hook for now, Germany's finance minister Wolfgang Schauble has cast a glimmer of hope for 2013.

"I believe the worst is behind us," Schaeuble told the daily newspaper Bild in an interview previewed on Thursday (27 December).

Economic projections show most of the eurozone will linger in recession next year, but Germany is likely to keep growing. "The situation is better than expected, also because trade with the US and Asia is picking up," Schaeuble said.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 02:42:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Eurozone crisis live: Former Greek finance minister denies 'Lagarde List' allegations | Business | guardian.co.uk

Drama has erupted over revelations, now being made by the leading Greek daily Ta Nea, that the three names linked to former finance minister George Papaconstantinou in the famous Lagarde list are in fact relatives he allegedly sought to protect.

The three have been named as the two daughters of his politician uncle, the late Michalis Papaconstantinou, and one of their husbands with Ta Nea describing the account of at least one of the holders at the Geneva branch of HSBC as containing $US 1.222.000.

"These individuals, who had been dropped from the [original] list, allegedly held two accounts one of which included $US 1.222.000 while the movement of sums on the other [account] do not appear as it was a closed [account]. This is what emerged from the comparison of the two lists as a result of the investigation by the economic prosecutors Grigoris Peponis and Spyros Mousakitis," Ta Nea wrote on its website.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 02:42:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]

French buyout bosses join flight to London

Several senior private equity executives based in Paris have moved to London, adding to a series of departures of rich individuals from France prompted by rising taxes.

(...)

The departures reflect the challenges facing French private equity firms to retain or attract staff as Mr Hollande seeks to raise taxes on capital gains and on carried interest, the share of the profit that buyout executives receive as a reward.

They also underline the increasingly fractious debate in France since Mr Hollande introduced a tax rate for the next two years of 75 per cent on people earning more than €1m a year.

"There's a very nasty atmosphere in France right now towards money," a private equity executive said. "The 75 per cent rate is just confiscatory, and who can really believe it will be temporary?"

(...)

The departures are not just affecting private equity. Banks have been considering whether to move staff from Paris to London, and entrepreneurs have warned they would set up their companies elsewhere.

Given how the general impression here on ET is that Hollande has fully capitulated to the demands or the millionaires already, the conclusion is that capitulation is not enough - the left must also give public and unconditional support to policies designed for a few multi-millionaires (in the short term) to the exclusion of everyone else.

Never mind, the 75% tax rate has just been declared unconstitutional this morning.

And no actual data on whether more financiers and businessmen moved from Paris to London in the past few months compared to the years before?

Wind power

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Sat Dec 29th, 2012 at 06:03:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Given that I live and work in a universe where people actually believe all that shit (that France is declining, choked by over-powerful unions and extravagant benefits for lazy workers, hating entrepreneurs, and sliding rapidly into irrelevance) and send me nasty emails whenever I try to argue otherwise, I must admit I am a bit depressed, politically speaking.

So I try to focus on my work, which is at least helping to address some real societal issues, but it sometimes feels like bringing a glass of water in the desert.

Wind power

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Sat Dec 29th, 2012 at 06:08:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
france is declining only insofar as it's not following your stellar example and going 'green giraffe' on their economy.

right under their fricking noses...

i heard tonight that germany scuttled its alt energy industry and gave it to china in exchange for access to their luxury car markets, due to lobby pressure.

true? sounds evil enough...

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Dec 31st, 2012 at 06:58:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Jerome a Paris:
Hollande has fully capitulated to the demands or the millionaires already

Rather (speaking for myself at least), the main point is that he has capitulated to German demands for austerity coupled with "competitiveness" efforts. Not quite the same as the "demands of the millionaires".

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Dec 29th, 2012 at 06:24:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Le Conseil constitutionnel censure la taxe à 75 % sur les très hauts revenus, promesse phare de Hollande The Constitutional Council strikes down tax at 75% on very high incomes, a flagship promise of Hollande
Le Conseil constitutionnel a décidé, samedi 29 décembre, de censurer l'impôt de 75 % sur la tranche des revenus supérieurs à un million d'euros, une des mesures les plus emblématiques du président François Hollande durant la campagne présidentielle.The Constitutional Council decided, Saturday 29 December, to censure the tax of 75% on incomes in excess of a million euros, one of the most iconic proposals of President François Hollande during the presidential campaign.
... Garant de la constitutionnalité des lois, le Conseil n'a donc pas visé le principe de la taxe, mais bien son mécanisme de calcul. ...... Guarantor of the constitutionality of laws, the Council did not object to the principle of the tax, but its calculation mechanism. ...
Avec cette taxation, un ménage, dont chaque membre percevrait un revenu de 900 000 euros, se trouverait exempté, tandis qu'un autre, dont un seul membre gagnerait 1,2 million d'euros et l'autre rien, devrait l'acquitter, ce qui constituerait à l'évidence une "rupture d'égalité au regard de la faculté contributive", a-t-on expliqué, à titre d'exemple, au Conseil. With this tax, a household in which each member received an income of 900,000 euros, would be exempt, while another, where only one member earned €1.2 million and the other nothing, would have to pay, which would be an obvious "unequal treatment with regard to ability to pay" , the Council gave as an example.

Since income tax in France is paid by household, not per individual, this objection was fairly obvious (and had already been stated).

So why did the government not frame the tax per household? Gross incompetence? Wish to see the tax struck down while giving the appearance of respecting a campaign promise?

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Dec 29th, 2012 at 06:46:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
afew:
Wish to see the tax struck down while giving the appearance of respecting a campaign promise?

I'll have to admit: this has crossed my mind too...

by Bernard on Sat Dec 29th, 2012 at 04:44:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
 ECONOMY & FINANCE 


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 02:42:56 PM EST
Struggling French shipyard lands $1.2 billion contract - FRANCE - FRANCE 24

An ailing French shipyard landed a billion-euro contract Thursday as a US cruise company announced it was ordering a massive luxury liner from STX France at Saint Nazaire.

The deal comes as a lifeline to the shipyard, which had failed to secure any major orders for nearly two years.

...Miami-based Royal Caribbean International said it was ordering a sister ship to its two top-of-the-line cruise liners, the Oasis of the Seas and Allure of the Seas, with an option on a second vessel.

"This contract exceeds 1 billion euros representing over 10 million hours' work over three years for the Atlantic shipyards and their sub-contractors," said French Finance Minister Pierre Moscovici in a joint statement with Foreign Trade Minister Nicole Bricq.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 02:43:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Is there anything not "struggling" in France?

Wind power
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Sat Dec 29th, 2012 at 05:56:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
FRANCE 24 is SUCH rubbish
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Dec 29th, 2012 at 06:27:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
EUobserver.com / Institutional Affairs / EU appoints tobacco lobbyist to top ethics panel

BRUSSELS - The European Commission has attracted criticism for reappointing a tobbaco lobbyist to its ethics committee on lobbying.

It gave the job to Michel Petite - a French lawyer at the London-based firm Clifford Chance, who works for US tobacco giant Philip Morris - just before Christmas.

As part of the three-man ethics panel, he will advise the EU executive if it is OK for former commissioners to join private companies in the same sector as their old portfolios.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 02:43:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
FFS.
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Sat Dec 29th, 2012 at 05:42:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
EUobserver.com / Institutional Affairs / EU appoints tobacco lobbyist to top ethics panel

The other people reappointed to the panel are Terry Wynn and Rafael Garcia-Valdecasas y Fernandez.

Wynn is a British former MEP who is now a Methodist preacher and who speaks on EU policy at academic events. Garcia-Valdecasas y Fernandez is a Spanish former judge at the EU court in Luxembourg.

The three men in 2010 said it was OK for erstwhile industry commissioner Gunther Verheugen to launch a lobby firm - The European Experience Company - two months after leaving his post.

It said nothing when ex-fisheries-commissioner Joe Borg joined a company which lobbies the EU on maritime policy.

It also had no objections when former internal market commissioner Charlie McCreevy, whose job involved transport policy, went to work for Irish airline Ryanair.

The Augean Stables have got nothing on this.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Dec 29th, 2012 at 06:03:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
After 80 years in print, Newsweek goes digital only - USA - FRANCE 24

Almost 80 years after first going to print, the final Newsweek magazine hit newsstands Monday featuring an ironic hashtag as a symbol of its Twitter-era transition to an all-digital format.

The second-largest news weekly magazine in the United States has been grappling with a steep drop in print advertising revenue, steadily declining circulation and the migration of readers to free news online.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 02:43:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
 WORLD 


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 02:43:36 PM EST
Russia's ban on US adoption devastates American couples - Americas - World - The Independent
Russian President Vladimir Putin's decision to sign a bill that bars Americans from adopting Russian children has provoked anguish among US families who have been waiting months, and in some cases years, to complete the process.

The legislation caps a year of increasing Russian hostility toward the United States, stoked by Putin but taken up with unexpected gusto by members of parliament. A series of measures has taken aim at what is perceived to be -- or characterized as -- American interference in Russian concerns, from political organizing to the defense of human rights. The adoption bill is seen as retaliation against a U.S. law that targets corrupt Russian officials.

Passage of the legislation is a benchmark in the deterioration of Russian-American relations, and unlike some of the earlier, symbolic moves, it has real consequences. Over the past 20 years, 60,000 Russians have been adopted by Americans, and officials said the measure would block the pending adoptions of 46 children.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 02:43:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Central African Republic in plea for help against rebels - CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC - FRANCE 24
President François Bozizé of the Central African Republic has appealed for French and US help to stop rebel forces that threaten to overrun the country's capital. The US has evacuated its embassy and the United Nations is also pulling out its staff.

..."There is no question of allowing them to kill Central Africans, of letting them destroy houses and pillage, and holding a knife to our throats to demand dialogue," said Bozize, who himself seized power in a coup in 2003.

...The rebel coalition known as Seleka -- which means "alliance" in the country's Sango language -- has seized four regional capitals, including a diamond mining hub, since its fighters took up arms on December 10.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 02:43:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Russia reaches out to Syrian opposition in diplomatic rush - SYRIA - FRANCE 24

Russia has invited the opposition Syria National Coalition to hold talks amid frantic efforts to find a diplomatic solution to the 21-month-old crisis in the country.

Russia's Deputy Foreign Minister Mikhail Bogdanov told the RIA Novosti news agency that talks with the head of the Syria National Coalition, Ahmed Moaz al-Khatib, may be held in the Russian capital of Moscow or in a foreign location like Geneva or Cairo.

...Russia, one of Syrian President Bashar al Assad's last remaining allies, has so far strongly criticised moves by Western and anti-Assad Arab states recognising the Syria National Coalition as legitimate representatives of the Syrian people since the group was formed last month.

A Syrian deputy foreign minister visited Moscow on Thursday and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov is due to meet the UN and Arab League envoy to Syria, Lakhdar Brahimi, on Saturday.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 02:44:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Bahrain's opposition split over violence | Globalization | DW.DE | 28.12.2012
Bahrain's Arab Spring started almost two years ago. Since the government outlawed the mainly peaceful demonstrations, younger protesters in particular are increasingly turning to violence - and dividing the opposition.

...younger protestors also strongly oppose Western policy towards Bahrain. The EU and Britain have historically had close ties to Bahrain because of its oil supplies and strategic location in the Gulf. The US Navy's Fifth Fleet is stationed here to protect oil shipping lanes and assert US presence.

But some opposition activists accuse the US of a double standard. While the Obama administration imposes strong economic sanctions on Syria's dictatorship, they say, it only verbally criticizes Bahrain's monarchy.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 02:44:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Mass anti-government protests in Iraq | News | DW.DE | 28.12.2012

Protesters from Iraq's Sunni Muslim minority poured onto the streets after Friday's prayers in the latest of a series of demonstrations against the Shi'ite Muslim premier.

Near the central city of Falluja around 60,000 people keep up an almost week-old blockade of the main highway. Demonstrators set fire to the Iranian flag, shouting "out, out Iran! Baghdad stays free" and "Maliki you coward, don't take your advice from Iran."

...Protests erupted on Sunday after troops loyal to the prime minister detained at least nine bodyguards of Iraq's Sunni finance minister on terrorism charges. In daily protests activists have called for an end to the marginalization of Sunnis, the abolition of anti-terrorism laws they say are used to target them, and the release of the bodyguards.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 02:44:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Son launches political career on Bhutto anniversary - PAKISTAN - FRANCE 24
More than 200,000 people gathered at the Bhutto family mausoleum in Garhi Khuda Bakhsh in the southern province of Sindh to pay their respects to Benazir and to hear Bilawal Bhutto Zardari make his first major public speech.

Bhutto, twice elected prime minister, was killed in a gun and suicide attack after an election rally in Rawalpindi, the headquarters of Pakistan's army, on December 27, 2007. No one has ever been convicted of her murder.

In an impassioned speech amid tight security, Bilawal -- the third generation of his family to go into politics -- promised to continue the fight for the poor and against "anti-democratic forces".

It's funny from my perspective that the heir of a dynasty speaks about defending democracy, but Pakistan has bigger issues.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 02:44:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yesterday IWR reported a new record in reduced conventional electricity production for Germany, which I will only paraphrase: in the hour starting at 23h on 25 December, only 19.24 GW was needed, as wind power gave 18.42 GW. The previous minumum this year was 22.3 GW in the morning of 17 June.

The maximum of conventional energy demand in 2002 was 66.5 GW on 14 December, which coincided with an unplanned shutdown of a 1.344 GW nuclear reactor. But it was nowhere near the capacity limit, even if this plant and the 74 GW of renewable and 2.7 GW of cold reserve capacity is substracted from the 175 GW power plant total.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 02:44:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
DoDo:
in 2002

2012, surely.

DoDo:

unplanned shutdown of a 1.344 GW nuclear reactor

Unplanned? Shutdown? How can this be?

Oh, nuclear too needs backup?

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Dec 29th, 2012 at 06:11:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
2012, surely.

Correct... And 22.3 GW was the previous minimum :-)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Sat Dec 29th, 2012 at 07:58:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
From Rolling Stone
Another day, another corporate titan suffering from devastating amnesia. This time, the memory-loss patient is none other than Angelo Mozilo, the former CEO of Countrywide Financial.

[...]

Q. Okay. And in the e-mail that came to you, do you notice that it states, in the list of attributes, "Verified income is $5,848 versus 20,833 stated"? Do you see that?

THE WITNESS: I don't see that.

Q. It's the sixth line up, seventh line up from the bottom.

A. Uh-huh.

Q. Do you see that?

A. Yes.

Q. What does that mean, "Verified income is 5,848 versus 20,833 stated"?

A. I don't know.

Q. Doesn't it mean that he said on his application he earns 20,833 per month, whereas all Countrywide could verify was 5,848?

A. I'm not sure.

by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Sat Dec 29th, 2012 at 04:08:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
WSJ
The head of the Orthodox Church in Russia, the country famous for its penchant for expensive cars and an unsafe driving culture, called on his clergy to choose their vehicles "with modesty" and not to drink "holy sacraments" before driving.
by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Sat Dec 29th, 2012 at 07:37:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Michael Hudson naked capitalism

On why the US electorate and public is so resolutely insistent on being the agents of their own despoilation.

(H)istory is written by the victors, and the past generation has seen the banks and financial sector emerge victorious. Holding the bottom 99% in debt, the top 1% are now in the process of subsidizing a deceptive economic theory to persuade voters to pursue policies that benefit the financial sector at the expense of labor, industry, and democratic government as we know it.

Wall Street lobbyists blame unemployment and the loss of industrial competitiveness on government spending and budget deficits - especially on social programs - and labor's demand to share in the economy's rising productivity. The myth (perhaps we should call it junk economics) is that (1) governments should not run deficits (at least, not by printing their own money), because (2) public money creation and high taxes (at lest on the wealthy) cause prices to rise. The cure for economic malaise (which they themselves have caused), is said to be less public spending, along with more tax cuts for the wealthy, who euphemize themselves as "job creators." Demanding budget surpluses, bank lobbyists insist that austerity can enable private-sector debts to be paid.

The reality is that when banks load the economy down with debt, this leaves less to spend on domestic goods and services while driving up housing prices (and hence the cost of living) with reckless credit creation on looser lending terms. Yet on top of this debt deflation, bank lobbyists urge fiscal deflation: budget surpluses rather than pump-priming deficits. The effect is to further reduce private-sector market demand, shrinking markets and employment. Governments fall deeper into distress, and are told to sell off land and natural resources, public enterprises, and other assets. This creates a lucrative market for bank loans to finance privatization on credit. This explains why financial lobbyists back the new buyers' right to raise the prices they charge for basic needs, creating a united front to endorse rent extraction. The effect is to enrich the financial sector owned by the 1% in ways that indebt and privatize the economy at large - individuals, business and the government itself.

This policy was exposed as destructive in the late 1920s and early 1930s when John Maynard Keynes, Harold Moulton and a few others countered the claims of Jacques Rueff and Bertil Ohlin that debts of any magnitude could be paid if governments would impose deep enough austerity and suffering. This is the doctrine adopted by the International Monetary Fund to impose on Third World debtors since the 1960s, and by European neoliberals defending creditors imposing austerity on Ireland, Greece, Spain and Portugal.

This pro-austerity mythology aims to distract the public from asking why peacetime governments can't simply print the money they need. Given the option of printing money instead of levying taxes, why do politicians only create new spending power for the purpose of waging war and destroying property, not to build or repair bridges, roads and other public infrastructure? Why should the government tax employees for future retirement payouts, but not Wall Street for similar user fees and financial insurance to build up a fund to pay for future bank over-lending crises? For that matter, why doesn't the U.S. Government print the money to pay for Social Security and medical care, just as it created new debt for the $13 trillion post-2008 bank bailout? (I will return to this question below.)



As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Dec 30th, 2012 at 02:27:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
New MRSA superbug strain found in UK milk supply

A new strain of MRSA has been found in British milk, indicating that the superbug is spreading through the livestock population and poses a growing threat to human health. The new strain, MRSA ST398, has been identified in seven samples of bulk milk from five different farms in England.

The discovery, from tests on 1,500 samples, indicates that antibiotic-resistant organisms are gaining an increasing hold in the dairy industry. The disclosure comes amid growing concern over the use of modern antibiotics on British farms, driven by price pressure imposed by the big supermarket chains. Intensive farming with thousands of animals raised in cramped conditions means infections spread faster and the need for antibiotics is consequently greater.

Three classes of antibiotics rated as "critically important to human medicine" by the World Health Organisation - cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones and macrolides - have increased in use in the animal population by eightfold in the last decade.


As societies we are like a monkey caught in a monkey trap. The monkey's brain, unfortunately for all, is the financial sector. The monkey has grasped the shinny object inside the coconut and won't let go even as the human with the net approaches. The future for the monkey is monkey meat or captivity. The future for our societies is decimation by multiple drug resistant bacteria we knowingly breed as part of our food chain. Those who know and understand the implications are not part of the brain circuit that makes decisions about releasing the profit that is the shinny in this case.

Pasteurization should make the milk safe but living things find a way. We are playing Russian roulette with a gun that has hundreds of chambers and who knows how many hold live ammunition. If only the bacteria would avoid those who know better.


As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Dec 30th, 2012 at 02:47:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The Financial Sector?
driven by price pressure imposed by the big supermarket chains


I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Dec 30th, 2012 at 05:06:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Here the supermarkets operate in loco rex

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Dec 30th, 2012 at 07:55:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Sorta: "You are operating on our money and you can make a bit more for both of us if you also use our brother's antibiotics. There are plenty who do."

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Jan 1st, 2013 at 11:28:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]
ARGeezer:
If only the bacteria would avoid those who know better.

you mean those who don't drink the stuff?

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Dec 31st, 2012 at 07:04:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Unfortunately, no. If the path is not through the milk products it may be through the meat or the eggs. And the bacteria cannot and will not distinguish between those who have warned about the risks and those who have denied them.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Jan 1st, 2013 at 11:34:36 AM EST
[ Parent ]
People only have themselves to blame if they don't have a bacterial laboratory:

to test the products they purchase.


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Tue Jan 1st, 2013 at 12:10:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
 LIVING OFF THE PLANET 
 Environment, Energy, Agriculture, Food 


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 02:45:04 PM EST
Shellfish reef off UK's west coast could be biggest in world - Nature - Environment - The Independent

More than 100 million brightly coloured and rare shellfish have been found in Loch Alsh, a sea inlet between Skye and the Scottish mainland.

The reef of flame shells, or Limaria hians, was found to cover an area of 4.6 square miles (7.5 sq km) during a survey commissioned by Marine Scotland.

It is the largest known colony of flame shells in the UK and possibly the world, according to experts.

...Ben James, marine survey and monitoring manager at Scottish Natural Heritage, said: "Our job has been to advise ministers on suitable places for Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) and to do that we need to have enough information about what's in the marine environment.

"Whilst we had some records of flame shells in Loch Alsh, we had no idea how big the bed was.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 02:45:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Apologies if this has already been seen and discussed... I'm in and out a lot, lately.

New advances in solar technology from MIT.

"MIT researchers have produced a new kind of photovoltaic cell based on sheets of flexible graphene coated with a layer of nanowires."

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher

by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Sat Dec 29th, 2012 at 03:44:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I think we have seen that claim before, but as with all these things, getting reproducible results in a lab is a long way from being commercially viable

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Dec 29th, 2012 at 11:52:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Here is a link to the abstract for the original paper.  The authors note:

Growth of semiconducting nanostructures on graphene would open up opportunities for the development of flexible optoelectronic devices, but challenges remain in preserving the structural and electrical properties of graphene during this process.

Have to read the paper to see what they mean by the underlined text.    


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Sat Dec 29th, 2012 at 12:29:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Not this, but earlier this month I posted a story on similar research by a rival team led by another Korean at Princeton.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sat Dec 29th, 2012 at 08:05:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No doubt this resource will soon be "managed" into oblivion

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Dec 29th, 2012 at 11:51:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
flandersnews.be: "Nuclear energy no longer acceptable" says nuclear chief

The departing head of Belgium's nuclear watchdog Willy De Roovere has courted controversy by making a remarkable pronouncement as he prepares to leave the industry. Mr De Roovere says that he does not think that the risks linked to nuclear energy are acceptable today.

Willy De Roovere worked for Electrabel, Belgium's main energy generator for many years before he went on to head the FANC, the Federal Agency for Nuclear Control, the nuclear industry's watchdog. He leaves the FANC at the end of the year. Belga

2012 has been an important year for the nuclear industry both at home and abroad. Minute cracks were uncovered in the nuclear reactors at Doel and Tihange and two reactors were taken out of service. In January the FANC is expected to advise the government that the reactors that have stood idle for over six months can be restarted.

Against the backdrop of the Fukushima disaster in Japan Mr De Roovere makes a number of remarkable pronouncement for a man who has spent most of his working life in the nuclear sector: "We have to live with the fact that there is always some risk attached to nuclear energy. We should also ask ourselves whether this risk is acceptable for our society. I believe today that it is no longer acceptable."

"When we see the risk of nuclear energy, then I would prefer other forms of energy, but the issue must be debated: if we drop nuclear and China does not, then of course this will have an economic impact."

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 04:40:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Attempting a less ad hominem comment than in the OT: not giving the all-clear to Doel and Tihange would have been a clearer message.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 05:10:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
 LIVING ON THE PLANET 
 Society, Culture, History, Information 


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 02:45:31 PM EST
'Sugar Man' tackles mystery of accidental stardom - CINEMA - FRANCE 24

"Truth is stranger than fiction", a popular saying goes, and rarely has the cliché - originally an approximation of a line from Romantic poet Lord Byron's "Don Juan" - felt more accurate than in the nimble and engaging documentary "Searching for Sugar Man" (released in France on December 26).

Even the pitch sounds farcical: a Swedish director's investigation into a US folk musician whose career crashed before it ever got off the ground, but who, unbeknown to him, became an icon among South Africans under the erroneous impression that he was dead.

Posted in the Living On... section because this amazing story is not really about a single man.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 02:45:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Germany's far-flung pensioners living in care around the world | World news | guardian.co.uk

Hannelore Könnemann is delighted with her new retirement home, a three-room flat in which she has managed to fit some of her favourite pieces of baroque furniture. "The first night I arrived I lay in bed saying, 'Thank God. I'm safe,'" said the 78-year-old former shop owner. The best thing about it, she says, is that she was able to bring her great dane dog, Julio.

But the most bizarre aspect of it is that she's living not in her native Gelsenkirchen in western Germany, but 760 miles (1,220km) away on the banks of Lake Balaton in Hungary. Könnemann has been a resident for the past two months in SeniorCare Pflegeheim Balaton. She pays €2,100 (£1,725) a month for her accommodation, meals and medical care, which would cost her at least a third more in Germany.

...The common thread running through most of the thousands of column inches of angry commentary on the practice, is how can Germany take such a pragmatic and cold approach to the provision of its elderly citizens? Nicknaming the trend "oma export" ("granny export"), Heribert Prantl of the Süddeutsche Zeitung, wrote of his shame that "a country that is capable of building the best machines in the world has not yet been able to develop a proper and intelligent care concept when in a generation from now every 15th German will be in need of care." He added that Germans, who prided themselves in being Exportweltmeisters (great exporters), had extended the practice to everything that it was useful to be rid of.

"Rubbish is exported, atomic waste, old medicines ... are deposited wherever it is cheapest to dispose of them ... and now we're exporting our infirm and elderly. Gerontological colonialism sounds like something invented in a madhouse, but it's for real. Will we also start exporting our children when the kindergartens become too expensive?" he wrote.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 02:45:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm sort of surprised that there hasn't been a push for the PIGS countries to capitalize on this.  It actually makes a lot of sense if done right. Particularly with assisted living facilities rather than actual nursing homes. Lots of cheap real estate, and I'm certain that there are plenty of trained nurses and such. All likely at a fraction of the price in Germany.

And I'll give my consent to any government that does not deny a man a living wage-Billy Bragg
by ManfromMiddletown (manfrommiddletown at lycos dot com) on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 04:45:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
sounds like an opportunity to disperse all of that unused property in Spin which is clogging the real estate market.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Dec 29th, 2012 at 11:55:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
To what extent does seniors want to move to the another country where they speak a foreign language and be a long way from family and friends? If it is not the seniors that clamors to move, dumping them in another country could become a very impopular move. And the right wing governments in Europe often lean on a strong support among elder voters so they have a reason to care about how they feel.

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!
by A swedish kind of death on Sun Dec 30th, 2012 at 02:20:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's those old people who need care who are "exported", mind. I doubt that many of them vote.
by Katrin on Sun Dec 30th, 2012 at 02:33:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Interestingly, learning another language is supposed to be one of the best ways to prolong your life.
by njh on Mon Dec 31st, 2012 at 03:23:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Just the perfect counterparty to the dismantling of the incipient domestic dependent care systems in the PIIGS, as well as a perfect way to pricing the elderly in the PIIGS out of domestic managed care by driving up the price of managed care. We can also have a German-credit-fuelled managed care bubble to replace the deflated German-credit-fuelled real-estate bubbles of the past decade.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Dec 30th, 2012 at 02:48:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I can feel a Modest Proposal for a Eurozone transfer mechanism coming through this...
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Dec 30th, 2012 at 02:56:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
when berlusconi tried to kick out a bunch of immigrants a couple of years ago, they had to retract the law subito because they suddenly realised how many were employed as 'badante' (carer), and how many italian elderly were going to be abandoned.

quite funny, and sad... seeing how italy is turning into one giant nursing home anyway.

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Dec 31st, 2012 at 08:03:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Competitiveness is all...

Oh, and

DoDo:

Exportweltmeisters (great exporters)

Any fool can see that means Export World Masters, not "great exporters".

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Dec 29th, 2012 at 07:57:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Export world champions, actually.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sat Dec 29th, 2012 at 08:08:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm interested in the primary sense of meister, which is "master". Not that "champion" is less aggressive a term:

Online Etymology Dictionary

champion (n.)
early 13c., from Old French champion "combatant, champion in single combat" (12c.), from Late Latin campionem (nom. campio) "gladiator, fighter, combatant in the field," from Latin campus "field (of combat);" see campus. Had been borrowed earlier by Old English as cempa.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Dec 30th, 2012 at 02:41:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The English "master" has at least these four meanings: master of a slave or servant, master of one's fate, master of an apprentice, and master of a skill or craft. Although sharing the same Latin root, the German Meister (at least today) only has the last two meanings (and the "champion" meaning is derived from the last). For the first two meanings, Herr is used.

It's worth to note that modern German also has Viceweltmeister (deputy world champion) and its equivalents for other tournament levels, which lends for a greater appreciation of silver medalists than any other language I know.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Sun Dec 30th, 2012 at 04:29:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I mean, Vizeweltmeister.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sun Dec 30th, 2012 at 05:55:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Someone must be reading statistics because Swedish news had a report on the increase in retirees living abroad. Though when broken down, this appears to be driven by a desire to return to the country of origin - mainly Finland. Sweden had a lot of immigration in the 60ies and 70ies in order to increase industrial production. Mostly young workers born in the 40ies and early 50ies that are now retiring, some in their country of origin.

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!
by A swedish kind of death on Mon Dec 31st, 2012 at 07:52:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Thatcher was ready for Falkland Islands deal, National Archives papers show | UK news | The Guardian
UK government declarations and rhetoric at the time gave the impression that nothing short of the withdrawal of all Argentinian forces, the reaffirmation of British sovereignty and a return to the position as it was before the invasion would be acceptable. But the papers show Thatcher and her senior ministers were privately adopting a more flexible approach, including allowing a continuing Argentinian presence on the islands.

Less than two weeks after the Argentinian invasion on 2 April 1982, Thatcher described a "diplomatic solution" as being "a considerable prize". She was responding specifically to a plan whereby in return for withdrawing its troops Argentina would be represented on an interim commission and on Falkland Islands councils.

...The disclosure that Thatcher was contemplating a peaceful solution to the Falklands dispute, even after the British taskforce had set sail, is contained in confidential annexes to cabinet minutes released under the so-called 30-year rule.

...The papers reveal details of a private telephone conversation between Thatcher and Ronald Reagan, the US president, on 1 June 1982. "President Reagan said the USA considered it imperative that the UK should show that it was prepared to talk before the Argentinians were forced to withdraw," a note said. "As the UK now had the upper hand militarily it should strike a deal now."

There is new info on the Belgrano sinking, too, but many files are still kept secret. (I found no mention of why Thatcher re-considered, for example.)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 02:46:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Margaret Thatcher worried about Gibraltar during the Falklands war | World news | guardian.co.uk

Margaret Thatcher repeatedly agonised over Gibraltar's vulnerability to attack from Spain during the 1982 Falkland's conflict, newly released cabinet papers reveal.

"I understand that the prime minister has expressed concern about the implications of the Falklands Islands crisis for Gibraltar," one of her private secretaries recorded in papers released to the National Archives under the 20 year rule, adding: "particularly in the light of reports of the jubilant reaction in the Spanish press."

A British military review of Gibraltar's position gave "a rather more reassuring picture", he remarked, adding: "We have no reason to believe that there is an increased military threat to Gibraltar from the Spanish government.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 02:46:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Margaret Thatcher was a fuckwit.

Did anyonr ever think otherwise?

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 04:33:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
her voters probably
by Katrin on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 05:18:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Lot of fuckwits around. :(
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Dec 29th, 2012 at 06:15:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Margaret Thatcher warned François Mitterrand off selling Exocets to Argentina - UK Politics - UK - The Independent
Even in the opinion of its author it was a scheme that owed more to James Bond than the reality of the Falklands War. The Attorney General hatched a plan to thwart Argentine efforts to get hold of fresh supplies of Exocet missiles by using a secret agent to hijack a plane load of the weapons.

The scheme was laid out in a handwritten letter to Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher from Sir Michael Havers, the father of the actor Nigel Havers and the Government's most senior law advisor at the height of the 1982 war to re-take the islands in the South Atlantic.

There is actually nothing about Mitterrand in the article...

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 02:47:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Indeed. Not a single word.

DoDo, are you trying to freak us out with all this old British rubbish?

Or are the British media just becoming more and more rubbish?

 

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 04:38:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm playing music on the Titanic.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 05:26:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
DoDo:
I'm playing music on the Titanic.

encore! ....gurgle.

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Dec 31st, 2012 at 08:06:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It appears that The Independent's article was truncated half-way. The Guardian details the same James Bond scenario, then gives the country of the actual weapons traders:

Thatcher urged to steal French-made Exocet missiles during Falklands war | UK news | The Guardian

Israel and Israeli companies, a separate Foreign Office briefing warned, "... have made offers or are involved in negotiations on the supply of weapons [to Argentina] ... despite assurances" that they would not make any new deals.

Next The Guardian's article includes the actual Mitterrand correspondence which The Independent's title must refer to:

It was the French who held the largest stocks of the deadly weapons. Thatcher despatched an emotional secret appeal to President François Mitterrand, pleading with him to delay the export of more French Exocet missiles to South America.

In her telegram on 30 May 1982, she said cabinet colleagues were "all dismayed by the prospect of France supplying these missiles to Peru when, as you yourself agreed, there can be no doubt that Peru will pass them on to Argentina".

She added: "It would have a disastrous effect on the alliance as a whole. This is the last thing that either of us would wish. I hope therefore that for the time being you will be able to find some way of keeping those missiles in France."

The Guardian also reveals the cooperation of Pinochet's Chile (allowing the use of an island as spy plane base).

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 05:04:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
the conclusion on Radio 4 was that this might have made a difference to public sentiment at the subsequent election

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Dec 29th, 2012 at 11:59:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Real-World Economics Review: How to re-establish economics as a realist and relevant social science (5 changes) (December 30, 2012)
How do we put an end to this intellectual cataclysm? How do we re-establish credence and trust in economics? Five changes are absolutely decisive.

  1. Stop pretending that we have exact and rigorous answers on everything.

  2. Stop the childish and exaggerated belief in mathematics giving answers to important economic questions.

  3. Stop pretending that there are laws in economics.

  4. Stop treating other social sciences as poor relations.

  5. Stop building models and making forecasts of the future based on totally unreal micro-founded macromodels with intertemporally optimizing robot-like representative actors equipped with rational expectations.


I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Dec 30th, 2012 at 05:11:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
All of this would require as prerequisite the zeroeth point,

0. Stop being knowing or unknowing propagandists and refuse funding from benefactors with an agenda.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Sun Dec 30th, 2012 at 05:58:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Those people are doing excellent work.  

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Sun Dec 30th, 2012 at 01:29:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
 PEOPLE AND KLATSCH 


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 02:47:25 PM EST
Silvio Berlusconi must pay second wife '£2.5m a month in divorce settlement' - Europe - World - The Independent
Ex-Italian Premier Silvio Berlusconi must pay his second wife Veronica Lario three million euro (£2.5 million) a month in a divorce settlement, reports say.

But he gets to keep their estate, the Corriere della Sera newspaper said. The paperwork was filed on Christmas Day at Milan's tribunal.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 02:47:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
DoDo:
But he gets to keep their estate,

like she would want to live in the bunga bunga palace...

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Dec 31st, 2012 at 08:12:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
THREE fuckin' MILLION DOLLARS ... PER MONTH?  It totally boggles the mind what dear Veronica (or anyone else for that matter) could possibly find to spend three million dollars on each and every month. Consider the number of Italian lives that could be improved if that amount of money went into their hands instead, even every other month or so.

Sheez. It's no wonder the world has problems.

by sgr2 on Tue Jan 1st, 2013 at 07:07:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That's only $98,630 per day.  It can be quite difficult to make ends meet on that pittance.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Tue Jan 1st, 2013 at 12:14:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The paperwork was filed on Christmas Day at Milan's tribunal.

That is the most amazing part of the article. Unfortunately it's no longer there - I guess the Independent does its proofreading after publishing its articles. (It now says "before Christmas").

by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Tue Jan 1st, 2013 at 01:27:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Norman Schwarzkopf dies at 78 - Americas - World - The Independent
H Norman Schwarzkopf, the four-star Army general who led allied forces to a stunningly quick and decisive victory over Saddam Hussein's Iraqi military in the 1991 Persian Gulf War and who became the most celebrated US military hero of his generation, died Thursday in Tampa, Florida. He was 78.

Defence Secretary Leon Panetta confirmed the death in a statement. Schwarzkopf's sister, Ruth Barenbaum, told the Associated Press he had complications from pneumonia.

...Schwarzkopf does not fare nearly as well in a new book by Thomas Ricks, "The Generals." Ricks faults Schwarzkopf for failing to understand strategic aspects of the war, allowing much of the Republican Guard to escape from Kuwait, and for allowing the Iraqis to fly armed helicopters over Iraq following the end of the ground campaign. Those helicopter gunships were subsequently used to attack and decimate anti-Hussein Shiite uprisings in southern Iraq and Kurdish protests in the north.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Dec 28th, 2012 at 02:47:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]


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