Welcome to the new version of European Tribune. It's just a new layout, so everything should work as before - please report bugs here.

Monday Open Thread

by Nomad Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 01:22:53 PM EST

Still open!


Display:
I am number 1.  
by stevesim on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 02:10:35 PM EST
I am the new number 2.

You are number 6

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 02:27:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I am the new number 2.

You won't last more than a week.

by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 02:35:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's number 3's  that have to worry.
by stevesim on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 03:07:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ynet
In biblical times they could be found on every street corner, preaching God's word to sinners in a rumbling voice and shining eyes. A new course opening this week aims to restore passed glory and train the next generations of Jewish prophets - for the first time since the days of the Second Temple.

[...]

So what does one need to know to become a modern prophet? According to the course's syllabus, the future prophets will learn about face reading, dream interpretation and ways to achieve divine spirit.

The school's core studies also include an introduction on the angels' ways of communication and participation in our lives.

The course will take place on Tuesdays at the Palterin Shel Melech spiritual center in Tel Aviv. Each participant attending 10 one-hour lectures will receive a prophet's diploma. Registration costs NIS 200 (about $52).

The name of the school is the "Cain and Able School of Prophets". I prophesize that it won't end well.
by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 02:41:11 PM EST

Maybe that should be the Cane and Disable school of Prophets :-)

Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.
by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 02:56:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
 Meant, of course: School of profits :-)

Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.
by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 02:59:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ted. I do the jokes - you do the carefully referenced takedowns.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 03:22:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Oh, and just as I was thinking of trying voice-overs :-)

Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.
by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 06:44:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
this morning. They had their first November with no rain in Texas weather history. Temperature may go to 26C today.

Here in the Columbia River Gorge, we have not had a hard freeze as yet. No snow either. I think that I read that we had the longest stretch with no rain (July through October) in our weather history, too.

On the other hand it was one of the most colorful Autumns that I've seen here (33 years). The Vine Maple are always gorgeous, but they seemed to be brighter than usual in the forests. The more remarkable colors were the golds of the Cottonwoods - very Aspen-like this year - and the red-browns of the Oregon White Oaks. Most years, they're kind of dull yellow and brown-brown, respectively. I generally ascribe it to the Autumn rains.

Traveling to Yakima for the various campaign events was an eye-opener for me. It's quasi-desert on about 1/4 of the trip - sort of prairie taken over by sagebrush - but there are millions of Balsamroot Daisies and Lupines just waiting for the appropriate conditions to carpet the place. Very fun year, if non-average.

paul spencer

by paul spencer (spencerinthegorge AT yahoo DOT com) on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 02:48:02 PM EST
Yep, that's one reason I have to pay to get a tree taken down on our Austin rental property. When we lived there, tree-hugger me religiously watered the trees.

Also one of the reasons we're putting the house up for sale in March.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher

by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 03:27:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
in Austin, March would be the month. Any Bluebonnets at your place?

paul spencer
by paul spencer (spencerinthegorge AT yahoo DOT com) on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 03:31:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Nary a one, but they do let the wildflowers grow unchecked and it's quite beautiful.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Tue Dec 4th, 2012 at 02:13:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The drought is moving from a crisis to a disaster.  Winter wheat crop is looking grim.

"The crop is already dying in some fields from the lack of rain," Alan Brugler, the president of Brugler Marketing & Management Inc. in Omaha, Nebraska, said in a telephone interview before the report. "Crops survived the dry weather last year because there were surplus soil-moisture reserves. The crop is more susceptible to wind and cold damage this year because of the poor conditions."


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 03:36:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Stumbling and mumbling: ECONOMISTS AS DENTISTS (November 23, 2012)
Is the "crisis" in economics one of the content of the discipline, or rather of its social function? I ask because of a point made by Ronald Coase:
The degree to which economics is isolated from the ordinary business of life is extraordinary and unfortunate (hat tip to Paul).
It's certainly unfortunate, because the economics that can help people with the "ordinary business of life" is actually thriving.As I've said in the IC, there's a tremendous amount economics can offer to investors.We know the distribution of asset returns and therefore their risks. We know the cognitive biases that can lead to widespread poor investment performance, and we can both quantify their effects and identify some of the stock market anomalies they generate. And we know about the maths of how to diversify. All this, and more, allows us to give useful investment advice.

...

But is it even logically possible to foresee the future? G.L.S Shackle thought not, because individuals' choices, which are what determine economic outcomes, are not forecastable - and his argument has been ignored rather than rebutted. And Gary Gorton has said that "Financial crises are not predictable", in part because they arise from cascade-type behaviour which cannot be foreseen.

...

Instead, I suspect there's another reason why economics is thought to be in crisis. It's because, as Coase says, (some? many?) economists lost sight of ordinary life and people, preferring to be policy advisors, theorists or - worst of all - forecasters.

For some reason, I don't find "economists as inverstment advisors" all that useful. Surely the problem is not that economists tried to advise policy, but that they did from scientifically unsound and ideologically motivated positions.

And the post tries to sell us a Keynes that would have been content with being an investment advisor, which he clearly wasn't.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 04:01:30 PM EST
Here's the post by Ronald Coase: Saving Economics from the Economists (Harvard Business Review, December 2012)
Economics as currently presented in textbooks and taught in the classroom does not have much to do with business management, and still less with entrepreneurship. The degree to which economics is isolated from the ordinary business of life is extraordinary and unfortunate.

...

In the 20th century, economics consolidated as a profession; economists could afford to write exclusively for one another. At the same time, the field experienced a paradigm shift, gradually identifying itself as a theoretical approach of economization and giving up the real-world economy as its subject matter. Today, production is marginalized in economics, and the paradigmatic question is a rather static one of resource allocation. The tools used by economists to analyze business firms are too abstract and speculative to offer any guidance to entrepreneurs and managers in their constant struggle to bring novel products to consumers at low cost.

...

Economics thus becomes a convenient instrument the state uses to manage the economy, rather than a tool the public turns to for enlightenment about how the economy operates. But because it is no longer firmly grounded in systematic empirical investigation of the working of the economy, it is hardly up to the task. During most of human history, households and tribes largely lived on their own subsistence economy; their connections to one another and the outside world were tenuous and intermittent. This changed completely with the rise of the commercial society. Today, a modern market economy with its ever-finer division of labor depends on a constantly expanding network of trade. It requires an intricate web of social institutions to coordinate the working of markets and firms across various boundaries. At a time when the modern economy is becoming increasingly institutions-intensive, the reduction of economics to price theory is troubling enough. It is suicidal for the field to slide into a hard science of choice, ignoring the influences of society, history, culture, and politics on the working of the economy.



I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 04:06:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think part of the problem is that Mr Dillow (author of the original post) has been infected with ideologically motivated and unsound Hayekian theory that suggests that too much us unknowable to create useful policy advice.
by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Tue Dec 4th, 2012 at 02:28:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by stevesim on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 04:17:22 PM EST
Ilunga

Tshiluba (Southwest Congo) - A word famous for its untranslatability, most professional translators pinpoint it as the stature of a person "who is ready to forgive and forget any first abuse, tolerate it the second time, but never forgive nor tolerate on the third offense."
Read more at http://matadornetwork.com/abroad/20-awesomely-untranslatable-words-from-around-the-world/#xYdqXzjGHl 537Zva.99

by stevesim on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 04:43:47 PM EST
Presseurop: Hague verdicts stoke old war feud (3 December 2012, TYGODNIK POWSZECHNY, Poland)
Although it's been more than two weeks since the acquittal of the Croat generals Ante Gotovina and Mladen Markač - accused of committing war crimes during the Serb-Croat war in the 1990s - emotions in the region have continued to run high. Each side explains their release differently; for the Serbs, it is a scandal and yet more proof of the anti-Serbian bias and one-sidedness of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY). For the Croats, the ruling came as confirmation of the legitimacy of Operation Storm, which took place in the summer of 1995, when Croatian forces retook much of the territory previously seized by the Serbs, and a triumphal victory in an ongoing Balkan dispute: who was the victim in the war and who the aggressor.

...

The acquittal and subsequent release of Gotovina - who is a national hero - and Markač, was received with extraordinary enthusiasm in Croatia. In most cities the reading of the Hague verdict was broadcast live on large screens in public places. Many viewers prayed silently in anticipation of the ruling. After the acquittal, the madness began. Veterans cried openly, and so did the women and the war-wounded.

...

Everyone was surprised, though, by Ante Gotovina's comment, when he was asked by the Belgrade tabloid daily Kurir if he himself would call upon Serbs to return to Krajina: "How can I call upon anyone to return to their own home? It's their home! They [Serbs] are citizens of Croatia. They are with us. We are together. We must go on. The future belongs to us. The past is past."

Gotovina's public statements visibly distancing himself from the most belligerent and nationalist elements in politics and popular culture are leaving the right wing puzzled. Now even some start calling Gotovina himself a traitor. Meanwhile, Serbian government rhetoric and diplomacy have hardened substantially.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Dec 3rd, 2012 at 04:55:55 PM EST


Display:
Go to: [ European Tribune Homepage : Top of page : Top of comments ]