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Weekend Open Thread

by afew Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 11:42:53 AM EST

Weekend thread open


Display:
Here it is.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 11:43:44 AM EST
you need a fanfare.
by stevesim on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 11:46:44 AM EST
So, having done several weeks of work in a couple of breweries, I decided that, with the onset of cold wet icy days, I'd had enough of being a dogsbody either being frozen stiff and dripping wet or just doing repetitive tasks till my muscles ache with tedium.

Still, one of them has invited me in to do a day's proper brewing, which is what I wanted. So I'll go in for that next week.

So today has been spent just recovering from work knowing that no more is in sight for a bit.

It is actually quite worrying in that I'm starting out on a physically difficult career at the wrong end of my working life. I'm carrying all sorts of aches pains, injuries etc which restrict my strength and mobility so that, even if I can do much of the job, I end the day absolutely exhausted and without the youth that allows me to bounce back readily.

Still, a lack of jobs in something normal is making me do desperate things

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 11:54:45 AM EST
%here are things that can be done about those aches and pains and less energy.

Try amino acid alanine or BCAA for endurance.

Try turmeric and other anti-inflammatory food for pain.

It works for me. (especially alanine) I just starting jogging again.

I also found that calcium was really necessary for me to avoid some aches in my muscles.

Experiment and see what works for you.

by stevesim on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 11:59:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
that's amino acid alanine and branched chain amino acid complex BCAA
by stevesim on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 12:02:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I already take glucosamine and chondritin, fish oil for joints. But nothing is going to stop my left knee deteriorating, the cartilage is going and when I bend down I can feel bone against bone inside the joint.

I'll have a look out for the amino acids tho'.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 12:24:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
hmm.  is this athlete's knee as they call it? where the knee cap hurts because of bad positioning? if so, strengthening the quads can help a lot.

so many people give up on exercise for the wrong reasons.

alanine really, really helps.  I highly recommend it to give you a lot more energy and vigour.

D-phenyl-alanine is different and is used for pain relief.

by stevesim on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 12:31:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't think it's just the knee cap, my leg angles sideways at the knee. If I put my knees together, my feet will be 20 cm apart. So the cartilage on the outside of the knee joint takes all the strain and has been worn away.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 12:44:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
have you tried orthotics?  you know, shoe inserts.  they are very good for such problems.  
by stevesim on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 12:49:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Seriously.  Have yourself evaluated by an orthotics specialist which is probably covered by NHS and they will have custom made orthotics made for you which will help rebalance your knees.
by stevesim on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 03:35:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A long time back I went to the doctor about my knee and was referred to a specialist who more or less said I was screwed and should just hang on until I needed a knee replacement.

There was no suggestion of remedial treatment or orthotics. Just take glucosamine and chodritin till I couldn't walk.

Welcome to the NHS

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 03:44:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There are assholes in every profession.  The proper medical term for your condition is genu valgum and orthotics really can ameliorate your paine and lessen the wear on your cartilage.

I have had bad doctors in every country I have lived in, and good ones too.  

by stevesim on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 04:06:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]

It's hard to gauge the long-term effects of being exposed to these harsh occupations. Looking at NFL players provides another way to get at long term effects. In fact I used the very short average career--3-5 years--of NFL players as a way to estimate Batman's longevity in Becoming Batman.

Skilled writer Peter King provided an in-depth expose on football players in the Dec 12, 2011 issue of Sports Illustrated. This piece was a follow up look at 39 members of the 1986 Cincinnati Bengals--25 years later--and spanned all forms of injury. But it's the bodily injuries I want to focus on.

In the category of "residual injury" over 70% had at least one surgery during their careers with ~40% having a post-NFL surgery for an injury related to football. Thirty percent had an upcoming surgery. More than 90% of the players said that they had lingering issues arising from an injury derived from their NFL careers.

Probably the most telling "statistic" is that on average these players reported 3 parts of the body that experienced pain each day. That's a lot of injuries and a lot of discomfort.

Too much is...too much

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/2012/12/04/bumps-and-bruises-from-bruce-to-batman-and -beyond/



Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.
by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 03:11:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
My father did heavy physical labour until he was quite old.  He loved the physical aspect of his job and it certainly kept him in great shape. He really did not have any physical problems
by stevesim on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 03:27:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
i used to massage the siena basketball team, back in the 80's and they would tell me the price on their bodies of the sport.

larry bird, one of the greatest players ever, retired in his early thirties because as he put it: "when the permanent pain in my back met up with the permanent pain in my legs, i knew it was time to quit"

i knew it was my time to quit when they asked me to give pain-killing shots during the games.

there were a couple of NBA players, (longer than my table!) in their twenties who were paid $150,000 a month to sacrifice their present and future well-being in this way.

so many people with screwed up knees, i know the answer before they reply when i ask them if they were heavy into college football.

for a few hours, days or years of juvenile exaltation, decades of reduced mobility and pain. it's nuts.

i remember reading somewhere that ski-jumping and high diving had adverse effects on the brain, easy to believe...

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 04:34:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Here's a great article from a few weeks ago about a wannabe NFL player, right at the edge of eligibility. It is very disconcerting.

We are, as a society, re-enacting the Roman gladiators. It is brutal and exploitative beyond comprehension.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/25/magazine/the-hard-life-of-an-nfl-long-shot.html?ref=magazine&_ r=0

by asdf on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 01:12:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Basketball and tennis are terrible for the knees.  All that stop and go.

Football is a contact sport, so that is hardly comparable to physical labour.

If you look at the people who live the longest, including the people of Okinawa, you will find that it is not only their diet that prolongs their life, but the fact that they do physical labour.  One documentary I watched about it showed people in their 90's harvesting with the others up in trees.

by stevesim on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 03:33:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Man, that's a brutal story.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 09:35:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Take some time and write down what you learned during these weeks, write down what you found positive... because you've already documented the damage.

Only positive things. Then see where you are. Take the time, follow instructions, evaluate what these weeks have done to your bier professionalism. But first, only the positives.

If you can't think of any, take more time.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - AnaÔs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 04:12:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Positive;-
Rediscovering the dignity of work. it's been a long time since I felt I was making a positive contribution to a shared endeavor. So, even if it was a shitty job, I enjoyed that I was doing something which was valued.

I got to see up close what went on in a brewery and realise that, not only did you have to want to do that job to work in such an environment, but that I did feel it was something that I wanted to do. Something that I felt I should have been doing right from the beginning.

Yea, of course there are reservations and regrets and a certain realism about what I am likely to actually achieve, but I remain positive about this choice

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 08:59:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It's been my experience that the experts in physical rehab sometimes have better practical solutions to these sorts of challenges than do the MDs who are generally more focused on their operations, pharmaceuticals, etc, the area of their expertise.

NVA, a viable option when the political process fails.
by NorthDakotaDemocrat (NorthDakotaDemocrat at gmail dot com) on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 09:26:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
They did wonders for me. I just kept repeating what they told me to my primary care doctor to get more time authorized by Medicare. Spinal decompression therapy -> hydro therapy -> core strengthening exercises. Three one hour sessions/week for the first and second and then two and finally one hour per week for the exercises, which I repeated two to five times per week at home. We really do have a gem of a physical therapy department at our hospital.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 01:11:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Some of the success stories I've heard are pretty crazy. My favorite, told to me by my cousin's husband, was the guy the MDs told, "You'll never walk again."

He'd been caught in a farm tractor PTO, which is one of the nastiest accidents one can have for spinal injuries.

Well, the MDs were in Bismarck, the rehab in Grand Forks. I forget the time span involved, several months or more... but...

The end result was the guy walked (with crutches and likely not a pretty gait, but under his own power) into that Bismarck hospital/clinic to a cafeteria where the MDs were eating.

I guess they about peed their pants!

NVA, a viable option when the political process fails.

by NorthDakotaDemocrat (NorthDakotaDemocrat at gmail dot com) on Mon Dec 10th, 2012 at 01:42:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Washington's Blog | Top Economist: Iceland Did It Right...And Everyone Else is Doing It Wrong.

EuroTrib: Get your news three years early.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 11:57:00 AM EST
Changing the oil on the Fiat again today.  Going to try not to cut the shit out of my wrist on the undercarriage this time.

I'll be so glad when there are enough of them on the road that I can trust the local oil change guys have enough experience to do it.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 12:18:16 PM EST
Ah, user serviceable cars. I remember them. Open the bonnet on most cars these days and you face a whole load of "customer interference invalidates warranty" type warnings

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 12:21:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Unlerss the car is somewhat older than the warranty, y'know.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 03:07:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Practice makes perfect.

The main problem on my little Honda is that the underside of the car is covered by an aerodynamic shield, which has to be removed before you can even see the oil filter. And it has about 10 cm of ground clearance, so you have to jack it up before you can even see the shield.

Then all it takes is the correct special filter cartridge tool and very skinny arms, and 45 minutes later, you're done.

by asdf on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 01:17:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That sounds a bit like mine.  You have to remove the skid plate to get access to the drain plug.  I have little ramps that I drive it up to get the ground clearance.

The filter is in front on the passenger side, jammed in between the radiator and headlight, behind a hose.  It was a lot easier the second time, but still a stupid design.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 08:07:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Those responsible for the design of the engine compartment should be required to spend one day a month, at full pay, doing routine maintenance on randomly selected vehicles for which they had design responsibility. Then serviceability would drastically improve.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 01:15:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Hint: The factory builds cars to sell as new, which means that optimizing assembly at the factory is their goal. They couldn't care less about what the dealerships and maintenance people have to put up with. When was the last time you saw the cost of an oil change listed as a reason to buy or not buy a particular model?
by asdf on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 01:23:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I give you the Ford Windstar (?) van. My brother, who has a chassis and alignment business in Tuscon, had one in the 80s - and he had a lift. It was necessary either to pull the engine or drill access holes in an inner fender wall in order to change the spark plugs! That sort of problem will certainly tank the resale price if word gets out.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 07:08:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I didn't realize Windstars had any resale value. ;)

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Mon Dec 10th, 2012 at 09:06:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Certainly not by now! I do know that my brother advised any who asked against them.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Dec 11th, 2012 at 02:31:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I've never heard of anything but trouble with four- and six-cyllinder Fords of that era, and Windstars were always said to be the worst of the worst.  But minivans were always a Chrysler thing.  Ford was really good at building V8s back then, and Crown Vics and Mustangs always seemed to hold up fairly well.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Tue Dec 11th, 2012 at 07:31:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
My mother had a 70 or 71 Ford Maverick that was not too bad a car. It lasted until the early '80s and only died because an 80 year old woman had a stroke coming down the hill on Los Feliz Blvd. and rear ended her at about 40 to 50 mph as she was stopped in traffic at the Riverside Drive light in evening traffic. She recovered from the accident and there was no gas tank fire, thankfully. And that car was maintainable, even by me, for lots of things. It had an inline 6 and got about 18 mpg under good circumstances, which was not too bad for the time.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Dec 12th, 2012 at 02:40:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That was still kind of the Golden Age of American cars though.

And inline-6s are damned-near unkillable.  Ideally it'd be an AMC 4.0 or a BMW, but a Ford will work.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Wed Dec 12th, 2012 at 07:04:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I owned a '69 Maverick once, and later a '67 Chevy Impala. Both were good cars. Even though both were red and acted as absolute cop magnets. I suppose it may have had something to due with my pedal to the metal approach back then too.
by sgr2 on Sat Dec 15th, 2012 at 11:23:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Never too late to confess, sister.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Dec 15th, 2012 at 11:25:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Of course.

I did realise, waking from a dream last night, that I had fibbed--getting my steeds confused. It was actually a Mustang, not a Maverick. Still a Ford though.

by sgr2 on Sun Dec 16th, 2012 at 08:49:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
on Madame's little renault yesterday. An extraordinary amount of cursing for such a trivial job.

I wonder if they award prizes to the designers for inventive ways of frustrating the non-specialist.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 04:37:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
No. Low performance in this category leads to harassment followed by firing.

Incentives are all for the wealth-creators at the top.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 04:47:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I am preparing for a job interview on Wednesday for testing embedded software for a robot that does medical blood tests.
by stevesim on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 12:33:15 PM EST
Good luck!
by Katrin on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 12:50:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thank you.

I would really like this job.

by stevesim on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 01:09:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
But get it wrong and you'll release an army of blood sucking vampire robots on an unsuspecting humanity

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 01:25:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
bwa ha ha ha ha!
by stevesim on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 01:45:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 01:54:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
What part of humanity are you particularly thinking of?
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 03:08:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Killer vampire robots are inherently cool.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 12:46:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Who needs solar when you have girl-power - from Telethon in Nice

a-girlpower-nice-xmas-2012-02385

Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.

by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 03:30:09 PM EST
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 03:38:48 PM EST
Damn. Apparently .gif's don't work on Facebook.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 04:51:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
What's impossible about that?

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 06:34:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I suppose if you think a rotating wood screw is impossible, then this is equally so...
by asdf on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 01:19:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Because i've learned it's a Pogues song written by Kirsty MacNichol, and it's just so christmas (from the reality perspective).

Fairytale of New York



"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - AnaÔs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 04:15:29 PM EST
And you have to love Turid, at the end, saying, "We don't know what we're singing."

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - AnaÔs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 05:09:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's a cracking version. I kinda imagine that Sven looked like Mr Caplan before I'd met him

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 05:48:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No, Kirsty McColl did not write the song. Shane McGowan and another Pogue (Jem Finer I think) spent two years worrying over it until it was finished. By then, bass player Cait  O'Riordan who was to sing the female role, had left the band (eloped with Elvis Costello who had produced the classic "Rum, sodomy and the lash"). McColl got the gig because she was the wife of their current producer, Steve Lillywhite. ("First Lord Nerlson's sunken ships, now Steve Lillywhite's drunken mix") She was a major artist in her own right, and it's rather ironic that she's best known for this song rather than her own work.
I saw her do the song with the band in Lyon many years ago.

But yeah that's a kick-arse version and I gravely thank you for posting it.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 03:54:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 04:36:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Wow. That was good.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 04:23:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]

via dKos

Wind power

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 04:35:21 PM EST
I know that nothing, for example social problems, is simple... except for messages. Nicht schlecht, merci.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - AnaÔs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 05:00:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
One of the more effective cartoon videos I've ever run across, especially relative to the topic at hand.

NVA, a viable option when the political process fails.
by NorthDakotaDemocrat (NorthDakotaDemocrat at gmail dot com) on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 09:18:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh, and, some of my facebook folk are going to have great fun spreading that one around.

NVA, a viable option when the political process fails.
by NorthDakotaDemocrat (NorthDakotaDemocrat at gmail dot com) on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 09:19:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]

a-guy-xmas-tree-nice-2012-02360

Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.
by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 05:40:49 PM EST
Monti has declared this evening he will resign his office as soon as the budget legislation is passed. That should be by the end of the year. He arrived at his decision after Angelino Alfano withdrew his party's support of the government coalition. Alfano acted at the behest of his owner, Silvio Berlusconi, who has announced that Italy must once again be saved.

History is but an interminable sequence of farce, imposture, insolence and stupidity that occasionally turns to tragedy.

by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 06:09:54 PM EST
What guarantees that Buresqueoni and Alfano will support the budget?

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Dec 8th, 2012 at 06:32:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You took the worry right out of my mind. As of now Berlusconi will adopt a burn and destroy tactic to see how many legions he has. There's going to be a lot of defections of which many will be mercenary. They're just putting a price on their support.

Whatever, as is, Berlusconi does not have the numbers in parliament to block the annual budget law or stability pact. What he can do is delay it with procedural tactics until the last minute. At present there is a majority without him. It's just a matter of realpolitik: it's no use to waste time to seek a new majority at the end of the legislature. Monti still has the numbers unless Berlusconi buys up some Senators (It will be very difficult to do so in the House of Deputies.)

What is important for him is to kill all the reforms that would have seriously disadvantaged him in the next elections, such as the bill to prohibit individuals condemned of crimes to be appointed to either house. And of course I use the word "appointed" to once again make it plain that, with the actual electoral laws, MPs are not chosen by the electorate but by party bosses based on factors that have nothing to do with the ethics of politics. And of course we will be called to "vote" with his electoral law, the Porcellum. If there ever were grounds to argue that democracy is not synonymous with elections- and I can assure you that there are- the actual Italian electoral law is one.

It will further be important to count his legions within the RAI to see just how much clout he has in the state strategic media beyond his monopoly of the private strategic media.

His optimum goal is to see the elections held in mid-March as I suppose his strategists feel he will have a good possibility of having a majority or a stalemate in "elections" held at that time. Monti instead wants the elections as early as possible for the same reason: to anticipate and compromise Berlusconi's electoral roadmap.

We are going to see a ruthless, hateful campaign drenched in victimism.

There is speculation that Monti may get into the electoral fray as he is irate.

Vendola has accepted to ally his party with Casini's center party to create a large center-left coalition.

It is likely Berlusconi will favour the electoral impact of  Grillo's movement so that he can easily buy their MPs up after the election, when necessary, just as he did with Di Pietro in two successive legislatures.

I feel that one of the most important acts that President Napolitano can do is to appoint Berlusconi Senator-for-life. I have said this before and I repeat it. It would throw a wrench into elections. After all, considering the important contribution organized crime has made to the Italian republic since its birth, it is only fitting that they should be represented with this distinction.  

by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 04:58:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
de Gondi:

Vendola has accepted to ally his party with Casini's center party to create a large center-left coalition.

It is likely Berlusconi will favour the electoral impact of  Grillo's movement so that he can easily buy their MPs up after the election, when necessary, just as he did with Di Pietro in two successive legislatures.

ah, i had wondered about di pietro's party, why he had attracted such pitiful company, yeah 'party of values', right.

such a disappointment, he deserved better, imo.

what do vendola and casini have in common, other than they're not grillo or berlusconi?

here we go again... going to be a fun scramble till march.

berlusconi was on tv clutching marroni's book to his chest for the cameras. nice try...

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 06:08:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
berlu and grillo both want to make hay on the common currency euro mismanagement.

reminds me of the teabaggers and OWS.

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 06:12:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]
this is what I will be reading next:

The Next 100 Years: A Forecast for the 21st Century By George Friedman
2009 | 274 Pages | ISBN: 0307475921 | EPUB | 4 MB

"Conventional analysis suffers from a profound failure of imagination. It imagines passing clouds to be permanent and is blind to powerful, long-term shifts taking place in full view of the world." --George Friedman

In his long-awaited and provocative new book, George Friedman turns his eye on the future--offering a lucid, highly readable forecast of the changes we can expect around the world during the twenty-first century. He explains where and why future wars will erupt (and how they will be fought), which nations will gain and lose economic and political power, and how new technologies and cultural trends will alter the way we live in the new century.
The Next 100 Years draws on a fascinating exploration of history and geopolitical patterns dating back hundreds of years. Friedman shows that we are now, for the first time in half a millennium, at the dawn of a new era--with changes in store, including:

    The U.S.-Jihadist war will conclude--replaced by a second full-blown cold war with Russia.
    China will undergo a major extended internal crisis, and Mexico will emerge as an important world power.
    A new global war will unfold toward the middle of the century between the United States and an unexpected coalition from Eastern Europe, Eurasia, and the Far East; but armies will be much smaller and wars will be less deadly.
    Technology will focus on space--both for major military uses and for a dramatic new energy resource that will have radical environmental implications.
    The United States will experience a Golden Age in the second half of the century.

Written with the keen insight and thoughtful analysis that has made George Friedman a renowned expert in geopolitics and forecasting, The Next 100 Years presents a fascinating picture of what lies ahead.

by stevesim on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 11:16:53 AM EST
George Friedman (born 1949 in Budapest, Hungary) is an American political scientist and author. He is the founder, chief intelligence officer, financial overseer, and CEO of the private intelligence corporation Stratfor.


I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 11:26:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Hmm, I believe there are some science fiction books I could recommend as being equally useful.

It's not that I don't think the writer isn't qualified to talk about issues 10 or 20 years out. But imagine writing in 1912 about the challenges of the 20th century. Within 2 years you'd have been dead wrong about everything and the mistakes would have multiplied from there

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 11:36:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I think it's going to be very funny.
by stevesim on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 11:38:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
An example from 1908:

The War in the Air - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The German aerial forces, and consisting of airships and Drachenflieger, attempt to seize control of the air before the Americans build a large-scale aerial navy. The Germans are unaware that the Chinese and Japanese have also been building a massive air force. Tensions between Japan and the United States, exacerbated by the issue of American citizenship being denied to Japanese immigrants, also lead to war. The "Confederation of Eastern Asia" (China and Japan) turns out to possess aerial forces, and their aircraft and tactics have been seen as a portent to the kamikaze of World War II. The United States therefore has to fight on two fronts: the Eastern and the Western, in the air as well on sea.

Bert Smallways is present as the Germans first attack an American naval fleet in the Atlantic, then bomb New York City into submission

Don't get me wrong, there are things that Wells imagination nails, like the problems of bombing a city into submission (gerilla soon starts to fire upon the German troops leading to punishment bombing) or how aircrafts would dominate sea battles.

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!

by A swedish kind of death on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 12:51:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
He also, famously, advocated tanks as weapons to obsolete trench warfare - around 1908, IIRCC.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 01:30:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Reminds me of this.
by Katrin on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 01:00:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
not bad at all.
by stevesim on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 01:14:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
 "UK's Observer adds "kill Jews" to Hamas leader Khaled Meshal's Gaza speech when he did not say it"
Yesterday, I posted a passage about "killing" from the speech that Khalid Mish`al gave in Gaza.  It was from the Observer (the sister paper of the Guardian) in the UK.  Comrade Electronic Ali read the passage in question and was not convinced because he heard the speech on TV.   We looked for the original Arabic text of the speech and comrade Electronic Ali was correct.  He wrote this story on the matter.

angryarab.blogspot.com

by stevesim on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 12:36:14 PM EST
Good catch

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 12:44:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
they fixed it - changed it to "we fight the Jews because they are Zionists" instead of "we kill the Jews"

and the Observer reports

* This article was amended on Sunday 9 December 2012 to correct a mistranslation in a quote by Meshaal.

by stevesim on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 01:36:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
relativistic baseball

what-if.xkcd.com/1/

by stevesim on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 01:19:10 PM EST
link

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 01:53:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Krugman blog: Rise of the Robots (December 8, 2012)
If this is the wave of the future, it makes nonsense of just about all the conventional wisdom on reducing inequality. Better education won't do much to reduce inequality if the big rewards simply go to those with the most assets. Creating an "opportunity society", or whatever it is the likes of Paul Ryan etc. are selling this week, won't do much if the most important asset you can have in life is, well, lots of assets inherited from your parents. And so on.

I think our eyes have been averted from the capital/labor dimension of inequality, for several reasons. It didn't seem crucial back in the 1990s, and not enough people (me included!) have looked up to notice that things have changed. It has echoes of old-fashioned Marxism -- which shouldn't be a reason to ignore facts, but too often is. And it has really uncomfortable implications.

But I think we'd better start paying attention to those implications.



I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 01:55:53 PM EST
It's stuff like this that has had me labelled a Marxist Leninist hard leftie by one of my right wing friends.

Still, glad Krugman is catching up. Give him a year or two and he'll be where we are now.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 02:08:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Add another remake of Les Miserables to the list.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 03:39:23 PM EST


"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 08:23:53 PM EST


"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sun Dec 9th, 2012 at 08:58:53 PM EST
I completed the text before scrolling the horses into view.

'Twas a very good thing I wasn't drinking anything at the time, as ROFLMAO.

NVA, a viable option when the political process fails.

by NorthDakotaDemocrat (NorthDakotaDemocrat at gmail dot com) on Mon Dec 10th, 2012 at 02:19:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Excitingly, the horses are throwing shadows, but the table and chairs don't

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Dec 10th, 2012 at 02:47:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That's just to fool the council.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Dec 10th, 2012 at 03:08:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]


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