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Wednesday Open Thread

by afew Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 12:56:09 PM EST

Roll out the barrel


Display:
This should go down better than gather ye rosebuds.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 12:56:38 PM EST
and what better way to roll out the barrel than wandering down to the old Spielfeld (a 10 minute walk) to watch old Werder playmaker Mesut Özil take on Franck Ribéry as 'Schland gets a visit from Les Bleus.

Well ok, drink a bier in front of the laptop screen.

I'm told that Johann Micoud played in the journalists match this afternoon.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

by Crazy Horse on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 01:08:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I wonder if Merkozy are together for this Friendly. I get the match doesn't mean anything, but if i was having an economic affair with the German Chancellor, the VIP Loge in Bremen has some very private nooks.

If i didn't love my bread and circuses, i would already have diaried at least three of metatone's articles.

what i wouldn't have given to see Johann Micoud play for Werder. At least i saw Diego at his height, and Mesut (he was of course nicknamed Messi by the team) before he became R. Madrid's playmaker.

There were all manner of blue clad people wandering the neighborhood. all while i was discussing the socializing of offshore wind risk with people who have 8 or 9 digits under discussion. and i can't afford a haircut.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

by Crazy Horse on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 02:21:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Good game!

Some of these Schleus are a bit young and naïve (I heard one of them had his 6th birthday today)

But the young frogs are coming along nicely.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 05:05:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
For sure. They showed themselves worthy of the world stage. Perhaps too many hard fouls. But they would have had more goals if not for Wiese's reaction time.

Lloris is also stellar. I most liked the young M'something. and the new trainer knows what he's doing.

Merkozy seemed to have met somewhere else.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

by Crazy Horse on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 05:48:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]

The reaction against this beer started the real beer revolution worldwide

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 01:22:17 PM EST
Not that I have any idea what you are talking about. I'd rather eat sandpaper than drink beer - except for two instances of 3 dl a year when I am very very thirsty.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 01:27:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A bit more trance-y



keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 01:38:20 PM EST
State and mafia take their cut as Italians develop gambling habit | World news | The Guardian

Last December a policeman in a small town near Rome put on a balaclava, kidnapped his neighbour's teenage son and demanded an €85,000 (£72,000) ransom.

Quickly tracked down and arrested by his fellow officers, he told them: "I'm up to my neck in debts - I lost everything at video poker."

Bizarre stories like this are popping up ever more often as Italians develop a serious gambling habit, last year wagering €80bn, up from €4bn a decade ago.

Takings winnings into account, Italians are now spending €304 a head annually, compared with €232 in the UK. "Italy has moved to the number one spot in Europe after overtaking the UK - which was in first place - in 2009," said Michael Haile, an analyst at Global Betting and Gaming Consultants.

The boom has been driven by the legalisation in 2004 of slot machines - there are now nearly 400,000 - which have overtaken lotteries, horses and football to account for more than half of today's total spending.

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 01:48:33 PM EST
I know of a few people who have lost everything after they developed a video poker gambling addiction - one was an architect, the other was a lawyer, and it's amazing how far these two in particular have fallen.

And it's not just video poker.  In one city where they opened a casino, many business people were losing their businesses after gambling debts.

It's a measure of how low we have fallen that governments are introducing these techniques to gather revenue.  And, these machines are designed to get and keep people addicted.  

by stevesim on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 02:03:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
So I've recently come across some fantastic articles I don't have time to diary...

No. 1:

interfluidity » Competitiveness is about capital much more than labor

Besides justifying labor-hostile monetary policy, unit labor costs are often trotted out to blame unreasonable wage expectations for troubled economies' "lack of competitiveness". For example, here's a chart published last year by Paul Mason (ht Paul Krugman):

We've covered this territory in discussion, but there are great graphs in this piece, helping explain why investment capital, not labour costs or worker flexibility is the core/periphery problem in Europe... and indeed beyond...

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 01:51:42 PM EST
Very good article!
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 03:17:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
no.2

We all know that the "free market" tends to inequality (and eventually catastrophe) but here's another academic piece of work demonstrating it...

What would the wealth distribution look like without redistribution? | vox - Research-based policy analysis and commentary from leading economists

What does the distribution of wealth look like in an economy in which all households have identical skills and patience, but there is no redistribution? This column argues that without some redistributive mechanism - either explicit in the form of government tax or fiscal policies, or implicit in the form of limited intergenerational transfers - the wealth in the economy tends to concentrate at the top.

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 01:53:43 PM EST
no. 3

On how small business and self-employment seem much more correlated with poverty and industrial decline or failure than success:

(quote from the middle of the piece - go look at the graph which doesn't seem to paste over today...)

The Odd Job Society | Flip Chart Fairy Tales

An OECD paper published at the end of last year noted that high levels of self-employment are a feature of less affluent economies:

In general, self-employment rates are highest in countries with low per capita income although Italy, with a self-employment rate of around 25.5%, is an exception.

Self-employment rates: total As a percentage of total employment

So Luxembourg, Norway and the USA have low levels of self-employment while those of Mexico, Greece and Turkey are much higher. Outside the OECD the levels are higher still with over 30 percent on average in Latin America. It comes as a surprise, especially to Americans, to learn that America is not a small business country, but it shouldn't. Most rich countries aren't.

That's not to say that self-employed people make a country poor. It's the other way round. Poor countries have a lot of self-employed people because their economies can't create enough full-time jobs. While self-employment may be a lifestyle choice for some, it is all too often Hobson's choice for many more.

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 01:56:19 PM EST
that's certainly what's driving my conversion to self-employment. I'm not entrepreneurial at all and the idea scares me more than a bit cos I tend to get a bit deer in the headlights when confronted with officialdom and financial obligations, but what choices are there left ?

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 02:18:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I tend to disagree with those figures.

The place where I grew up used to be full of entrepreneurs.  everyone had a business and people did rather well, or at least, that's how I remember it.

now, I see everyone employed by chain stores, making minimum wage, and all the little shops have closed.
perhaps people are not shopping in the mom and pop stores anymore, but when I hear the guy in the coffee shop downstairs say that he clears 6k € a month, while his employees make the SMIC, I know that these figures must be skewed.

by stevesim on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 02:49:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
no. 4

What should be the final nail in the  coffin of UK hyper-euroskeptics who dream of EU withdrawal - but of course won't be, because the media are happy to keep giving them oxygen. Well worth reading the whole thing:

What would Britain outside the EU look like? | EuroDale

In early 2010, the Norwegian government with the approval of the Norwegian Parliament gave a mandate to a special committee to investigate every aspect of Norway's relationship with the European Union (EU). The main focus was to be on the European Economic Area (EEA)-agreement, but also other agreements, such as Schengen, was to be included. In mid-January 2012, the so-called European Committee handed over their report "Inside & Outside" to Norwegian Minister of Foreign Affairs Jonas Gahr Støre. The document, formally named "Official Norwegian Reports NOU 2:2012" drew some conclusions that are worth noting for anyone dreaming of a British withdrawal from the European Union.

...

In return for implementing all EU policies, Norway gets access to the Single Market. Excellent, one might say, this proves that the economy does not suffer from leaving the EU, even if democracy does. Again, the report is not quite so optimistic. True, having access to the Single Market through the EEA-agreement benefits the economy greatly, but not as much as a full membership of the EU does. This is assumed to have two explanations. First, the EEA-agreement only grants access to specific areas of the Single Market and any part of the economy that is left out, in the case of Norway agriculture, suffers from having to limit itself to the national market. Second, the EEA-agreement, and indeed any alternative to EU-membership, involves a greater uncertainty for business than a full EU-membership does. Uncertainty in the economy is bad for business and detracts investment. The numbers show that if it wasn't for Norway's vast oil resources its annual deficit would be tantamount to that of Greece. A sobering thought to anyone who sees Norway as a shining example of independence, politically and economically.

It is important to note here that this is not a matter of the EU bullying Norway into doing anything it doesn't want. The report points out that it is actually the other way around. Whenever the EU comes up with a new initiative, Norway is at the door begging to be part of it. This has been true for dozens of policies, as well as the EU task-force and the EU's cooperation on justice. For the EU, good relations with any outside country is nice. For any outside country, good relations with the EU is essential. This creates such an imbalance in favor of the EU that being an European outside country you are left with the choice of becoming an integrated or becoming irrelevant. Any country with any self-respect would prefer integration to irrelevance, and that is reflected in Norway's relation to the EU.

And to those who think Norway is exempt from contributing to the EU's budget - think again. The EEA-agreement also has a membership fee and Norway also has to contribute to the EU's regional and structural funds.

That is where to fairy tale ends. The report is a story of how nation-states cannot escape globalization, how dependent Europeans are on one another and how some problems are simply so trans-national that national sovereignty renders the nation-states powerless to deal with them. British Eurosceptics would do well to remember this before doing something their nation may regret for a long time to come.

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 01:58:17 PM EST
Thesis:  There are only two basic competitive advantages a nation-state has viz-a-viz other nation-states:

  1.  Extraction industries: oil, ore, agriculture, timber, fisheries, etc.

  2.  Creative industries: generation and exploitation of knowledge and information

The first is basically "physical stuff" such as geology, geography, and eco-system.

The second is basically "an attitude" such as the value the culture of the nation-state places on education, the level of tolerance granted to those not of the majority, willingness to dynamically balance What-Is and What-Could-Be ... and so on.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 02:20:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
antithesis: the world is splitting into 4 sectors, Asia, Russia, the Americas, * and... either a collection of motley princedoms wasting much energy on petty distinction and regional frictions as we have for centuries, or a collected Europe which can stand at the same level, united, as the other blocs.

synthesis: world government built on the european model, with asian levels of consumption.

so this is just a rehearsal for the ultimate step. 50-100 more years at this rate, and only if Europe doesn't revert to its traditional and wasteful bickering and unite better.

all bets off on that one right now. popular commitment has been damaged by the democratic deficit regarding financialisation, and will continue to be damaged as long as the sado-monetarism continues.

but if you ask the average european they will still want the privilege of belonging in the union, at a gut level they intuit the truth of the antithesis.

we're waiting on leaders worthy of leading a genuine european union, and so far we have come up short, all hostages to the 1%'s interests.

* Africa? best off in a future Europe perhaps? bit late probably, too much clumsy colonialism under the bridge...

europe is encrusted in its own historical self-regard, exemplified in my semisnarky suggestion of a world governed by the best of enlightenment principles as embodied here.

so europe has a hard time dealing with global changes, there's an entitlement that the chinese for example do not feel. we are anything but nimble, but what really slows us down is the lack of a common language (huge improvement here these last 10 years), and the provincialism of european nationalisms, still too focused on our (very real) differences, and not enough on the positive aspects of putting them aside and getting on with being a strong union.

which is certainly being severely undermined by the separatist policies of current financial arrangements.

it seems intuitive that a common progressive energy policy is the fastest way from the fractious, wasteful A to a small-footprint, respectful-of-neighbours B.

 

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 05:16:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I need to think about this.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 05:57:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
we all do...

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Tue Mar 6th, 2012 at 05:17:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Independent - Matthew Norman - Let us never forget the stench of this rank corruption

This brand of corruption is subtler. No one at Wapping had to set up bank accounts to feed wodges of wonga to Michael Gove via his family (though his wife earns from The Times). But there is something properly unsettling about the Education Secretary's spurious attack on Leveson for creating "a chilling atmosphere" which menaces freedom of expression.

Mr Gove, the former Times journalist whose talent for making fancy friends renders him the Cabinet's Sadie Frost, remains close mates with his erstwhile proprietor. He wrote last week that "whenever anyone sets up a new newspaper... they should be applauded and not criticised". In a tough, no nonsense counterstrike, Rupert informed his Twitter followers of Michael's "admirable character". Mr Murdoch, whom Govey has lauded for encouraging the "free thinking" so evident from The Sun's lavish Leveson coverage, is keen to break into the lucrative online education market. Mr Gove might be a handy ally there, while Rupert still isn't such a shabby pal for an ambitious minister already been obliged, by the adulation he received in Murdoch titles, to issue the ritual disclaimer about leadership ambitions.

I have the weirdest feeling that we've been here before with this symbiotic relationship... that we once came to regard the Murdoch-government axis as far more insidiously lethal than papers putting coppers and MoD officials on retainers. So, even now, with Leveson unearthing all manner of disgrace and the Feds on News Corp's case, it feels a bit previous to be celebrating the rupture of his political influence. Like Davros (Dr who villain), whose dead ringer he ever-more uncannily becomes, Murdoch has a knack of coming back from the dead, and twice as nasty as before.

This is quite a polemic. Norman better hope Murdoch dies, cos he's just put a target on his back

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 02:14:09 PM EST
Daniel Morgan Murder Cover-Up.: #Leveson Inquiry: Marunchak And Jonathan Rees - MP claims links between NoW and 1987 axe murder
MP Tom Watson's new claims about the News of the World and police corruption:

  • Daniel Morgan took police corruption story to News of the World a week before his murder
  • Police officers paid by NoW for information about the Soham murder case
  • Close links between NoW's Alex Marunchak and criminal private eye Jonathan Rees
Fresh questions have been raised in Parliament over links between former News of the World crime correspondent Alex Marunchak, a private investigator and one of the UK's most notorious unsolved murders.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 04:21:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Blimey, Davy Jones of the Monkees has caught the last train to Clarksville



keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 02:48:49 PM EST

Old friend of mine...

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 04:14:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 04:34:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Snob that I was, I was SO put off by the TV Sitcom aspect, and that at a time when I did not even own a TV, that I only came to appreciate the songs when they were covered by The Four Tops, of whom I said: "They turn Monkey shit into gold!" This earned me dirty looks and a reproof from acquaintances of Michael Nesmith in The Stone Poneys, whose first big hit was a Mike Nesmith song, Different Drum. In time I grew more tolerant of what people do to succeed in the music biz.  

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Fri Mar 2nd, 2012 at 03:20:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
People Aren't Smart Enough for Democracy to Flourish, Scientists Say.

The democratic process relies on the assumption that citizens (the majority of them, at least) can recognize the best political candidate, or best policy idea, when they see it.

Well, döh. I believe that a demonstration of knowledge and understanding of social issues should be a prequisite for holding the vote. Forget this one man, one vote nonsense. This filtration is not possible under existing election systems.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 03:19:41 PM EST
The democratic process relies on the assumption that citizens (if the majority is with them, at least) can violently change who the politicians in charge are, so it is better for all involved to measure who can rally up the masses the most by taking a vote.

Or as they used to say in the 19th century one man - one gun - one vote. As in (male) conscription and (male) democracy. Of course conscription has largely been abolished, so maybe it is time for democracy to follow.

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!

by A swedish kind of death on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 03:45:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Hell, I just wish that a demonstration of knowledge and understanding of social issues would be a prerequisite for holding the OFFICE.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Thu Mar 1st, 2012 at 08:08:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
This just in: Enlightenment philosophers discover the failure mode of their political project

Other news outlets give the headline: Enlightenment's utopian political project fails because people don't conform to its Theory of Man, scientists say

There are three stories about the euro crisis: the Republican story, the German story, and the truth. -- Paul Krugman

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Mar 1st, 2012 at 08:12:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I am trying to change the light bulb in my oven, but the glass that protects the lamp is stuck. Googling I find lots of frustrated people, but no solution.

So does the great minds here have a solution? I know Veblen would know...

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!

by A swedish kind of death on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 03:37:18 PM EST
Stuck how ? How is it attached ?

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 03:50:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
According to the manual you are supposed to simply unscrew it.

Except when it sits in an oven for who knows how long grease enters and is burnt into place. Or so I understand it.

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!

by A swedish kind of death on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 03:54:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Use a heavy industrial oven cleaner to get into that area as best you can, then use a penetrating agent WD-40 or such like, but remember you're really gonna have to clean the oven thoroughly after you've used it.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 04:04:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
WD-40 is flammable AND toxic.  Use not recommended in a stove.


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 04:07:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ignore comment, below.

First, degrease the area around the access point. Use an old toothbrush to get the degreasing compound underneath the lip - if there is one - and, hopefully, into the threads.

Second, GENTLY apply continuously increasing pressure and then maintain maximum pressure on the access point to unscrew the thing.  You'll get tired of that but it's the best procedure.  

You may need to iterate these two steps: use the toothbrush to work more degreasing compound, apply pressure, rinse, lather, repeat.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 04:05:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, that might work.

I sent them an email anyway (evening now in Sweden) on the off chance that there is some backdoor way that service technicians and the like know off.

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!

by A swedish kind of death on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 04:14:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
M'kay I set out to clean the access point and realised that the oven needed cleaning anyway. So now it is sitting with oven-cleaner stuff inside over night. Project lightbulb resumes tomorrow.

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!
by A swedish kind of death on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 04:36:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Industrial design is oriented towards ease of manufacture, not ease of service.  It is possible the protective covering is removable from the rear of the stove, you may have to remove a rear panel to get access.

Personally, I'd call the manufacturer or the manufacturer's rep in Sweden and ask them.  

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 03:57:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Guess I'll have to do that, because it is totally stuck.

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!
by A swedish kind of death on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 04:04:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I gave up a year ago. I decided the odds of breaking something were too high.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 04:55:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
How many Eurotribbers does it take to change a lightbulb?

(I counted four)

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 05:02:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
(and we haven't had success yet)

There are three stories about the euro crisis: the Republican story, the German story, and the truth. -- Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 05:06:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It doesn't matter - as long as the bulb is wind-powered.
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 06:07:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]

"But why?" I hear you ask...

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 04:06:49 PM EST

SWARM INTELLIGENCE!!!

(With a low value of "intelligent.")

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 04:10:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"But why?" I hear you ask...

I don't ask.  I know why.

cue: Portal Theme Song

Because we can.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 04:13:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And you're worried about when they're going to merge message and narrative?

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 04:17:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The "they" in a previous comment reference Film people, thus The Other.

These are My People¹

thus, melding Message and Narrative is automatic.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

¹  Or so I delude myself.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 04:30:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
If Hank were running in New Mexico, I'd vote for him!  

Hank for Senate

by ElaineinNM on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 04:32:15 PM EST
Interview with Michael Ratner right after news ... first
27:15

 http://www.democracynow.org/

Priceless!

The good news ... it's only a life sentence. You eventually leave this planet of idiots.

by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 04:49:40 PM EST


There are three stories about the euro crisis: the Republican story, the German story, and the truth. -- Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 05:13:53 PM EST
El Pais: Police fire warning shots as Barcelona university protests escalate
The demonstration in Valencia on Wednesday passed off peacefully, as did smaller protests in Madrid and Alicante. In Barcelona, however, the largest concentration descended into scenes of violence like those witnessed in Valencia two weeks ago. The Mossos d'Esquadra, Catalonia's regional police force, surrounded protesting students barricaded in the University of Barcelona campus in the center of the city at 3pm on Wednesday after running battles through nearby streets had left dumpsters and vehicles ablaze in their wake.

As the students retreated to the safety of the campus dozens of anti-riot vehicles appeared on the scene. The disturbances began when a march through the city in protest against planned budget cuts by the Catalonia regional government reached its destination, the Plaça Universitat, after a circle of the city center. Thousands of demonstrators had turned out for a day of strike action, called by the seven public universities in the Catalan capital. As the multitude descended on the square, some demonstrators threw stones at police, who responded with baton charges and even fired warning shots into the air with rubber bullets. At least three protestors were arrested, according to the students' union. A spokesman for the organization described the police's actions as "excessive and provocative."

Some 300 protestors also tried to storm the Mobile World Congress taking place in the city at the Fira de Barcelona but were deterred by a massive police cordon around the building.



There are three stories about the euro crisis: the Republican story, the German story, and the truth. -- Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 05:15:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
How many times do we have to go through this?  The students have deep and justified grievances.  Police escalating level of repression will do nothing but escalate the violence.  

 

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 at 05:27:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]


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