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Sunday Open Thread

by afew Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 11:10:28 AM EST

The Devil finds work for idle threads to do


Display:
Be afraid, be very afraid!
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 11:11:11 AM EST
It's Super Bowl Sunday here in the states, the most important religious holiday in the American faith.

Thinking...lots of nachos with some chili.  And beer.  Lots more beer.

Also: Go Giants!

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 11:35:01 AM EST
No nachos and beer this afternoon, but Wales pipped by Ireland at the last minute in Dublin to win 23-21, and that's worth something!
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 12:20:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And they were playing... basketball?

The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman
by dvx (dvx.clt t gmail dotcom) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 12:23:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Wassat?
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 12:28:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I was guessing rugby?

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 12:30:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I had to check Wikipedia for that "basketball" thing... Apparently players run to and fro and try to throw a ball through a hoop. Well, whatever turns you on.

Yes, rugby, Six Nations tournament.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 12:32:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think DoDo is the basketball fan 'round these parts.  Bit too fast a game, not enough strategy to it for my liking.

Although probably the best all-round athletes.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 12:40:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
DoDo's a sumo fan too. I'd like to see sumoka play basketball.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 12:42:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Two words: Shaquille O'Neal.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 12:48:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
</no argument from me>
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 01:28:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
He was a lot of fun though.  And amazing when he was young.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 01:50:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I do recall a photo of presently best sumo wrestler, yokozuna Hakuho (born Davaajargal Munkhbat in Mongolia), playing basketball in his free time. Unfortunately I couldn't find it (only found bios saying he tried basketball as a child).

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 05:32:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Not the photos I recalled but trawling in a sumo forum, I found a thread with photos of a basketball match involving all top Mongolian sumo wrestlers (including Hakuho) back in 2005.


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 05:57:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I used to play quite a bit of bball.  IMHO, it's more explosive force, i.e. spurts of energy that makes one a good player, although one has to be in good shape to last the whole game.

It's a fun game to play though not as much fun as ice hockey, and those players are the best athletes, I think.  

by stevesim on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 01:39:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes.  B-ball's a very streaky game.

I wouldn't put hockey in the same category on pure athleticism.  But I like it more than bball.  

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 01:53:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Having played both extensively, I would.  Ice hockey requires strength, balance, skill, endurance, ability to withstand  physical aggression, and speed in a way that basketball can never approach.  It's also a lot more fun to play.  A lot of fun. You cannot imagine.

And it's not the physical aspect of the game -  I have played a little lacrosse but it wasn't the same.  The speed and balance required for skating just puts ice hockey in a category of its own.

by stevesim on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 01:59:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think DoDo is the basketball fan 'round these parts.

'Fan' is pushing it... I played some basketball in highschool and sometimes watch it on TV (most of that during the Olympics) but that's all. I'm more into (association) football, ski jumping, snooker, sumo...

not enough strategy to it for my liking

I think Argentina and the European teams who beat US sides in world championships and the 2004 Olympics brought more strategy into the game, though no clue whether that had any effect on the NBA.

probably the best all-round athletes

Better than (association) footballers?

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 06:23:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well there were two teams that will stomp England to a paste (I have a feeling Italy will also break their duck this year against them) and if Scotland hadn't made a couple of errors I think they would have condemned England to the Wooden spoon

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 02:00:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I saw some Scotland, they were very exciting but lost possession too often. They should get a lot better. Italy against France were good, they get better every year.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 04:13:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Apparently, poemless is watching sunday football as well, Man Utd vs Chelski.

Quite exciting, Utd have fought back to 3-2 from 3-0 down and 10 mins to go.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 12:44:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
now you'll have to excuse me for half hour as I'm watching the end of Borgen

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 12:45:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That's not exciting.  That's horrible.  Utd is evil.  It's like roting for the Yankees or the Patriots or the Empire from Star Wars.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 12:49:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's a fair point, but as I hate Chelski far more than United I'm for Utd in that game (which ended 3-3).

At the top of the table it's Man City leading United by 2 points, then spurs, Chelsea and newcastle. I despise City and neither Spurs nor newcastle are quite good enough so we have to want United to win. It's not what I want, but it's enough

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 01:08:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Cheering for Utd over City is like preferring Alan Greenspan to Ben Bernanke...

Talk about least worst option...

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 02:30:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
yea, s'about it

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 02:35:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well after Noel Gallaghers outburst, anything to make him unhappy.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 03:05:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh, lord, what'd he say?

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 03:09:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
the sum total of everything he's said ever can be distilled down to "wah wah wah...city"

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 03:24:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Noel Gallagher praises Margaret Thatcher and claims Adele won't last | Metro.co.uk

The notoriously outspoken guitarist is unimpressed with the 'embarrassing' attitude of British public .

'Under Thatcher, who ruled us with an iron rod, great art was made. Amazing designers and musicians. Acid house was born. Very colourful and progressive,' Noel Gallagher told the Mail On Sunday.

The Oasis star went on to say 'it was a different mindset back then'.

'There was a work ethic - if you were unemployed, the obsession was to find work.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 03:27:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
What a tosser.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 04:17:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I doubt he even believes it.  He just loves being obnoxious.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 06:06:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
How is old poemless doing? God I miss her.

The good news ... it's only a life sentence. You eventually leave this planet of idiots.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 04:43:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Here in Norway one channel is showing several hours of 'two and half men' followed by a late live Super Bowl showing. The virus is spreading.
by Andhakari on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 02:53:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Who'd have thought?

...Gok Wan is a Leicester boy. Gok Wan is a fully licensed me duck or duckie.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 01:19:20 PM EST
Me Peking Duck.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 01:21:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Father from Hong-Kong, but we'll let it pass.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 01:24:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Actually had enough for dinner tonight, braised in my Wok Gan.

alternatively: i'll have what he's having.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anas Nin

by Crazy Horse on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 01:22:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh, and Sauli Niinistö will be the next President of Finland. Advance voting, announced at 20.03, went 65% in his favour. We saw a bounce for Haavisto in the last hour of the 1st round counting - as big cities completed counting - so it might be repeated, but it won't be enough. Game over.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 01:23:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Polls have been predicting Haavisto didn't have a chance, so no surprise.


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 01:26:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Not really. Hope springs eternal. But this election is going to change Finnish politics - the under 35s who strongly supported Haavisto are the same bunch who better understand social networking - in a variety of media. They got a taste for politics this time - having previously been content to just route around it.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 01:35:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Interestingly, Haavisto is almost neck and neck with Niinistö in Helsinki, 46 - 54%, with 53% counted. That late-count bounce I mentioned could make Haavisto the 'president of the capital' - his now disappointed backers (including me) will take that as a win.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 01:39:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Final national vote around 60/40 is my prediction, with Hki 50/50.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 01:53:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Add up the votes the Right got in 2011 and it's pretty close to what Niinistö is getting today.

Seems to me, as an outsider, the rural areas, small town, and urban elites (the industrial herrat, as it were) coalition formed during the Civil War still continues as the Ruling coalition.  

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 02:02:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Less an outsider, more standing in the doorway.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 02:08:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I try to face facts.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 02:20:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
About 8cm (3") of snow fell this morning in the South West of Paris. Good thing I got me some equipment back in May...
So I finally got to put the effing instrument to use, after digging it up from under the tomato stakes and other gardening tools I used over the summer and fall. At least our doorway and the sidewalk in front of the house are cleaned up.

More worrying is the temperature that hasn't got above the freezing point for about a week now, and is forecasted to remain so for yet another week. A water pipe for the washing machine has a tendency to freeze up when it gets cold for a long period of time so I'm watching it carefully; difficult to run water regularly since it's the washer's supply and there's no sink underneath: we plan to wash a load every day.

by Bernard on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 01:35:08 PM EST
Insulation?

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anas Nin
by Crazy Horse on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 01:40:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Done it wherever I could; trouble is, that part of the installation was done some years before and not well thought of: the pipe ends up stuck to the wall into a metal faucet that is screwed directly into the concrete (and the garden behind). New year's resolution: next summer works: move the pipe and faucet away from the wall.
by Bernard on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 02:24:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
We went down to an old town hotel breakfast this morning in -29 C!

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 01:42:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Amurka is really taking good care of Yurp. They scheduled the stupor bowl for midnight, so we can get a REM cycle in before kickoff.

Frage: why is it 4 grad in my apartment?  Antwort: close the windows, dork, even if you aspire to be German.  Fazit: wow, that sure is fresh air Gazprom Siberia sent us.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anas Nin

by Crazy Horse on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 01:38:22 PM EST
Hoping to watch a bit of the game tonight but I doubt I'll make it all the way

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 01:57:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]


"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anas Nin
by Crazy Horse on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 02:04:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
aaaargh
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 04:21:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The test for achieving Germanity is: do you take your shoes off in the house?

Ja order nein?


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 02:09:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Jein.


"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anas Nin
by Crazy Horse on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 02:13:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
no, the test for Germanity is "do you keep the inside temperature at 10 deg C in winter"?
by stevesim on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 02:44:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
These squanderers... first they want more than 10 degrees, then they want a bail out, and what is this about Hamburger?
by Katrin on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 03:08:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A 'humorous' reference to Pres. Kennedy's "Ich bin ein Berliner" ( = I am a jam doughnut.)

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 03:12:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
mmm.  Berliners.  
by stevesim on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 03:19:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
that's the German Homer Simpson
by stevesim on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 03:55:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
More cannibalism
by Katrin on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 03:44:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
What are they?  I don't recognize them.


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 03:49:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Cake with an overdose of sugar: Amerikaner.
by Katrin on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 03:51:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
If we're talking cake with an overdose of sugar, they are called "cupcakes" and you're doing it wrong:

THESE:

are cakes with an overdose of sugar.

(Guess you don't have access to much sugar in your forest hide-aways?)


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 04:03:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh these colours...
by Katrin on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 04:15:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
We have a full 15° in the house here, but we're in spendthrift France.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 04:23:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Isn't the test whether you go for a walk outside no matter what the weather is like? La Repubblica is impressed that the Pope (with a specific reference to his being German) is still going for his daily 30-minute walk in the Vatican gardens.
Anche se spera che "la primavera venga presto", come ha detto oggi all'Angelus dopo aver affermato che "la neve è bella", Benedetto XVI in questi giorni non ha mai rinunciato alle sue passeggiate pomeridiane nei Giardini Vaticani. Ben coperto, dunque, il Pontefice ha camminato - si apprende - per più di mezz'ora non solo ieri, come rivelato da un quotidiano, ma anche l'altro ieri e oggi. Del resto, si fa notare, a questa abitudine salutare il Papa tedesco non ha mai rinunciato nemmeno nelle giornate caldissime o durante i suoi molto impegnativi viaggi pastorali.
Interestingly, he "hopes", not "prays", that spring will come soon.
by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 03:07:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
in the podcast link I posted last week, they quote Tacitus as saying that the Germans are known for wearing very little clothing even in the coldest weather, and exposing as much skin as possible.

the podcaster compares them to motorcycle gang members.

http://hw.libsyn.com/p/a/7/1/a714ef73fcca0cc2/dchha41_Thors_Angels.mp3?sid=57bfcec8530ef444647e17bc6 7ae1cfa&l_sid=19573&l_eid=&l_mid=2872448&expiration=1328493967&hwt=1fc2728f8c179 c6a2

by stevesim on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 03:21:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
More German characteristics from Tacitus
Das ist der furor Teutonicus,
Von ihm berichtet schon Tacitus,
Kein Tisch bleibt ganz, kein Stuhl, kein Spind,
So oft Germanen gemütlich sind!
(Actually Rideamus, libretto for Straus' Die lustige Nibelungen)
by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 03:26:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
also known to be very democratic and egalitarian

freedom loving

but also tattoo loving, hard drinking, long hair worn in pony tails with parts of the skull shaved

no beards but mustaches even if born and raised in Rome

and lots of murder when drinking with their buddies, which was recognized as a legal defense.

considered women equals and asked for their advice on all matters

by stevesim on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 03:33:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Stop! I give up!
by Katrin on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 03:51:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
LOL
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 04:25:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
glad you brung it up, i wanted to thank you for the hardcore history link, very enjoyable!

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 06:18:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
you're welcome.  I love that podcast although I don't always agree with him.
by stevesim on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 04:15:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
i find his voice grating after a while, but his love for history and an easy vernacular lends some charm.

nice change of pace... i listened to the whole 4 hrs straight of thor yesterday...

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Tue Feb 7th, 2012 at 06:35:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I can spot a German by the glum look on his/her face. Glum or suspicious. Or maybe it's me and I just look like a menacing person to them.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 02:51:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It's easy: The people with the glum expression are the Bavarians.
by Katrin on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 06:11:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
But I'll be damned if I can figure out why.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 08:57:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Balloon juice - John cole - They Fucking Hate You

They fucking hate you. They want you, and everyone who speaks for you, and every institution that represents your values, whether it be Planned Parenthood or food banks or ACORN- you name it. They want it destroyed.

I just do not understand why more people do not recognize this. The Republicans have declared total war on America, and people are responding like this is politics as usual. It isn't. It really isn't. It's really all or nothing at this point. We put the birchers/tea party/conservatives back in their place and destroy the current GOP, or we deal with this shit for the next forty-sixty years.



keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 01:57:00 PM EST
This is how the hate is, on the ground.

Every morning, Brittany Geldert stepped off the bus and bolted through the double doors of Fred Moore Middle School, her nerves already on high alert, bracing for the inevitable.

"Dyke."

Pretending not to hear, Brittany would walk briskly to her locker, past the sixth-, seventh- and eighth-graders who loitered in menacing packs.

"Whore."

Like many 13-year-olds, Brittany knew seventh grade was a living hell. But what she didn't know was that she was caught in the crossfire of a culture war being waged by local evangelicals inspired by their high-profile congressional representative Michele Bachmann, who graduated from Anoka High School and, until recently, was a member of one of the most conservative churches in the area. When Christian activists who considered gays an abomination forced a measure through the school board forbidding the discussion of homosexuality in the district's public schools, kids like Brittany were unknowingly thrust into the heart of a clash that was about to become intertwined with tragedy.



Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 02:39:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes I read that yesterday, after which I desperately wanted to hurt something republican

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 02:50:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ground state of my existence.


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 03:19:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
there was one commenter on the RS thread that made me want to run screaming out into the snow.

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Tue Feb 7th, 2012 at 06:39:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Somebody who thinks like I do. Refreshing!

The good news ... it's only a life sentence. You eventually leave this planet of idiots.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 04:47:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Just found I had a long letter re funding an independent Scotland published in the Glasgow Herald last Monday....


Fiscal Ignorance should not be allowed to cloud the argument

Further to Kate Devlin's article on the Scottish budget veto, the amount of ignorance on the subject of national fiscal and monetary matters - extending right up to the top level of the UK Government - is quite staggering ("Scots budget veto threat to Bank of England plan", The Herald, January 28).

On the subject of currency and central banks firstly, Hong Kong has never had a central bank and their private banks - which are well capitalised because there is no HK lender of last resort - clear bank credit "real time", and issue bank notes. The Hong Kong Monetary Authority maintains monetary stability with a peg to the US dollar and a currency board backed by substantial assets, including significant capture of land rental value. The fact HK people do not have both landlord and government monkeys on their shoulders to the same extent as we do is undoubtedly a competitive advantage for that entrepreneurial territory.

Another approach is that of Ecuador, which is one of several countries which choose to use the US dollar as their currency but without intrusion from the US. While this does cause problems, they have been working on a very interesting idea whereby Ecuadorean businesses may access credit for working capital simply by discounting VAT invoices directly with the central bank. With such a credit clearing system, goods and services will change hands not in exchange for US dollars sourced from the US, but by reference to the US dollar purely as a standard unit of account or benchmark.

Those are a couple of examples of more or less conventional possibilities.

I advocate a simple but radical 21st-century version of the sovereign credit model which pre-dated modern central banking. Scotland could turn back the clock to 1693 when the then privately owned Bank of England first privatised public credit.

Sovereigns had for some 500 years funded public expenditure through issuing stock, which was simply undated credits or IOUs given to creditors in exchange for value received, and returnable in payment of taxes. The origins of the phrases "stock" and "rate of return" - which referred to the rate at which stock could be returned to the exchequer for cancellation against tax obligations - have long since been airbrushed from economic history as an inconvenient truth.

I advocate a new approach to stock creation and issuance, perhaps through basing professionally managed public credit issuance on taxation; or on Scottish land rental values, as proposed by John Law in 1705; or on the value of Scottish energy production; or even all of these.

I am sure Messrs Salmond and Swinney and their team could easily achieve monetary independence in this way.

etc etc



"The future is already here -- it's just not very evenly distributed" William Gibson
by ChrisCook (cojockathotmaildotcom) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 02:03:25 PM EST
Good on you.

The polling runes seem unclear on the desire of Scots for full independence - but it's so important that they make the decision knowing that they can make it work if they want to - despite the blasts of propaganda from various quarters suggesting the contrary.

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 02:34:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
speaking of hate:

Le ministre de l'intérieur, Claude Guéant, a réaffirmé dimanche 5 février que "toutes les civilisations ne se valent pas", confirmant ses propos controversés tenus la veille lors d'un colloque organisé par l'association étudiante de droite UNI à l'Assemblée nationale.

from the front page of Le Monde

the French Minister for the Interior said that not all cultures are worth the same.

by stevesim on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 02:03:44 PM EST
Interestingly, google translate ignores the "not" in the phrase not equal so it's hard to see why that was controversial


keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 02:33:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
sorry, I meant to translate, but forgot to do it.

blame the virus I have.

by stevesim on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 02:45:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Al Jazeera has alreadytranslated it.
by Katrin on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 03:01:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think we'll be hearing more of this type of fascist rhetoric from Sarkozy's team leading to the election, as they try to woo away LePen's voters.

It seems like Marine LePen is having trouble gathering the 500 signatures of mayors in order to be able to run as a presidential candidate as she was requesting that they be able to remain anonymous.

In the Le Monde article on this topic, Guéant also broaches this subject and doesn't seem very sympathetic to her cause.  

With LePen's 20% of the vote, Sarkozy could upset the Socialists and win the election.

by stevesim on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 03:09:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
in fact, they just put up a big article or two up on Le Monde just now about this topic
by stevesim on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 03:36:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Without Le Pen, Sarko gets a first-round boost, but her hard-core supporters stay home in the second round, accentuating his defeat.

The real victim if Le Pen drops out is Bayrou, who becomes irrelevant.

The attempted lockdown of right-wing mayors by the UMP is exceedingly undemocratic. Most village-level mayors are conservative but not aligned with a political party, so the only way to discipline them is to threaten the commune's funding.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 04:44:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I forgot to say, this is the Minister in charge of immigration for France!!
by stevesim on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 04:02:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I wonder who gets to make the decision about which ones have worth

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 02:34:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That's easy: NOT the Muslims...
by Katrin on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 02:36:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The civilisation that allows Guéant to be minister of the interior has no business giving lessons in civilisation.

In other news, we're appealing the immigration ruling. Should be a snap, but will probably take months. On reflection : we have two months to appeal. Perhaps best to leave it as late as possible, so that the ruling comes after the elections.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 04:47:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
...polluting the language of innocent Bavarian youth...

The Local: Bavarian school bars 'impolite' greetings

Principal Petra Seibert has declared the St. Nikola school a "'Hallo' and 'Tschüss'-free zone."

If students slip up, teachers are instructed to politely remind them to use the more polite Bavarian variants for hello and goodbye, "'Grüß Gott" and "Auf Wiedersehen."

The word "Tschüss," which is heard everywhere in cities like Berlin when people part ways, apparently has few fans in southern Germany.



tens of millions of people stand to see their lives ruined because the bureaucrats at the ECB don't understand introductory economics -- Dean Baker
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 03:26:25 PM EST
They speak a funny foreign language there in the south anyway.
by Katrin on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 03:36:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
and of course the very Bavarian " (Es)Ist gut?" for "hello"
by stevesim on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 03:37:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Is "Moin" allowed?
by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 03:44:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Moin is Frisian, not German. But then Tschüss is an import from France, even if the French won't believe it.
by Katrin on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 03:50:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Can you say "Tschuess Gott"?

tens of millions of people stand to see their lives ruined because the bureaucrats at the ECB don't understand introductory economics -- Dean Baker
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 04:22:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Hell, no.
by Katrin on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 04:25:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
But it would be fun to say it to Frau Petra Seibert.

tens of millions of people stand to see their lives ruined because the bureaucrats at the ECB don't understand introductory economics -- Dean Baker
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 05:19:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
She will probably have a nasty way of teaching you that it was a mistake to think it was fun.
by Katrin on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 05:31:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Anyone who happens to be on ARTE keeps saying Tschüss. It's some kind of ARTE shibboleth.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 04:32:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Wikipedia enlightens me that it is by no means certain that "tschüß" (formerly "atschüß") comes from the French adieu. It is also possible that the source is Spanish adiós or Portuguese adeus. Since all of them mean the same, it is probably not that important.
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tsch%C3%BCs

One thing is sure though: it isn't Prussian.

by Katrin on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 04:47:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Taking a quick look it derives from the Romance Languages that got it from late Latin?

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 05:10:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
What does Tacitus say about that?

tens of millions of people stand to see their lives ruined because the bureaucrats at the ECB don't understand introductory economics -- Dean Baker
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 05:13:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Dragging my memory, I guess he'd would have applauded "Latinization" as making the barbarians (sic) that much easier for Rome to dominate.


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 05:34:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Of all the barbarians [sic], it appears only the Bavarians indomitably hold out against the invaders.

tens of millions of people stand to see their lives ruined because the bureaucrats at the ECB don't understand introductory economics -- Dean Baker
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 05:37:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Not to put too fine a point on it ... Tactius knew as much about "Germans" (sic) as I do about Zulus.  (Which is to say, "Not a whole helluva lot.")

There weren't no Bavarians in Bavaria at the time.  IIRC the Hermunduri and Alemanni - hence the French name for them folks directly across the Rhine - were farting around in the Black Forest, at the time.  And it is a good question if a member of the Hermundari or Alemanni would have thought of themselves as Hermundari or Alemanni since the larger accumulations of "Germans" are a result of centuries of interactions, peaceful and combative, along the Frontier.  


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 05:58:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
This one is pretty interesting, too: Adieu. It claims it was the most common German form of 'goodbye' until the WWI wave of anti-French  propaganda, that it's still used in Swiss German, that au Revoir is actually used in some regions instead of auf Wiedersehen, and so on...

In any case, I have always disliked tschuess myself, I don't know why. It sounds excessively familiar to me, definitely not the kind of thing I would utter to strangers or mere acquaintances.

tens of millions of people stand to see their lives ruined because the bureaucrats at the ECB don't understand introductory economics -- Dean Baker

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 05:13:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
tschuess

bless you!

it always sounds like 'schuss' to me, skiing the fall line...

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 06:13:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
and the Germans laugh at the Swiss who say "Adieu" in German.  ha!
by stevesim on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 05:14:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
This use seems appropriate:
Adieu wird heutzutage oft auch im Sinne von ,,Auf Nimmerwiedersehen" bzw. ,,Lebe wohl" verwendet, wenn man davon ausgeht, dass man die zu verabschiedende Person/Sache nicht wiedersieht bzw. nicht wiedersehen möchte.


tens of millions of people stand to see their lives ruined because the bureaucrats at the ECB don't understand introductory economics -- Dean Baker
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 05:16:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I found it quite cute to have the Swiss Germans say adieu to me when I had only briefly interacted with them.  
by stevesim on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 05:34:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That's not my experience though; I hear Tschüss on a constant basis here in the Berchtesgadener region and in the area of Passau.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 02:45:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh, and I also hear "servus" a lot.


'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 02:47:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
funny, from Berlin west to Bremen, i hear Ciao as much as any other, particularly if the people are younger than 40. Nearly the same in Bergisches Land, less so in the Ruhrpott.

In my earliest days, i thought everyone was mispronouncing Cheers.

An Ossie girlfriend jokingly uses Tschüssikovski.

Relating to another comment, i don't understand what Bath's Wife is describing. I find most Germans to be Streaming Founts of Happy-go-luckiness. Particularly Frisians.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anas Nin

by Crazy Horse on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 04:24:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Particularly Frisians.

What do you expect from a people that drink Friesengeist (56% alcohol)?

by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 04:30:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Please tell me you're joking. I've seen less grumpiness on the Paris metro than I see on a daily basis here.  It's not 100% though. And if you're not joking, that's actually good news, but it means I'm living in the wrong part of Germany. Anyway, eventually we want to be near Strasbourg.

The less-old people around here also use "ciao" a good deal.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher

by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 05:38:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
really?  you're in Bavaria?  

when I lived in Bavaria, I would walk to work and all of the shopkeepers, bus drivers, etc would wave to me as I went by.  The bakery would have my daily order ready as I stepped through the door, and even in shops where they did not know me, they waved aside the rest of the payment when I had to count my pennies to make up the price.

but then I look rather German and can understand that most people are not treated so well.

in Strasbourg, French people treat me very well and are extremely kind but always mistake me for a German, although I speak French perfectly and am French. the Germans on the other side of the border are also happy-go-lucky as the Bavarians.  

I only ever ran afoul of Germans in my last job where they felt very threatened by me, and were extremely defensive about German supremacy in all aspects of life  even when no challenge was intended.

by stevesim on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 06:22:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, I'm in very "tip end" of Bavaria, pretty well surrounded by Austria, so maybe that makes a difference. I think I must look English, as they usually mistake me for English rather than American (all my family from both maternal and paternal sides were in the USA before it WAS the USA, though they were all from England. I must be descended from debtors and criminals.)  

I've always been treated very well in France and England and in the Strasbourg area, but not so much in Austria. I never found New Yorkers to be anything but nice - fun, even - and I worked in every borough from time to time.  Naturally there are plenty of exceptions here; certainly the Zahnartz and doctors are very friendly to us, but it took the shopkeepers forever to warm up to me, and some still haven't. I'll miss the area when we move, but only for the natural surroundings, not for the general populace.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher

by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 09:12:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
ah, well Austrians I always found to be very harsh people which is of course, a gross generalization.
by stevesim on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 09:28:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You should move to Berlin: It's the New York of Germany! Or perhaps the New Jersey.

When I was young and naive I believed the stereotype that south Germans are much more friendly, open, out-going then the more reserved northerners. And then a native son of Munich explained to me in that the northern gernan university town he now lived people were much more polite and friendly then in Munich. Well, so much for that.

by IM on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 10:15:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
IMHO, being similar to NYC is not a selling point.  NYC is full of bankers and financiers and other very ambitious and greedy people, and not so many interesting ones anymore.
by stevesim on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 10:25:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Not my New York. My New York exists solely in movies and tv shows. And some books.
by IM on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 10:40:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
He probably means NY before the bankers took over the city. Older New Yorkers like Berlin because it reminds them of what NY used to be like. Fortunately, the Germans had the sense to put their financial centre in Frankfurt, so it's not such a big deal if they ruin it.....
by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 10:52:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I think the odd appeal of Berlin is that is was frozen in time from 1945-1990. Until then it wasn't so different from paris or London or New York. But then the devepoment of the suburbs didn't really happen and the deveopment of an financial/advertising/media center didn't happen and so these cities diverged. Even Frankfurt, much smaller then Berlin prior to 1945, developed a skyline and financial district and was getting car-centric in the sixties and seventies.

That makes Berlin so strange. The gentrification of the lower east side or whatever part of Manhattan you want to take happened not in the sixties or seventies, but in Prenzlauer Berg and Kreuzberg etc, ten, fifteen years ago.  

And is not just a vague impressions: Berlin is still the cheapest city in western europe or even in Germany.

by IM on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 11:01:36 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I was last in NYC about 4 years ago and had a terrific time. I didn't hang around Wall Street or the Upper East Side much, though, or the 'chicest' hangouts, so not bankers to fool with, and I never fail to find interesting people with whom to talk. I also can't get enough of the museums.  

I try to find authors appearing in bookstores or interesting people giving lectures somewhere, often for free, so lots to do. I even enjoy sitting or standing off to the side in Grand Central Station or on the steps of the Library - something always happens.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher

by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 04:18:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
NYC ain't what it used to be.  it's for rich people now.  same thing that is happening to Paris.  
by stevesim on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 04:34:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Take a tour of Eastern European capitals...

tens of millions of people stand to see their lives ruined because the bureaucrats at the ECB don't understand introductory economics -- Dean Baker
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 04:47:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Bookstores? Plural? Publishers Weekly apparently had a survey that showed that NYC had fewer bookstores per capita today than any other major US city.
by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Tue Feb 7th, 2012 at 01:33:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
beautiful city, both sides of it.
by redstar on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 10:32:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Ja, ve make ze leetle Witz.

Though my data is skewed, as people react to my shining sunniness in the same fashion.

I love the fresh cold. But wow, the fast flowing Weser is chocked with ice floes.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anas Nin

by Crazy Horse on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 09:10:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Heh. It could be that I'M the problem. I'll let you be the judge of that after a meetup.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 09:13:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Oops. I read that as "IM's the problem.
(Har)

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 09:50:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
did I ever do to you?

And I'm what I'm.

by IM on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 10:00:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
OK, I'l call you Popeye (I yam what I yam), ja auch gar im Salon.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 10:39:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
NO, NO, not IM.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 04:19:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You couldn't mention God in a French school.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 04:52:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Is "adieu" (i.e. "a dieu") allowed?
by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 05:05:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Only if you're actually reciting Racine or Molière or whatever. It's not in everyday use : in modern French, it carries a connotation that you don't expect to see the person ever again.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 05:44:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Is there any way we could get him to take over Germany? France? Here's what he just said:
Newt Gingrich said Sunday that an "age of austerity" is the wrong solution for the economy and would "punish" the American people. He said he prefers "pro-growth" policies instead. The comments appear to pour cold water on the modern Republican belief that austerity and growth go hand.

The 2012 Republican presidential was asked by NBC's David Gregory on "Meet The Press" whether his hopes for a U.S. colony on the moon fly in the face of the GOP's fiscal responsibility mantra. Gingrich responded with some choice words about austerity itself before defending his lunar ambitions.

"First of all, David, I don't think you'll ever find me talking about an age of austerity. I don't think that's the right solution," Gingrich said. "I am a pro-growth Republican. I'm a pro-growth conservative. I think the answer is to grow the economy, not to punish the American people with austerity."

by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 03:36:12 PM EST
Gingrich is a consummate liar - like all sociopaths -  saying anything he thinks his listeners want to hear.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 03:52:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, but while the media insist there should be no bad consequences from lying, there's a lot of incentive to keep doing so

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 04:21:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
He isn't even a consummate liar, he's just a damn liar.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 04:35:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Nature: Researchers feel pressure to cite superfluous papers
The controversial practice is not new: those studying publication ethics have for many years noted that some editors encourage extra references in order to boost a journal's impact factor (a measure of the average number of citations an article in the journal receives over two years). But the survey is the first to try to quantify what it calls 'coercive citation', and shows that this is "uncomfortably common," according to authors Allen Wilhite, an economist, and Eric Fong, who researches management, both at the University of Alabama in Huntsville.

...

Fong became interested in the problem when he was asked by a journal editor to cite more articles from that journal as a condition of publication. "Until this happened to me, I had never heard of such a thing," he says. He and Wilhite asked around, and found that some people were familiar with the practice, while others were "absolutely stunned. There was no in-between", says Wilhite.  

...

Excessive self-citation can inflate the impact factor of a journal, so three years ago, Thomson Reuters started publishing impact factors with and without self-citations. McVeigh says that the company sees "a fairly constant dribble" of journals that have inflated their impact factors with self-citations. If doing so significantly affects the journal's impact-factor ranking, the company removes it from the lists for two years (after which self-citations usually drop considerably). Last year, 33 journals out of around 10,000 received this treatment. McVeigh's figures suggest that social-science journals tend to have more self-citations than basic-science journals (see 'Self-citations in research journals').



tens of millions of people stand to see their lives ruined because the bureaucrats at the ECB don't understand introductory economics -- Dean Baker
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 04:20:35 PM EST
Social sciences have a hard time relegating stuff to the Forget It File.  A physicist wouldn't waste time on the Caloric Theory of Heat but neuro-psychologists still have to go around refuting Descartes' Mind/Body distinction.  

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 05:01:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
By now my faith in academic publishing has reached such low levels that I'm beginning to consider it doesn't matter whether something has been "published in a peer-reviewed journal" or not. It's like considering having gone to school as evidence of sanity.

tens of millions of people stand to see their lives ruined because the bureaucrats at the ECB don't understand introductory economics -- Dean Baker
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 05:19:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
If you build publish it ...

teh Cargo will return.


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 05:40:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The theory of peer review relies on a few things:

1) Empirical evidence exists that can overturn existing theories.

We're mostly past this stage in social sciences... as we can see in economics, the evidence is always contestable to the point that evidence is not the determining factor in peer review.

2) Willingness to print negative results...

Otherwise, you get weird statistical cherry-picking and hypothesis bending... this is a big problem in science these days.

3) Broad fields that allow real anonymous review.

As fields become more specialised, this breaks down more and more. I'm personally aware of examples in social science and science. If your results contradict an existing proposition, better pray the field is big enough that your paper isn't sent for review by someone invested in that theory - otherwise you're in for a long road to get published, likely pushed down to a 2nd or 3rd tier journal...

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 07:33:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Sounds like quantity over quality.


'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 02:49:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Reddit: Greek Hospital workers decide to occupy the hospital and run it themselves
Unfortunately their announcement is in greek. I translate it below, though it's far from a perfect translation (Kilkis is a city in Greece):
...

The workers at the General Hospital of Kilkis answer to this totalitarianism with democracy. We occupy the public hospital and put it under our direct and absolute control. The Γ.N. of Kilkis, will henceforth be self-governed and the only legitimate means of administrative decision making will be the General Assembly of its workers.

The government is not released of its economic obligations of staffing and suppling the hospital, but if they continue to ignore these obligations, we will be forced to inform the public of this and ask the local government but most importantly the society to support us in any way possible for: (a) the survival of our hospital (b) the overall support of the right for public and free healthcare (c) the overthrow, through a common popular struggle, of the current government and any other neoliberal policy, no matter where it comes from (d) a deep and substantial democratization, that is, one that will have society, rather than a third party, responsible for making decisions for its own future.

...




tens of millions of people stand to see their lives ruined because the bureaucrats at the ECB don't understand introductory economics -- Dean Baker
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 05:25:08 PM EST
Moar of thiz, plz.

Kthnxbai

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 05:41:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Game time. Cue the montage of adorable multi-racial kids from across America uniting in hate for the Patriots:

Kid 1: "I am a Giants fan!"
Kid 2: "I am a Giants fan!"
Kid 3: "Soy un partidario de Giants!"

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 06:24:27 PM EST
oh wow, giants made that look easy. The pats need 12 men for defense more often

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 06:52:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And it could be worse.  If Noo Yawk's offensive line hadn't fallen asleep on the second half of their first drive, it might be 16-0.  Giants are pounding them pretty bad.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 06:54:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
oh man, that was just out of nowhere

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 07:48:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
This is a terrible game so far.  Bad, bad offense making defense look a lot better than it is.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sun Feb 5th, 2012 at 08:03:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
CH will go down in infamy as the man who went to sleep in the 3rd quarter, and missed Bellichek's ordering his men to lay down.

and i wasn't even drinking at all.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anas Nin

by Crazy Horse on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 05:33:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I checked out during the 3rd Quarter but came back for the 4th, since I know Little Eli tends to get it together at crunch time.

Two victories over Brady in the Super Bowl means Lesser Manning is now Greater Manning.

Everybody in the press was convinced a few weeks back we'd get a Pats-Packers Super Bowl, proving the old saying "Defense wins championships" wrong (since they were last and second-last in D, respectively).

The Giants disposed of that idea pretty well.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 06:19:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I did see some passes that were impossible to complete completed, more by Manning. He really could thread the needle. I saw a much more versatile Giants O-line, and thus better running.

What made harder for me to watch was the German feed. TV here doesn't have the supposed awesomeness of bread and circus advertising that makes the Stupor Bowl special in amurka. So no cultural monitoring. on the plus side, i did get to watch what happened on the field during many of the c-breaks.

i found Madonna horrible, but some of her dancers, and the gospel singers just brilliant.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anas Nin

by Crazy Horse on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 09:08:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It was Madonna which sent me to bed, I'd not found the play up to then particularly compulsive and watching Madge just didn't interest.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 09:18:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't mean that in a positive way. It's just an observation.

I have sat in amazement at a party, watching a dozen or so women thirty-ish professional women, of as many nationalities, grooving to a big-screen Madonna video.

It's not the music. It can't be. I guess it's a role-model thing.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 09:53:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
oh fer sure, I have a couple of Madonna CDs in my collection. No, it was the showbiz stuff which put me off.

I'm a relic of the pre-video era when scruffy heavy rock bands shuffled on stage, disappeared behind an explosion of dandruff, shuffled off and we all went home. All these fancy visual gizma-tronickery leaves me entirely unmoved.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 11:52:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
the Cirque du soleil was involved but you would not know it as Madonna hogged the limelight.
by stevesim on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 09:55:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I knew it was doomed when she arrived as Cleopatra on a whatever pulled by a slave army.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anas Nin
by Crazy Horse on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 11:04:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]


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