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Monday Open Thread

by afew Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 11:37:07 AM EST

High-class discourse, please


Display:
No rude words or nothing.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 11:37:47 AM EST
Or seven...



The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman

by dvx (dvx.clt ät gmail dotcom) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 11:42:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Gets better with age. Danke.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 02:09:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
But don't say "Aus...ty".
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 02:52:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Not to be confused with upper class discourse.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 11:41:00 AM EST
International dis-intermediated intercourse.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 11:46:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]


"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 12:47:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It would not be good to be one of the last off of the land end of the plank. A moral?

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Feb 7th, 2012 at 02:10:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
All-time consumption high, or so we're told. Ten thousand megawatts; a spot price that peaked at over 300€ / MwH; and imports from everywhere except Switzerland.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 11:45:13 AM EST
Clearly what's needed is even more nuclear.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 12:25:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Comment is Free: Spain did not swing to the right, the left collapsed
Did Zapatero have an alternative? There was without doubt space for other policies, even in the context of the austerity imposed from Europe. But how to apply policies of the left in the midst of the crisis, in a globalised economy and in a European Union where most states are governed by conservative parties? Zapatero's cuts were seen by a huge number of those who had elected him as an intolerable betrayal. Voters turned their back on the PSOE. If the only way out of the crisis was to support the right, then better the original than a copy.

The rigid institutional design of the EU, the European Central Bank and the euro - the only currency without its own treasury - has converted the countries of southern Europe into nations without economic sovereignty and indebted in a currency they don't control, as was Argentina with the dollar. Britain can devalue the pound or print more money: generate inflation and so reduce the weight of its debt. In Spain, without the peseta, it is people, salaries, the welfare state and workers' rights that are devalued.

The real problem is common to all the European left: the fiscal joy of the bubble years and national governments' lack of autonomy. The discourse is not wrong, but its application is impossible. There is no swing to the right, but the destruction of the left. It's not political theory but its practice. It cannot be true that the same welfare state that paid for (the recovery of) broken, ruined postwar Europe is today an unsustainable utopia.



tens of millions of people stand to see their lives ruined because the bureaucrats at the ECB don't understand introductory economics -- Dean Baker
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 11:46:58 AM EST
(by Ignacio Escolar)

tens of millions of people stand to see their lives ruined because the bureaucrats at the ECB don't understand introductory economics -- Dean Baker
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 03:11:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
In an hour or so I'll be off for a week. I'm not sure how much I'll be online during that time, so if I don't see yer, you know where I am

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 11:57:33 AM EST
Cheers then... take care in the balkanized underbelly...

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 12:10:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, if you happen to swing through Berchtesgadener Land on your to-and-fro to Bulgaria, you have my number!

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 04:24:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'll be going through Munich on Friday, but no time to turn right, Maybe Apr 30? I was planning to go home from Zurich afternnon of Apr 29, but I couldn make a Berchtesgandner detour - though you may stll be in Paris.
by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 04:31:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
We get back to Munich on Air France about noon on the 30th. Are you traveling by train? Maybe we could pick you up somewhere en route.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Tue Feb 7th, 2012 at 02:03:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Took a while to find your post. I was planning to go home by train from Zurich evening on the 29th. I thought of going to Munich that evening but that is complicated since there are no longer direct trains. Staying in Zurich is probably too expensive (though good quality. There are a few 4-stars offering 2-star prices, but they are still upper-end Swiss 2-start prices).

We could think of July 19 when I'll be free somewhere in Southern Bayern.

by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Thu Feb 9th, 2012 at 03:32:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
there's some good B&B's in Zurich that are not too expensive and the youth hostel has private rooms which are not too bad.
by stevesim on Thu Feb 9th, 2012 at 03:34:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Which youth hostel is that? Whenever I find  a low-cost place they "improve" it and "improve" the prices"

Anyway, a detour though Munich would probably take a bit too long as well (and I will probably commit to my old plans by buying the Innsbruck-Trento section when I'm in Innsbruck tomorrow - compulsory reservation as it's the night train to Rome, but OeBB does not sell it online).

by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Thu Feb 9th, 2012 at 03:41:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
the Jugendheberge in Zurich costs about 70 chf per night if you are in a room by yourself, 42 if you share with others.  it's easy to find.  take the number 7 tram outside of the Hauptbahnhof to Wollishofen and walk about 500 m.  

it should just be listed in english as the Zurich youth hostel, although you don't need to be a youth to stay there.

if you don't like that, try Dakini's B&B for about 70 chf for a single.  there are other b&b's as well, but I know that one.

by stevesim on Thu Feb 9th, 2012 at 03:49:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
g'luck! better pack yer long johns, you're heading into quite the snowmergency zone...

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Tue Feb 7th, 2012 at 06:32:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
g'luck! better pack yer long johns, you're heading into quite the snowmergency zone...

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Tue Feb 7th, 2012 at 06:32:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
TakeTheSquare.net: Romania: "It is very likely that the next prime minister is a technocrat, probably from Central Bank or any of the central intelligence".

Woo hoo.

tens of millions of people stand to see their lives ruined because the bureaucrats at the ECB don't understand introductory economics -- Dean Baker

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 12:13:55 PM EST
And in the early years we were worried about the rising influence of technocrats in the EU and commitology in Brussels. This is a whole other type of ballgame.

Romania would be... the third country?

by Nomad on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 12:51:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Been reading this article which was in the Salon of today. I don't know why it ticks me off so much.

The solar power compromise: Sacrificing desert to save the Earth - Page 2 - latimes.com

Larry LaPre, the Bureau of Land Management's wildlife biologist for much of the Mojave, said some aspects of the project have been carefully considered and painstakingly done. Other approaches, however, are "complete nonsense," among them BrightSource's experimental approach of shearing the tops of desert plants so they fit under elevated solar mirrors. The company calls it "gentle mowing."

"To get another barrel cactus, even a small one, takes 100 years," he said, driving around the Ivanpah construction site. LaPre peered through the windshield and ticked off what living things might be left after the developers complete their work.

"The birds are already gone. They're outta there," he said. The site "will have plants, short plants, and it will have mice and kangaroo rats and some lizards. That's it. Maybe some more common birds. The insects are an unknown, because you could have massive losses of pollinators because you have all these insects getting burned in the mirrors."

Jeffrey Lovich studies desert tortoises for the U.S. Geological Survey. In preparing a recent paper, he and a colleague scoured published research analyzing impacts from large solar farms on wildlife. They found one paper. Essentially, Lovich said, no one knows what will happen to wildlife in the Mojave.

"This is an experiment on a grand scale," Lovich said. "Science is racing to catch up."

I don't know whether it is the incompetent but predictable subsidy loopholes which allowed businesses to make profit without doing anything, or the tone of the article, or the scientists expressing worries above. And although it's not mentioned, part of this project was initiated because of the nationalistic hoopla about energy independence.

I guess the upshot is: something has got to give if we want to decarbonise the economy. But we keep pretending it doesn't. Next stop: Lalala-land.

by Nomad on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 01:01:10 PM EST
I can address at least one issue. De-centralization of power generation, which is not on the agenda of TPTB.

This Ivanpah project is aimed at power gen for SoCal. Existing rooftop space in the LA city & county limits was enough to power the entire city 30 years ago. Likely at least as true today.

Though some might argue, there are far less endangered tortoises in LA proper.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 02:19:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Crazy Horse:
I can address at least one issue. De-centralization of power generation, which is not on the agenda of TPTB.

This Ivanpah project is aimed at power gen for SoCal. Existing rooftop space in the LA city & county limits was enough to power the entire city 30 years ago. Likely at least as true today.

Yup teh stupid writ large, but TPTB WILL make big profits, so no worries.

there was a great cover of a 'Coevolution Quarterly' once that showed an LA skyline, with solar thermal on almost all the rooves, back in freaking 1920!

way truer today...

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Tue Feb 7th, 2012 at 06:30:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Those were photos from The Golden Thread: 2500 years of Solar by John Perlin and Ken Butti. Wish i could find some of those photos, in my garage in Frisco i've got a few hundred brochures with those photos, but can't find them on the net.

But it's a perfect illustration of what many renewable energy advocates don't understand, that it's also a social control issue, in which decentralized power generation (or heat) upsets the conventional order.

Here's something from John Solar Thermal History

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Tue Feb 7th, 2012 at 06:56:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Institutionalized psychopathy:

pervasive pattern of disregard for, or violation of, the rights of others ... can involve a lack of empathy or remorse, false emotions, selfishness, grandiosity or deceptiveness; it can also involve impulsiveness, irritability, aggression, or inability to perceive danger

For the psychopath only the The Self and its immediate desires exists, has value.    

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 02:20:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 01:57:41 PM EST
I'm assuming this is Amsterdam.  But I'd be particularly impressed if it was Venice.

And I'll give my consent to any government that does not deny a man a living wage-Billy Bragg
by ManfromMiddletown (manfrommiddletown at lycos dot com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 03:12:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's Venice.

But Amsterdam looks similar.

by Nomad on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 03:16:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The way to tell them apart is to look for cars in the canals. There aren't any in Venice.

by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 03:32:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
ManfromMiddletown:
 But I'd be particularly impressed if it was Venice.

Follow that link and your impressions will be granted.

The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman

by dvx (dvx.clt ät gmail dotcom) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 03:21:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ok.  I'm impressed.  

It's been a really warm winter in North America, so my first thought is ohh pretty, not cold.

And I'll give my consent to any government that does not deny a man a living wage-Billy Bragg

by ManfromMiddletown (manfrommiddletown at lycos dot com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 05:20:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]

I believe that's Split, on the Adriatic!

tens of millions of people stand to see their lives ruined because the bureaucrats at the ECB don't understand introductory economics -- Dean Baker

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 03:35:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
What does Madrid look like?

And I'll give my consent to any government that does not deny a man a living wage-Billy Bragg
by ManfromMiddletown (manfrommiddletown at lycos dot com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 05:21:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Temperatures are around freezing, but no snow or rain.

But there has been a heavy blizzard in Catalonia.

tens of millions of people stand to see their lives ruined because the bureaucrats at the ECB don't understand introductory economics -- Dean Baker

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 05:26:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Jeff Masters:

I discussed in an appearance on NPR's All Things Considered on Friday just how unusual the atmospheric flow patterns have been this winter, and today's rare tropical disturbance over South Florida is symptomatic of how whacked-out our 2012 atmosphere has been. In isolation, the strange winter weather of 2011 - 2012 could be a natural rare occurrence, but there have been way too many strange atmospheric events in the past two years for them all to be simply an unusually long run of natural extremes. Something is definitely up with the weather, and it is clear to me that over the past two years, the climate has shifted to a new state capable of delivering rare and unprecedented weather events.


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 02:39:58 PM EST
Glad to see Weather Underground saying what the Weather Channel won't.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 05:21:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That Al Gore is not fat?

tens of millions of people stand to see their lives ruined because the bureaucrats at the ECB don't understand introductory economics -- Dean Baker
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 05:27:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Maybe he's just padding up against the blizzards... heh.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Tue Feb 7th, 2012 at 02:05:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
2011: Earth's 11th warmest year; where is the climate headed?
Commentary: what do climate scientists think?

Some scientists have proposed that previously unknown natural causes could be responsible for global warming, such as a decrease in cloud-producing galactic cosmic rays. Others have proposed that the climate may be responding to the heat-trapping effects of carbon dioxide by producing more clouds, which reflect away sunlight and offset the added heat-trapping gases. These theories have little support among actively publishing climate scientists. Despite public belief that climate scientists are divided about the human contribution to our changing climate, polling data show high agreement among climate scientists that humans are significantly affecting the climate. A 2008 poll of actively publishing climate scientists found that 97% said yes to the question, "Do you think human activity is a significant contributing factor in changing mean global temperatures?" In my personal experience interacting with climate scientists, I have found near-universal support for this position. For example, I am confident that all 23 climate scientists and meteorologists whom I am personally acquainted with at the University of Michigan's Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Science would agree that "human activity is a significant contributing factor in changing mean global temperatures." It is good that we have scientists skeptical of the prevailing consensus challenging it, though, because that is how scientific progress is made. It may be that one of the scientists making these challenges will turn out to be the next Einstein or Galileo, and overthrow the conventional scientific wisdom on climate change. But Einsteins and Galileos don't come along very often. The history of science is littered with tens of thousands of discredited scientific papers that challenged the accepted scientific consensus and lost. If we rely on hopes that the next Einstein or Galileo will successfully overthrow the current scientific consensus on climate change, we are making a high-stakes, low-probability-of-success gamble on the future of civilization. The richest and most powerful corporations in world history, the oil companies, have spent hundreds of millions of dollars to push us to take this gamble, and their efforts have been very successful. Advertising works, particularly when your competition has little money to spend to oppose you.

...

Our recent unusual weather has made me think about this a lot. The natural weather rhythms I've grown to used to during my 30 years as a meteorologist have become significantly disrupted over the past few years. Many of Earth's major atmospheric circulation patterns have seen significant shifts and unprecedented behavior; new patterns that were unknown have emerged, and extreme weather events were incredibly intense and numerous during 2010 - 2011. It boggles my mind that in 2011, the U.S. saw 14 - 17 billion-dollar weather disasters, three of which matched or exceeded some of the most iconic and destructive weather events in U.S. history--the "Super" tornado outbreak of 1974, the Dust Bowl summer of 1936, and the great Mississippi River flood of 1927. I appeared on PBS News Hour on December 28 (video here) to argue that watching the weather over the past two years has been like watching a famous baseball hitter on steroids--an analogy used in the past by climate scientists Tony Broccoli and Jerry Meehl. We're used to seeing the slugger hit the ball out of the park, but not with the frequency he's hitting them now that he's on steroids. Moreover, some of the home runs now land way back in the seats where no one has ever been able to hit a home run before. We can't say that any particular home run would not have occurred without the steroids, but the increase in home runs and the unprecedented ultra-long balls are highly suspicious. Similarly, Earth's 0.6°C (1°F) warming and 4% increase in global water vapor since 1970 have created an atmosphere on steroids. A warmer atmosphere has more energy to power stronger storms, hotter heat waves, more intense droughts, and heavier flooding rains. Natural weather patterns could have caused some of the extreme events we witnessed during 2010 - 2011, and these years likely would have been naturally extreme years even without climate change. But it strains the bounds of credulity that all of the extreme weather events--some of them 1-in-1000-year type events--could have occurred without a signicant change to the base climate state. Mother Nature is now able to hit the ball out of the park more often, and with much more power, thanks to the extra energy global warming has put into the atmosphere.

Extreme weather years like 2010 and 2011 are very likely to increase in frequency, since there is a delay of several decades between when we put heat-trapping gases into the atmosphere and when the climate fully responds. This is because Earth's oceans take so long to heat up when extra heat is added to the atmosphere (think about how long it takes it takes for a lake to heat up during summer.) Due to this lag, we are just now experiencing the full effect of CO2 emitted by the late 1980s; since CO2 has been increasing by 1 - 3% per year since then, there is a lot more climate change "in the pipeline" we cannot avoid. We've set in motion a dangerous boulder of climate change that is rolling downhill, and it is too late to avoid major damage when it hits full-force several decades from now. However, we can reduce the ultimate severity of the damage with strong and rapid action. A boulder rolling downhill can be deflected in its path more readily early in its course, before it gains too much momentum in its downward rush. For example, the International Energy Agency estimates that every dollar we invest in alternative energy before 2020 will save $4.30 later. There are many talented and dedicated people working very hard to deflect the downhill-rolling boulder of climate change--but they need a lot more help very soon.



tens of millions of people stand to see their lives ruined because the bureaucrats at the ECB don't understand introductory economics -- Dean Baker
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 05:45:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm guesstimating we'll see around 10% drop in human population by 2022 as the weather pattern shifts start affecting food production.   If regional water wars - between India and Pakistan, say - break out it could go much, much, higher.  The rumor-mill has it the last time they went at it nuclear weapons were released to the theater commanders.

Lowered food production, higher food prices, Austerity invoked economic depression, leading to malnutrition, thus lowering human ability to fight-off disease, spread of antibiotic resistance in disease inducing bacteria ...

Looks like things are about to get "interesting."

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 07:31:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That's half  billion to a billion extra deaths in a decade... 10 to 20 times the mortality of WWII.

Gah.

tens of millions of people stand to see their lives ruined because the bureaucrats at the ECB don't understand introductory economics -- Dean Baker

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 07:37:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Call it around 700,000,000.  Give or take.

We're starting off with 600,000,000 to 950,000,000 already "on the edge."  

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 08:11:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There are alleviation measures that could be taken,e.g., been known for at least ten years investing in pest-proof storage bins in Africa would increase their available food by twenty to thirty percent.  However, building grain bins ain't sexy enough for NGOs or governments and the trans-nats won't do it because they can't make money doing it.

As I've said before, horticultural oriented food production increases total food value - like that dude in the Sudan (?) who discovered planting trees increased his vegetable harvest - tho' by lowering the yield from field cropping (think wheat,) the profits from field cropping, increasing animal feed costs (think corn (zea mays) which decreases total global production of animal protein, placing a greater reliance on vegetable protein sources (think wheat) which we've just lowered the total global production by a switch to horticultural oriented food production.

This ain't rocket science.  It is much more complicated and Complex than that.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 08:24:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ex-ForMin, current Foreign Intelligence chief Mihai Razvan Ungureanu designated new Romania prime-minister - Top News - HotNews.ro
Former Foreign minister Mihai Razvan Ungureanu, who's been serving as chief of the Foreign Intelligence Service, has been designated new prime minister of Romania following Emil Boc's withdrawal on Monday. Ungureanu said today that his key objective for the moment was the quick formation of a new government and pointed out his ideological options "were always Right-leaning".

Mihai Razvan Ungureanu said on Monday that serving as PM was a great responsibility that he undertook and that he had the experience of two institutions which, under his management, modernized and improved their performance - the Foreign Ministry and the Foreign Intelligence Service.

He said his political independence provided the necessary grounds for him to fulfill his term and promised to continue reform.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 03:14:03 PM EST
We have a forecast for snow tomorrow. Only light snow and up to +8 on Wednesday, but at least it's something.
by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 03:41:19 PM EST
does the Queen of England look like everyone's mother or just mine?
by stevesim on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 04:37:04 PM EST
You don't look like her son, I hope. That would really be bad luck.
by Katrin on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 04:54:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I would have slit my wrists long ago if that were the case.  
by stevesim on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 05:01:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'll let you be the judge:



'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher

by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Tue Feb 7th, 2012 at 02:21:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
maybe when her hair goes white.

but a very nice looking lady.  

by stevesim on Tue Feb 7th, 2012 at 05:07:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Thanks. But she's already 81 with hardly a white hair, and her mom died without any, so it may never be. I, however, am graying like crazy, but I'm said to look far more like Judy Dench than Queen Liz.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Tue Feb 7th, 2012 at 10:02:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
wow.  she doesn't look 81!
by stevesim on Tue Feb 7th, 2012 at 10:14:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Primaries (caucuses) tomorrow in Colorado and Minnesota and a delegate-less, pointless, election contest in Missouri and ...

Romney up in Colorado, close race in Minnesota.

In Colorado Mitt Romney looks primed for another big Western win to match his  one in Nevada. He leads with 40% there to 26% for Rick Santorum, 18% for Gingrich, and 12% for Ron Paul.

Minnesota looks like a toss up with any of the four candidates having some shot at winning. Santorum holds a small edge there with 29% to 27% for Romney, 22% for Gingrich, and 19% for Paul.

What both states have in common is that Gingrich has fallen precipitously since our last polls in them. In Colorado Gingrich was in first place with a 19 point lead in early December. His support has declined 19 points since then and his net favorability has dropped 33 points from +41 (64/23) to only +8 (49/41). Gingrich has had a similarly large decline in Minnesota, but there it's much more abrupt.  We polled the state only two weeks ago but in that time he's dropped 14 points from 36% to 22%, and his favorability has 26 points from +34 (59/25) to +8 (47/39). That after glow from South Carolina has worn off real fast.

Tuesday has the potential to be a big day for Rick Santorum. In addition to these two polls, a Missouri survey we conducted last weekend found him with 45% to 34% for Romney and 13% for Paul. Given how quickly things have moved in this race I wouldn't assume Santorum still has that lead, especially given the momentum Romney has after big wins in Florida and Nevada. But nevertheless it looks like Santorum has a decent chance at wins in Minnesota and Missouri, and a second place finish in Colorado. 72 hours from now he [Santorum] may have supplanted Gingrich as the top alternative to Romney.

My mind.  It boggles.


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Mon Feb 6th, 2012 at 08:50:03 PM EST
Romney now losing pretty badly in Missouri and Minnesota.  Mittens seems to be having some trouble in Midwest, particularly the western portion.

Minnesota:
Santorum 33
Mitt 24
Jabbah 22

Missouri:
Santorum 45
Mitt 32
Paul 19

Keep in mind Missouri is nonbinding and has the binding caucus in March.  The primary is meaningless for everything but optics.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Tue Feb 7th, 2012 at 06:47:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Also: Mittens's favorable/unfavorable (40/54) is worse than Obama's approve/disapprove (45/50) in Missouri.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Tue Feb 7th, 2012 at 06:52:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Sofia calling !!

Well, that was fun. Spent 2 hours circling the airport while they had a couple of attempts at clearing the runway of snow. The pilot was beginning to tell us that if we didn't here in 5 minutes we were diverting to Budapest, but in 3 minutes the good news came through.

It's not too bad on the ground, but I think away from town, which has an army of snowploughs and gritters, I imagine things will not be great. Have to head south tomorrow, if we can get to the pernik turnoff 20 miles out of town I'll be okay, but getting there is the issue...

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Feb 7th, 2012 at 10:36:21 AM EST
here ????? Hear !!!

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Feb 7th, 2012 at 10:36:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Usual hassle with the hotel tho'. It's a soviet era hulk and I like it cos it's a just a little bit crap in every way. I think I strangely enjoy the countless ways customer service is thwarted. I can go to good hotels anywhere, but this is a bit special in a Fawlty towers kind of way.

Today, it's -8, but there's a biting NE wind. The first room I'm allocated faces NE and the window doesn't close properly so the room is freezing, especially as this is the room where the heating doesn't work at all. . I go to the desk to complain and they give the look, the one that says that your problems are no concern of theirs.

Sorted in the end, but I fear for someone who isn't prepared to be a pain in the arse.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Feb 7th, 2012 at 10:55:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]


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